Bible · Faith · Jesus the Messiah · Old Testament in New Testament · Prophecy

Old Testament Messianic Prophecies – Prophecy #223

Bible Scroll

The prophecy of the Lord Jesus for our consideration and edification, written centuries prior to His earthly existence is

Prophecy #223
Description
He came as a Teacher
Old Testament Prophecy
 Isaiah 48:16-17
Draw near to me, hear this:
    from the beginning I have not spoken in secret,
    from the time it came to be I have been there.”
And now the Lord God has sent me, and his Spirit.
Thus says the Lord,
    your Redeemer, the Holy One of Israel:
“I am the Lord your God,
    who teaches you to profit,
    who leads you in the way you should go.
New Testament Fullfillment
John 3:2
This man came to Jesus by night and said to him, “Rabbi, we know that you are a teacher come from God, for no one can do these signs that you do unless God is with him.”

If you are just joining this blog, or are a first time visitor, welcome to Considering the Bible. We would like to offer a document that provides over 350 prophecies of the Messiah found in the Old Testament for your consideration.

I make no claim to be able to comment on every one of these amazing prophecies in the future, but will occasionally bring one to the readers attention for their edification.

Hopefully you will follow “Considering the Bible” and begin an interaction with us


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Joy · New Testament · Philippians · Unity

Philippian Bits – 1:8

For this series in Philippians, I am going to limit each post to one verse each post, and hopefully produce a short, succinct read for my friends who follow.

1:8   For God is my witness, how I yearn for you all with the affection of Christ Jesus.

Paul is calling upon God as his witness, the One who is the observer of an action, any action, as a matter of fact, of all actions. Paul is calling on God as a witness of his emotions for the Philippians, of his great longing for his friends in Philippi.

Human witnesses observe physical actions and happenings. God is a witness of emotional truths, of the inner heart and mind, of the heart of the apostle. Those inner yearnings of the apostle towards the Philippians are sourced of the Christ, and this Greek word speaks of tenderness, compassion, kindness and compassion. Paul described his emotions using a word that speaks of mercy and affection.

Have you considered that the affection of Jesus is such for you?


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Devotional · Hymns · Old Testament · Psalms

Psalms for Psome – Ps 41 – D

My wife and I are reading through the Psalms in our evening reading and occasionally a nugget of the Psalms jumps out of the page. Don’t you love it when, after years of reading the “Old Book” passages become alive, reinforcing old teachings or simply warming your heart.

This is the book of Psalms, and it is rich.

I pray I can communicate a portion of the blessing we receive from this wonderful book.

Psalm 41:11-13
By this I know that you delight in me: my enemy will not shout in triumph over me.
But you have upheld me because of my integrity, and set me in your presence forever.
Blessed be the LORD, the God of Israel, from everlasting to everlasting! Amen and Amen.

Let’s summarize what we have discussed in the last few posts regarding Psalm 41.

David started out this psalm with a statement of blessing upon the one who considers the poor, and the reciprocal reaction of the Lord toward the saint when he is in trouble, keeping him alive and giving the saint a good name, being called blessed in the land.

He continues with his confession of sin, and experiencing an attack from his enemies. The attack appeared to be the spreading of malice, empty words and whispering against the king.

Our last posting described the continued attack upon David and his throne through the betrayal of David’s familiar friend, Ahithophel, joining his son Absalom in the rebellion. He ended the passage from our last post with his request to the Lord to raise him up, that he may repay his enemies.

In our passage above, David states his dependence on the Lord to respond favorably to his request for deliverance. He is looking for the Lord to provide deliverance, giving a proof of His delight in him. The deliverance will provide David an opportunity to find justice over his enemies and be restored to the throne.

And then he speaks of the Lord upholding him due to his integrity.

What? Now I am confused!

In our last post I suggested the betrayal of Ahithophel may have sprung from David’s sin with Bathsheba, his greatest fall from grace. David now claims the Lord upheld him in his integrity? How does a fall from grace relate to this claimed integrity of David? David claimed an integrity during this trial, and the Lord Himself described David as one with integrity of heart when Solomon came to the throne.

And as for you, if you will walk before me, as David your father walked, with integrity of heart and uprightness, doing according to all that I have commanded you, and keeping my statutes and my rules, – 1 Kings 9:4

Am I confusing innocence with integrity? Can the saint walk in integrity, though having fallen in sin?

Let me go out on a limb and suggest that the integrity David walked in included an active response to his own sin. He did not seek to deceive his God in denying his sin before the Lord, as we will continue to see as we travel the psalms. This teaching is somewhat similar to the teaching of the New Testament believer being blameless. Let me explain.

The believer is admonished to be blameless in a number of New Testament passages, one of which is Philippians 1:10

so that you may approve what is excellent, and so be pure and blameless for the day of Christ, – Philippians 1:10

As you read the verses leading up to verse 10, you will find that Paul is encouraging the believer to grow in their knowledge and discernment. This has always fascinated me, in that the believer is encouraged to find the Lord’s will, which may include possible mistakes or errors. Through these efforts, the believer gains knowledge of the Lord’s will and thus discernment. Paul speaks of the saint “approving” what is excellent, implying that some actions are to be disapproved, and possibly an error for that particular saint. How can the saint then be blameless, if he is not in the Lord’s will completely and fully at all times?

As I walk my faith out, I may hurt of offend a brother. Let’s say I exercise my thieving side, and steal something from a brother. I then repent and go to my brother the next day, confess my fault, offer restitution and ask for forgiveness. At this point, I understand I have regained my blamelessness before my brother and God. My brother can forgive me, or reject my appeal, but he can no longer blame me in good conscience.

So, in simple terms, blamelessness is the condition of a good conscience toward our brothers and God.

It turns out that David is a stellar example of this, in that the Word describes David as a man after God’s own heart, and yet he experienced a great fall. In the midst of this fall, when challenged of his sin, he repented and found mercy.

As may be apparent by now, I do not understand blamelessness to be sinless perfection, but a brutal honesty before those we relate to. David was brutally honest with his God, and the Lord looks for this in His people.

Psalm 41 ends with David stating that the Lord set him in his presence forever. David was in the Lord’s presence at the very time of the psalm being written, and that David experienced the presence of the Lord during his time on earth. He didn’t state that he would be in the presence of the Lord in the future only, but that the Lord “set him” in His presence, even at that current time!

This is the God we serve. Out of the greatest fall in David’s life came a threat that potentially would remove David from his Throne, and extinguish his life from the earth. And yet, God “set’s” him in His presence forever.

As we walk this sod, let us remember to imitate the Lord’s grace, not allowing evil to triumph but to overcome evil with good. As you go about your day, watch for opportunities to be gracious to those who may seek your harm. Disarm your enemies with love!

But let us not forget how this relates to the Lord Jesus Christ, for the Word speaks ultimately of Him. Per verse 11, we know that God delights in His Son, and that the enemy did not shout in triumph over Him, but that His resurrection proved to be the enemies downfall.

Join me in confessing with David – Blessed be the LORD, the God of Israel! Jesus is “set” as the King over all, forever and to everlasting.


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Bible · Faith · Jesus the Messiah · Old Testament in New Testament · Prophecy

Old Testament Messianic Prophecies – Prophecy #222

Bible Scroll

The prophecy of the Lord Jesus for our consideration and edification, written centuries prior to His earthly existence is

Prophecy #222
Description
The First and the Last
Old Testament Prophecy
 Isaiah 48:12
“Listen to me, O Jacob,
    and Israel, whom I called!
I am he; I am the first,
    and I am the last.
New Testament Fullfillment
John 1:30
This is he of whom I said, ‘After me comes a man who ranks before me, because he was before me.’
 Rev 1:8, 17
“I am the Alpha and the Omega,” says the Lord God, “who is and who was and who is to come, the Almighty.”

When I saw him, I fell at his feet as though dead. But he laid his right hand on me, saying, “Fear not, I am the first and the last,

If you are just joining this blog, or are a first time visitor, welcome to Considering the Bible. We would like to offer a document that provides over 350 prophecies of the Messiah found in the Old Testament for your consideration.

I make no claim to be able to comment on every one of these amazing prophecies in the future, but will occasionally bring one to the readers attention for their edification.

Hopefully you will follow “Considering the Bible” and begin an interaction with us


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Bible · Christian Security · Conditional Security · Doctrinal · Interpretation · OSAS

Conditional Security – Matthew 6:23

but if your eye is bad, your whole body will be full of darkness. If then the light in you is darkness, how great is the darkness! – Mat 6:23 ESV

Security

Is the security of the believer simply a theological construct?  Is there something more to the message of the Bible than just a head knowledge of security? Have I ever used a proof text to convince myself everything is good, when it seems everything in my character yells against that inner voice?

I think the Lord may have been addressing this very concern when He gave us the verse we are looking at this fine day.

Jesus is referring to a person who has “light in them”.  But He calls it darkness! And what does it mean “if thine eye is evil”?  The ESV translates it as “eye is bad”, but I grew up in the KJV, and the phrase “eye is evil” clicked in my reading of the Old Testament one day. I assumed to have an evil eye was to be of a murderous intent, entertaining wicked thoughts or evil schemes?  I never really understood this verse until…

Deuteronomy 15:9 King James Version (KJV)

9 Beware that there be not a thought in thy wicked heart, saying, The seventh year, the year of release, is at hand; and thine eye be evil against thy poor brother, and thou givest him nought; and he cry unto the Lord against thee, and it be sin unto thee.

According to usage in Deuteronomy 15:9, that to have an evil eye is synonymous with selfishness and greed, even that of a lack of compassion to a brother.

If this is the spirit of my life, that is, of being uncompassionate to a brother in need, the Lord states that the light I think I have is simply darkness. And the self-delusion of being full of light while darkness resides, completes the “fullness of darkness”. Nothing worse than self-delusion, and that is why it is so critical to check our life against standards that are measurable, and not simply a subjective, “feel good” standard.

Compassion is a characteristic of Christianity. Without compassion, we show ourselves to not be the people we think we are. Not a very secure place!

That is unless you have convinced yourself otherwise.


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Bible · Faith · Jesus the Messiah · Old Testament in New Testament · Prophecy

Old Testament Messianic Prophecies – Prophecy #221

Bible Scroll

The prophecy of the Lord Jesus for our consideration and edification, written centuries prior to His earthly existence is

Prophecy #221
Description
Declares things not yet done
Old Testament Prophecy
 Isaiah 46:9-10
    remember the former things of old;
for I am God, and there is no other;
    I am God, and there is none like me,
declaring the end from the beginning
    and from ancient times things not yet done,
saying, ‘My counsel shall stand,
    and I will accomplish all my purpose,’
New Testament Fullfillment
John 13:19
I am telling you this now, before it takes place, that when it does take place you may believe that I am he.

If you are just joining this blog, or are a first time visitor, welcome to Considering the Bible. We would like to offer a document that provides over 350 prophecies of the Messiah found in the Old Testament for your consideration.

I make no claim to be able to comment on every one of these amazing prophecies in the future, but will occasionally bring one to the readers attention for their edification.

Hopefully you will follow “Considering the Bible” and begin an interaction with us


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Miracles · Supernatural

Signs and Mighty Works of Jesus #8B – Jesus Heals a Centurion’s Servant

After my series on the parables, I found I was drawn to look into the miracles of Jesus in the Gospels. I have never studied the mighty works of Jesus as a focused effort before and am looking forward to finding nuggets of truth that we can be encouraged by.

I have provided a general introduction, with an opportunity to download two files for your reference in my initial post Signs and Mighty Works of Jesus – Introduction. In our previous post on this miracle, we ventured into harmonizing the two passages, and informed my readers that this post will continue with the format we have used previously.

With that said, let’s return to the passages of the centurions servant.

Jesus Heals a Centurion’s Servant

Matthew 8:5-13

When he had entered Capernaum, a centurion came forward to him, appealing to him,  “Lord, my servant is lying paralyzed at home, suffering terribly.” And he said to him, “I will come and heal him.” But the centurion replied, “Lord, I am not worthy to have you come under my roof, but only say the word, and my servant will be healed. For I too am a man under authority, with soldiers under me. And I say to one, ‘Go,’ and he goes, and to another, ‘Come,’ and he comes, and to my servant, ‘Do this,’ and he does it.” When Jesus heard this, he marveled and said to those who followed him, “Truly, I tell you, with no one in Israel have I found such faith.  I tell you, many will come from east and west and recline at table with Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob in the kingdom of heaven, while the sons of the kingdom will be thrown into the outer darkness. In that place there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.”  And to the centurion Jesus said, “Go; let it be done for you as you have believed.” And the servant was healed at that very moment.

Luke 7:1-10

After he had finished all his sayings in the hearing of the people, he entered Capernaum. Now a centurion had a servant who was sick and at the point of death, who was highly valued by him. When the centurion heard about Jesus, he sent to him elders of the Jews, asking him to come and heal his servant. And when they came to Jesus, they pleaded with him earnestly, saying, “He is worthy to have you do this for him, for he loves our nation, and he is the one who built us our synagogue.” And Jesus went with them. When he was not far from the house, the centurion sent friends, saying to him, “Lord, do not trouble yourself, for I am not worthy to have you come under my roof. Therefore I did not presume to come to you. But say the word, and let my servant be healed. For I too am a man set under authority, with soldiers under me: and I say to one, ‘Go,’ and he goes; and to another, ‘Come,’ and he comes; and to my servant, ‘Do this,’ and he does it.” When Jesus heard these things, he marveled at him, and turning to the crowd that followed him, said, “I tell you, not even in Israel have I found such faith.” And when those who had been sent returned to the house, they found the servant well.

General Observations

We resolved a seeming problem with how this miracle harmonized in our last post. With this post we will return to our common format to respond to this mighty work of Christ with a dirty Roman, and religious Jews!

Questions to Consider

Who were the audience?

Neither text records the miracle actually occurring. This is a moot point, since we can assume the slave recovered as many others did upon hearing and obeying the Lord’s voice. When the slave recovered, we may safely imagine that at least the house of the centurion would have witnessed it.

The audience for the discussion is much more interesting! Were crowds following the Master as He entered the city of Capernaum? If we follow Matthews gospel as chronological, (which at times does not provide this luxury) we may understand that large crowds were following Him after His sermon on the Mount. (See Matthew 8:1)

When did the Lord perform this mighty work?

See https://www.bibletimelines.net/timelines/jesus-ministry

Where did the Lord perform this mighty work?

See Signs and Mighty Works of Jesus – Introduction for downloadable reference file.

Why did the Lord perform this mighty work?

As mentioned in many of our previous posts, the motivation, the exact reason for a specific miracle may be difficult to determine. With this miracle, the teaching that pours out from the Master’s lips provides reason enough. Of course, the preliminary motivating factor for this miracle includes faith. A Roman centurion’s faith!

Initially, I want to assign the compassion of the Lord as the reason for the miracle, in response to the centurions faith. This is definitely an underlying motivation. Yet, there seems to be a deeper reason within this discussion between the centurion (and those representing him) and the Master Himself. Matthew especially labors to explain the contradictions of what occurred to produce this discourse, and the resultant surprising outcomes! Matthew, the apostle who wrote specifically for the Jewish people, provides a message to fellow readers of the gospel, comparing the faith of a Jewish religious population with a “dirty gentile”.

What was the message for the original audience?

If we accept that the original audience included the great crowd that followed Him, we must remember that this crowd consisted of religious Jews, primarily from the region surrounding Capernaum, a city that later would become the topic of condemnation from the Master.

Jesus introduces His disappointment with the occupants of the region, comparing them with a “dirty gentile”. He often refers to those outside of the nation of Israel as examples of a faith that should have been exemplified by God’s people. (Old Testament examples of non Israeli faith include Caleb, Rahab, Ruth, Uriah, the widow of Zarapeth, Naaman, the Ninevites and Nebuchadnezzar.)

Referring to the faith of “dirty gentiles”, the Master intended to bring a realization to those who would listen, and also to shame those of the chosen nation who refused to hear. Jesus sought to break down religious pride, to even shock the religious elite into a repentance bringing true faith.

This miracle provides an opportunity for the Lord to teach those who thought they were in good standing that they may not be! No one in Israel had the faith of this Roman – a “dirty gentile”, need I remind you. No one!

This response of the Lord comes directly after the centurion speaks of authority. The centurion never mentions the term faith, only speaking of authority! This is instructive, since it is the Lord who equates authority and faith. Turns out, authority and faith go hand in hand. All faith is associated with authority, but true living faith has to be associated with the true living One of all authority. Faith in a false God, whatever that may be, is faith, but based on a non-authority.

Consider your choices during the last two years, during which we had many “authorities” telling each of us to perform certain duties. Where did you turn to for direction, when multiple voices were demanding your allegiance? Which authority did you look to for direction?

What is the message for us today?

This centurion who commands Roman soldiers compares his authority over men with the Lord’s authority over sickness, and this comparison provides the topic of faith in the Lord’s response. This centurions authority over his soldiers was used by the Master Teacher to set an an example of the One who has the greater authority.

But notice that the gospels speak of the centurion’s “highly valued” slave. This is also somewhat surprising for in the first century, slaves were simply pieces of property, even tools for the owner to do with as he pleased. When Luke refers to the slave as “highly valued” by the centurion, he used a Greek word that may also be translated as precious, dear, even honored. It appears Luke may be telling us that the slave was more than merely utilitarian to the centurion. He loved this slave.

In my imagination, this is a great mini-gospel within the story.

  • The centurion (as the Father) acted out of love for a sick slave (us).
  • The centurion (as the Father) loved the nation of Israel.
  • The centurion (as the Father) was beyond the religious life of the nation of Israel, yet ruled over the nation.
  • The centurion (as the Father) made multiple efforts to “cure” the slave, using various methods.
  • The centurion (as the Father) humbled himself in order to attain his goal.

In turn, the nation despised him.

There are multiple gospel parallels within this accounting of the centurion. Take a few moments to consider if I may have missed any.

Or better yet, consider who you identify with? The slave, the religious, or the dirty gentile?



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Bible · Faith · Jesus the Messiah · Old Testament in New Testament · Prophecy

Old Testament Messianic Prophecies – Prophecy #220

Bible Scroll

The prophecy of the Lord Jesus for our consideration and edification, written centuries prior to His earthly existence is

Prophecy #220
Description
He will be the Judge
Old Testament Prophecy
 Isaiah 45:23
By myself I have sworn;
    from my mouth has gone out in righteousness
    a word that shall not return:
‘To me every knee shall bow,
    every tongue shall swear allegiance.
New Testament Fullfillment
John 5:22
For the Father judges no one, but has given all judgment to the Son,
 Rom 14:11
for it is written, “As I live, says the Lord, every knee shall bow to me, and every tongue shall confess to God.”

If you are just joining this blog, or are a first time visitor, welcome to Considering the Bible. We would like to offer a document that provides over 350 prophecies of the Messiah found in the Old Testament for your consideration.

I make no claim to be able to comment on every one of these amazing prophecies in the future, but will occasionally bring one to the readers attention for their edification.

Hopefully you will follow “Considering the Bible” and begin an interaction with us


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Bible

One Thousand

Friends

When I began this blog I sought to produce a few posts in order to begin discussions with folks that may have differing opinions. I had no clear understanding of where this blog may take me, or if it would simply be another effort that may fizzle. ( I had one blog earlier that “fizzled!”)

Since then, based on the encouragement provided by many of my readers, I have continued to try to sort out my thoughts in a somewhat (hopefully) coherent manner.

At hitting this milestone of 1,000 posts, I would like to thank all who have read and commented, especially those who have challenged me in my thinking, or entered into discussions with me, bringing their findings to the discussion.

Thank you again for your interest, and your continued encouragement.

Carl

Come join us at Considering the Bible


Devotional · Hymns · Old Testament · Psalms

Psalms for Psome – Ps 41 – C

My wife and I are reading through the Psalms in our evening reading and occasionally a nugget of the Psalms jumps out of the page. Don’t you love it when, after years of reading the “Old Book” passages become alive, reinforcing old teachings or simply warming your heart.

This is the book of Psalms, and it is rich.

I pray I can communicate a portion of the blessing we receive from this wonderful book.

Psalm 41:8-10
They say, “A deadly thing is poured out on him; he will not rise again from where he lies.”
Even my close friend in whom I trusted, who ate my bread, has lifted his heel against me.
But you, O LORD, be gracious to me, and raise me up, that I may repay them!

In our last post we spoke of a rejection that we as believers may experience in our walk with the Crucified One.

This portion of the Psalm continues the enemies efforts to destroy King David (and the greater King David).

Verse 8 speaks of the slander and evil desire of the enemy. When the passage speaks of “a deadly thing poured out on him”, I would like to consider, in my humble opinion, a more literal, descriptive rendering of the phrase. I refer you to a translation by John N. Darby, a Bible translation first published in 1890, which was intended by the author for private study, in that he maintained the Hebrew and Greek structure at the cost of readability.

A thing of Belial cleaveth fast unto him; and now that he is laid down, he will rise up no more. – Psalm 41:8 DBY

The Hebrew term translated Belial, for many of my readers may be recognizable. It speaks of worthlessness or of no profit, and refers to that which is evil, wicked and ungodly. Some Bible scholars consider the “thing” of Belial as that of a disease, and David’s description of this evil disease “clinging” to him exhibits the word picture of metal being poured out and clinging to its mold. This evil, worthless sickness clung to David.

My question to the reader is this. Is David physically sick, or is he continuing with his theme of reputation destruction that we spoke of in our earlier blog? You see, the term “thing of Belial” may also be translated as “a word of Belial” and may refer to destructive slander and reproach. Is David describing an effort by his enemies to destroy his reputation and therefore take the power of the throne from him?

I admit this is a difficult verse to understand, but when we consider verse nine, and the connection of the friend lifting his heel against him, it makes sense that this is not a physical sickness being referred to here.

Verse nine speaks of David’s familiar friend. A friend that typified wisdom, peace and soundness, one that David depended on for counsel. This friend is commonly understood to be Ahithophel, the wisest of David’s counsellors. Ahithophel turned traitor to David, joining David’s son’s revolt, counselling Absalom on how to destroy David.

Why this traitorous action on the part of Ahithophel? Years ago, as I was reading through the Old Testament, I found that Ahithophel was the grandfather of Bathsheba. This interrelated relationship within the court of David was surprising to me, and it offered a reason for Ahithophel’ s traitorous turn.

You see, during the mid point of David’s 40 year reign over Israel, he fell into sin. As his army was out gaining new territory, David stayed back. David stayed back and fell down! A bit of background may help here.

Some scholars place David’s age at approx. 50. Bathsheba’s father, Eliam, served with David as a mighty man must surely have been with the armies. Bathsheba thus must have been at least a generation younger than David. A suggested age of Bathsheba when David first “eyed” her is very early twenties. If so, David’s adultery with Bathsheba was of an older man, the King of Israel, forcing himself on a young woman.

Seeing this scenario, I could well imagine Ahithophel’ s bitterness of this sexual sin, bringing reproach on his granddaughter, and of the death of a godly husband for Bathsheba, all at the hands of his King. This act of treachery on the part of David on Ahithophel’ s family line may have been the seeds of revolt David refers to in this Psalm.

With this possibility, we can see Ahithophel’s justification for the actions he took in his turning from his King. Was it a righteous act? I can’t see that, but in Ahithophel’s mind, he may have had ample emotional impetus to cause him to turn.

Yet, when we think of the Greater King David, how can we consider Judas’ rebellion. Jesus sought to rein him in on a number of occasions, and even at the end, in the garden, spoke to Judas as friend.

Jesus said to him, “Friend, do what you came to do.” Then they came up and laid hands on Jesus and seized him. – Matthew 26:50

What did Jesus do to deserve this traitorous action on the part of Judas? Simply put, Jesus received adoration.

The setting is Jesus and his disciples at Simon the lepers house, during which a woman anointed His body for burial. Of course no-one else understood what was going on during this act of adoration, but Jesus informed them of His acceptance. This simple act of adoration, from a woman using her own “very expensive ointment”, caused a surprising reaction from some in the room.

Lets read the passage.

Now when Jesus was at Bethany in the house of Simon the leper, a woman came up to him with an alabaster flask of very expensive ointment, and she poured it on his head as he reclined at table. And when the disciples saw it, they were indignant, saying, “Why this waste? For this could have been sold for a large sum and given to the poor.”- Matthew 26:6-9

Notice that all the disciples were indignant. Wasteful! What about the poor?

Then one of the twelve, whose name was Judas Iscariot, went to the chief priests and said, “What will you give me if I deliver him over to you?” And they paid him thirty pieces of silver. Matthew 26:14-15

But Judas was a man of action. He acted on this indignation. His reaction to the adoration of the woman was to allow a traitorous act. Through his walk with the disciples, he had been known to pilfer a coin or two. Now the idol of greed was demanding action from his servant, and Judas obeyed.

Remember, in all this, Jesus did nothing of fault, unlike, it may be argued his ancestor David had deserved by committing adultery with Bathsheba and shaming Ahithophel’s family name. Jesus simply received what is due to Him, in the anointing of His body for burial.

How twisted this story is, in that an unknown woman is honored, and a chosen disciple brought to utter shame. Jesus’ familiar friend, one He had counselled and taught for three years, became a traitor. Judas betrayed his Master without cause, without any justification, without any deserved action on the part of the Greater King David. Jesus acted out of love, even for the disciple who turned on Him, calling him friend as He was being betrayed.

This psalm speaks of the pain David experienced as his counsellor betrayed him, yet he may have been simply reaping what he sowed years earlier. Jesus reaped what we sowed, in that Judas’ act of betrayal was completely based out of his own sinful desires, and might I say, our own sinful desires.

I used to think this passage corresponded with Jesus betrayal. I see now, it is more than a simple reoccurrence of David’s suffering, but a contrast of the betrayal a sinful man (David) reluctantly received against the betrayal the Sinless Man willingly accepted.

He is utterly good, and deserving of our allegiance. May we honor His name in all we do.


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