Jesus & Paul – Different Messages? Part 14

PaulIn the past few months I have noticed that there are rumblings – at least in my world – of some internet folks trying to make out the message of Paul to be different that that of Jesus.

Never mind the fact that Jesus was dealing with a nation in the last gasps of it’s life and His pleading for their repentance, and Paul’s focus on “making that tent bigger for them dirty Gentiles” (See Isaiah 54:2-3)

Why?  I don’t know, and at this point I am not concerned with their motivation, since I will assume the worst, which may not be fair.

Nevertheless, as I was browsing my computer bible study files, I providentially tripped over the following information.  I must have found this info years back, and will not take credit for the compiling of the verses, but for the life of me, I am not sure where I found this.

This is the fourteenth post addressing different topics from the New Testament that both Jesus and Paul taught on showing similarity in their teachings.  My comments will be sparse, (unless they are not)

14. Both taught that the Law of Moses was holy, just and good.

Jesus

Matthew 5:17-20 — “Do not think that I have come to abolish the Law or the Prophets; I have not come to abolish them but to fulfill them. For truly, I say to you, until heaven and earth pass away, not an iota, not a dot, will pass from the Law until all is accomplished. Therefore whoever relaxes one of the least of these commandments and teaches others to do the same will be called least in the kingdom of heaven, but whoever does them and teaches them will be called great in the kingdom of heaven.

Paul

Romans 7:12 — So the law is holy, and the commandment is holy and righteous and good.

1 Timothy 1:8-10 — But we know that the law is good if one uses it lawfully, knowing this: that the law is not made for a righteous person, but for the lawless and insubordinate, for the ungodly and for sinners, for the unholy and profane, for murderers of fathers and murderers of mothers, for manslayers, for fornicators, for sodomites, for kidnappers, for liars, for perjurers, and if there is any other thing that is contrary to sound doctrine.

A short post to encourage you with the consistency of the Word.  May the Lord strengthen you and bless you as you seek His Kingdom.

Leave a comment as you may desire.


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1 John – Testing to Know – Test 6 Part A

that-you-may-know.jpg

Test #6 Becoming an Anti-Christ

1 John 2:18 – 19
Children, it is the last hour, and as you have heard that antichrist is coming, so now many antichrists have come. Therefore we know that it is the last hour.

They went out from us, but they were not of us; for if they had been of us, they would have continued with us. But they went out, that it might become plain that they all are not of us.

Wow – When I first read this verse, I couldn’t understand it.  Why wasn’t antichrist capitalized?  And why is John saying that there are many antichrists?  And that antichrists have already arrived in the first century?

Didn’t he know the Bible taught of the one coming Anti-Christ who would rule the world, work with Satan and have a false prophet as a side kick?

Let’s consider what the Bible says about  antichrist.  As a matter of fact, lets consider what 1st and 2nd John says about the antichrist, since this topic is restricted to these two books.

Four verses in all the Bible speak of antichrist.  Let’s see what they can teach us.

1 John 2:18
Children, it is the last hour, and as you have heard that antichrist is coming, so now many antichrists have come. Therefore we know that it is the last hour.

This verse, which we are currently looking at, simply defines the occurrence and timing of the coming of antichrist.

  • They are coming.
  • They are present, that is, in the first century at the time of John’s writing.
  • And they signify it is the last hour.

1 John 2:22
Who is the liar but he who denies that Jesus is the Christ? This is the antichrist, he who denies the Father and the Son.

This verse actually gives us a definition of antichrist.  A deceiver and denier of both the Father and the Son

1 John 4:3
and every spirit that does not confess Jesus is not from God. This is the spirit of the antichrist, which you heard was coming and now is in the world already.

A bit more definition of antichrist – one that does not confess Jesus (as Lord).  Also that there is a spirit associated with antichrist.

2 John 1:7
For many deceivers have gone out into the world, those who do not confess the coming of Jesus Christ in the flesh. Such a one is the deceiver and the antichrist.

John’s second epistle describes antichrist as a deceiver and denier of the humanity of Christ.  This is 1 John 2:22 retold!

So, as a test for believers, 1 & 2 John is instructive regarding antichrist.  Defining antichrist gives guidance for believers.

Our particular set of verses in 1 John 2:18-19 speak of consistency of faith.  Perseverance in following the Jesus described in the Bible, who has been raised from the dead, ascended bodily into heaven, and reigning from above.

In summary, these verses speak of antichrist not continuing with the family of God. This verse is often called upon to defend an Augustinian theology, but that is not my goal with this blog.  I would like to be practical for once.

love-one-another.jpg

A living faith in the Son and the Father requires a living relationship with His people.  Continue with His people, or it may appear that in pulling away from a fellowship of believers, the actions of antichrist are being replicated.

Dear reader, do not fall for the teaching that is popular nowadays, that church can be virtual, that Christianity can be lived through a monitor.  A monitor does not have a beating heart for God, a sense of belonging with one another.  The television monitor becomes a barrier in fulfilling these exhortations.  The family of God is a one another community.  We need each other.

I will publish a list on “one another” commands found within the New Testament in our next installment.

I hope you found a truth that was helpful in your life within this post.  Drop me a line, or send this post to a friend that you thought of recently.


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Judge Judge Judge – δικαιοκρισία – Verse List for Study 7

Because of the Cross

This word is found 1 time in 1 verse within the New Testament. 

See previous study for entire list.

Still kinda anal about order in the series naming – Thanks for understanding!

 

 

I look forward to comments and discussion.  May the Lord give you an understanding heart and a willing spirit to consider the Bible and all it’s wealth.


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Judge Judge Judge – δικαιοκρισία –Study 7

Because of the Cross

Thanks for returning to this series on “Judge Judge Judge” and my feeble attempt to understand a believers responsibility and right to make judgments.

Another purpose of this series hopefully is to understand the believers restriction on judgement. 

What can a Christian judge?  How is he to judge?  What is prohibited in the Christian life to judge.  So many questions and concerns. 

Our seventh greek word related to judging is…

dikaiokrisia

δικαιοκρισία – dikaiokrisia – righteous judgment

This word is found 1 time in 1 verse within the New Testament.  A full listing of all verses may be found below for your self study – ha one verse!

Romans 2:5

But because of your hard and impenitent heart you are storing up wrath for yourself on the day of wrath when God’s righteous judgment will be revealed.

Ok – so this verse is an interesting verse since context lets me think of a couple scenarios.

Let me explain.

The issue in my mind is the identification of the “O man” in verse 1.

Most of my Christian life, I have considered the one Paul refers to as “O man” in Romans 2:1 to be that of the lost person- the one who has no knowledge of God, alienated from God in his works and thoughts.

Consider Paul’s larger context of the book of Roman’s.  This is a church that is split down the middle with the Jew  and the Gentile being at odds with one another.  Consider Chapter 14, for an extended discussion on the two groups and Paul’s concern over their co-existence.  The church was experiencing turf wars over food and holidays!

It seems to be a bit of a thing for Paul, a topic that could destroy the work of God, and allow for condemnation to be introduced into the discussion.

Rom 14:20

Do not, for the sake of food, destroy the work of God. 

Rom 14:23

But whoever has doubts is condemned if he eats,

Is Paul writing Romans as a full blown description of the gospel in order to give an argument for “One Church” with no division?
Is Paul’s message to the Romans the destructive nature of two bodies with a “church”?
Does Paul supply a teaching that extends the full breath of the gospel in order to make an argument for unity within a body?
Consider the following structure for the opening chapters.
Chapter 1 – Introduction and Condemnation on “them”
This “them” within the first chapter is usually considered to be referring to the lost.  The passage under consideration begins with verse 18, describing “them” as suppressing the truth.
Who is suppressing the truth? The lost?  Is this accurate?  Consider
  • Vs 21-23 states
    • “They” knew God, but did not honor Him
      • Could this be the lost being referred to?
        • When did the lost ever know God?
    • “They” became futile in his thinking
      • Could this be the lost being referred to?
        • When did the lost “become” futile – they have always lived in futility until salvation is recieved
    • “Their” foolish heart became darkened
      • The heart of the lost is darkened, not became darkened?
    • “They” claimed to be wise
      • I see this as applicable to the lost.  Claiming wisdom seems to be a favorite past time of the lost!
    • “They” exchanged the glory of God for images
      • This is what got me thinking.  When have the “lost” had the glory of God in their possession to exchange?  The lost are under condemnation.
  • Vs 24-27 – Paul uses the pronoun “them” through out this passage.  Is Paul describing the lost when referring to “them”?
    • This is very possible, and yet it could be describing any group of people since the fall also.
  • Vs 32 is interesting though
    • “They” know God righteous decree, that those who practice such things deserve to die
      • Adam performed one act of sin and died.  He didn’t practice sin, resulting in death.  He experienced death upon his first sin.
      • Could the one command “not to eat” be considered God’s righteous decree?
    • They give approval to those who practice sin.

Who is the “they”, the apostle is describing?

Chapter 2 begins with a summary statement about judging.  Remember there are no chapter divisions in the original text!

The conclusion of the previous verses is that “they” and “O man”, perform the same sinful actions.  So who are the “they”?

Let me ask you a general question.  Considering Paul’s audience…

  • Who liked to judge others?
  • Who knew the judgement of God best?
  • Who claimed the riches of His kindness, forbearance and patience?
  • Who would have the hardest and most impenitent heart in Paul’s thinking?

Check out the following.  Paul continues with a passage describing a level playing field.  Judgement and glory will not be based on ethnicity!  (There may have been some in the church that relied on this thinking!)

The passage describes the factor of judgement as works, not ethnicity.

Rom 2:6 – 11

He will render to each one according to his works:

to those who by patience in well-doing seek for glory and honor and immortality, he will give eternal life;

but for those who are self-seeking and do not obey the truth, but obey unrighteousness, there will be wrath and fury.

There will be tribulation and distress for every human being who does evil, the Jew first and also the Greek,

but glory and honor and peace for everyone who does good, the Jew first and also the Greek.

For God shows no partiality.

As an aside, Jesus and John the Baptist spent oodles of time comparing the dirty gentiles with the self righteous Jews, always lifting those filthy gentiles up, in comparison to the good good Jews.

So, if I am following Paul’s thoughts, “they” are the historic Jewish nation, and “O man” is the Jew in the Roman church.

The Jewish nation knew the righteous decree of God.  They exchanged the glory of God for idols.  Reread the first chapter, starting in verse 18, and consider.

So why not just say it Paul?

He did a Nathan!

Nathan set King David up by describing an event, and asking for judgement, little knowing that David would be judging himself.

2 Samuel 12:1-7

And the LORD sent Nathan to David. He came to him and said to him, “There were two men in a certain city, the one rich and the other poor.

The rich man had very many flocks and herds,

but the poor man had nothing but one little ewe lamb, which he had bought. And he brought it up, and it grew up with him and with his children. It used to eat of his morsel and drink from his cup and lie in his arms, and it was like a daughter to him.

Now there came a traveler to the rich man, and he was unwilling to take one of his own flock or herd to prepare for the guest who had come to him, but he took the poor man’s lamb and prepared it for the man who had come to him.”

Then David’s anger was greatly kindled against the man, and he said to Nathan, “As the LORD lives, the man who has done this deserves to die,

and he shall restore the lamb fourfold, because he did this thing, and because he had no pity.”

Nathan said to David, “You are the man! 

David would never have judged himself as harshly as he did that stranger.

The Jewish population within the church, while this passage is being read, are condemning these awful folks, not unlike David, until it is too late and then they realize they are guilty.

Who needed to realize they were sinners like the rest of the church population?  Sure they had privilege (chapter 9 – 11) but their heart was in worse shape than their brothers in the Lord.

So long story short, I think “O man” in chapter 2 verse 1 is the Jewish folk in the church,  If so, then Paul’s use of the strengthened term for judgement makes sense, since the group that would know the commands, deserved the greatest / most righteous judgement.

Wow – that was a long post.

Judgement shows up a lot in Romans 2, with various Greek words being used.  We shall return to this passage in the near future, but for now (or in the near future) when you read Romans, take a fresh look at the first three chapters.

Thanks for joining me in this study.  Hope to visit with you in our next post as we look at the Greek term δικαίωμα which is commonly translated righteousness, ordinance, judgment, justification in the New Testament.

Be Blessed.

I look forward to comments and discussion.  May the Lord give you an understanding heart and a willing spirit to consider the Bible and all it’s wealth.


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Song Squawk – Pain

In the mid nineties, I had a little red Buick and a big ol’ bass box in the trunk, and would listen to “Christian Rock”, cranked to 11.

(What did you say?  Huh?  Can  you say that again, I didn’t hear you….)

I have gotten away from that genre for many reasons, the least of which may be a loss of hearing, but some songs have stuck with me over the decades.

The artist’s I listened to sought to reflect Scriptural teaching for the most part. They ranged from “preaching” pop culture religion to significant theological teaching. As I listened to the lyrics, I found some to be quite challenging.

To be honest, I listened because I could justify the rock beat with “sanctified lyrics”.

Occassionaly I will post a song, supply the lyrics and make a comment or two. If you decide to listen to the tune, turn the speaker down unless you are already deaf. Some of the songs tend to have a certain “volume” about them!


This post will consider the song

Pain – by Grammatrain

At first the bass line had me. (Remember the bass box in my little car – this song vibrated the road!) Besides the bass line, this song speaks!

As we travel this world with faith in the Master, I have learned that the teaching of the prosperity gospel is empty, void and so deceptive.

When I became a believer, to be victorious meant always a smile, success, great feelings and never admitting to weakness, or to the tensions in the believers life that are so real.

If you are a beleiver, understand that faith lives in suffering and the pain of a broken world. Grammatrain nails this concept. I personally have experienced some difficult times internally lately, and need to look to the Master in the mist of them.

This song hit me today!

I find through every ounce of pain I feel
That my mind cannot deny that God is real

I have referred to this group once before (Execution – by Grammatrain), and will likely direct you to them again. They are awesome! This song hits home in so many ways. If you are struggling, take a listen, and read the lyrics. So much tension!

Take a listen!

Pain – by Grammatrain

Pain – by Grammatrain

I wish that I could say I am a perfect man
I wish sometimes that I would not be who I am
One day I decided I would think on this
Not knowing if faith and pain could co-exist

Could I ever on my own conceive
Of someone I did not know, but I need?
I must be made to be at peace and communion
‘Cause there must be some place
Somehow from where I have fallen

I find through every ounce of pain I feel
That my mind cannot deny that God is real

The inconsistency of what I say I should be
Compared to what I am in actuality
Leaves me in conclusion that I know the way
Though I am unable to always obey

Nothing in this world has satisfied
My soul’s hunger for a deeper life
The weight of my misdeeds were crushing, blinding me
And I still live with pain inside but now I can see

And I find through every ounce of pain I feel
That my mind cannot deny that God is real

The pieces of my life are scattered on the floor
I stared at them till I could take no more

I do not deserve to be set free
Forgiveness is what I desperately need
If it wasn’t for the perfect blood was shed
Would I not be dead inside but I live now instead

I find through every ounce of pain I feel
That my mind cannot deny that God is real

I find through every ounce of pain I feel
That my mind cannot deny that God is real

I know my faith’s still here
Believe through all my tears

Let me know what you think of the lyrics, and of the tunes!


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Thanks again for coming to visit. I hope you found something of interest in this post and would appreciate a comment, to begin a discussion.

Jesus on the Sabbath – Part 12 – Hypocrite

jesus-the-grain-fieldRecently I penned a series of post on the Ten Commandments and as I was writing it, found that the Sabbath day was the only commandment not reapplied  to believers in the New Testament.

In writing that series of posts, I was reminded that the Sabbath day was one of the main irritants between the Lord Jesus and the Pharisees.

Our next passage to delve into is the woman stricken with a disability for 18 years.  Eighteen years of being bent over, bound by Satan!

Luke 13:10 Now he was teaching in one of the synagogues on the Sabbath.

Jesus was able to teach in the synagogue as He often did.  He found an audience, and He was teaching those who would hear and see of His identity.  Every sermon or message He gave was of His identity, and their need of realizing this truth!

Though He was in the synagogue, He found opposition fairly often in them.  Many of those who followed Him were of the riff raff, the lowly and disaffected, those without a religious heritage.

11 And behold, there was a woman who had had a disabling spirit for eighteen years. She was bent over and could not fully straighten herself.

A little later in the passage, Jesus defines the source of her debilitation.

12 When Jesus saw her, he called her over and said to her, “Woman, you are freed from your disability.”

13 And he laid his hands on her, and immediately she was made straight, and she glorified God.

Seven words.  One touch.  Immediately she was upright.

Note that this is Luke telling the story.  Dr Luke.  No doctor can do what Jesus does, when He wills to perform some healing.

14 But the ruler of the synagogue, indignant because Jesus had healed on the Sabbath, said to the people, “There are six days in which work ought to be done. Come on those days and be healed, and not on the Sabbath day.”

Said to the people?  What gives with that?  This ruler was trying to control the miraculous.  Good luck with that.

The woman came to the synagogue to worship, and the God she worshiped, bent over and crippled, came to her and healed her.  And a religious man rebuked the crowd of faithful worshipers of God, in order to protect the Sabbath.

Who was made for who again?  (Check out an earlier post Jesus on the Sabbath – Part 4 – My Authority!)

15 Then the Lord answered him, “You hypocrites! Does not each of you on the Sabbath untie his ox or his donkey from the manger and lead it away to water it?

hypocriteHypocrites

Jesus didn’t hold back here.  Calling the ruler of the synagogue (and others) hypocrites was harsh from my point of view, but then again, I am a Canadian, and you know that Canadians are just soooo polite, and apologetic. Sorry bout that, don’t you know.

Back to the post – What is it to be a hypocrite?

We all know it has religious undertones, but it was not always so.  During the time of Jesus, it primarily referred to actors in the plays.  Someone acting like someone else. A pretender. A stage player.  Someone behind a mask.

In this instance, the mask is religious, pious, righteous, pure.  That which is under the mask is the real person, the one who treats an animal better than a person.

Is that because the animal is greater than a person?  Of course not.

It is because the animal is owned by the actor, and the actor gains from the service of the animal.  The crippled lady is not so profitable

The mask looks like it loves God.  The person underneath loves himself.

Ya – that is harsh, by anybodies standards.  Jesus ripped into this synagogue leader in front of all.

His logic, again was irrefutable.  It is not unlike the argument used with the withered hand incident.

16 And ought not this woman, a daughter of Abraham whom Satan bound for eighteen years, be loosed from this bond on the Sabbath day?”

Satan bound this woman.

Jesus didn’t claim all sickness was a result of Satan, but this one He did.  This woman either actively invited (or passively allowed) Satan into her life.

And she was a synagogue attendee! Huh

17 As he said these things, all his adversaries were put to shame, and all the people rejoiced at all the glorious things that were done by him.

The adversaries were put to shame – for now.  Their day was coming, when jealousy and hatred ruled the air, and their power of life and death seemed absolute.

Seemed, I said.

He did rise again, only to rule over all!  Hallelujah – He is alive and willing to save.  Repent of your sins, believe the good news and follow the One who is worthy!

Don’t be a hypocrite like the religious leader Jesus rebuked.  Be honest with yourself and with all around you.  Love people and not things. Admit your failings, walk in humility, and seek to hear and obey the One who loves you.


 

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Redemption – A Story – Part 1

The Bible speaks of redemption in many ways.

This short study looks at four greek words, revealing the redemption provided by the Lord Jesus Christ. A short story has been supplied, in order to help us picture the word studies of redemption.

The four greek words are

  • Agorazo
  • Exagorazo
  • Lytroo
  • Peripoiesis

Each of these words will be addressed in the following posts, along with a story of Amicus, a slave in the first century, with no hope of a future. We will follow Amicus through his experience of redemption and see in his life, the life we have experienced.


Amicus – Part 1

Amicus was a frail young man, born in a world of pain and suffering, under the brutal Roman Empire. He came into the world as his mother left it, never knowing her tender love. His father, Dalek struggled to care for the child, but eventually lost him to a Syrian trader by the time he was six.

The next twelve years, slavery and poverty became Amicus only reality, serving his master and spending long days of toil for no reward. A slaves life of obedience to his master meant a complete loss of his own will, living only to perform the dictates of another. His master, Mahlah, sought to dominate everything in his world. He was an evil man, full of deciet and threatenings.

Amicus spent every waking moment in subjection to Mahlah, knowing that a small meal and a corner in the back room waited for him every night. Continual servitude wore on Amicus, sapping all hope from his life. All expectations, other than another day and night of struggle, were slowly erased from his heart. Amicus resigned himself to a life of service, in service to Mahlah.

As Amicus became a young man, it was obvious to Mahlah of a financial opportunity. Amicus had become a strapping young man, complacent to his master and a prime purchase for a Roman senator. Mahlah sent out word that Amicus may be for sale and he realized multiple interests in his servant. This opportunity can not be wasted!

Mahlah woke Amicus up early one morning, instructed him to wash, supplied him oil and gave him a new tunic and pant. By the time the sun was breaking the horizon, Mahlah and Amicus were off to the city agora, the market place where everything from fruit to flesh was sold. This was going to be Amicus’s last day under the ownership of Mahlah. And it brought about a terror in Amicus’s heart he hadn’t experienced before.

Amicus realized he was going on the auction block. He was going to the agoraza, the market place. The one certainty that Amicus held onto, that of a small meal and rough bed, was lost to him

Agorazo

1 Corinthians 6:20

for you were bought with a price. So glorify God in your body.


1 Corinthians 7:23

You were bought with a price; do not become bondservants of men.

The apostle Paul uses the generic term agorazo to describe the condition the Corinthians were in at thier salvation. They were in the marketplace, on the auction block and were purchased. Paul emphasizes the action of purchase, the purchase of the sinner in both of these verse, and the resultant actions that were to be the proper response.




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Discussions with an Atheist – Part 13

atheist

A long time ago, I was browsing my Facebook page when I came across a post that ridiculed Kirk Cameron’s efforts to sell an “Atheist” Bible.
A friend (who it turns out to be an atheist) seemed to think that Kirk was “uninformed”
Well I thought, lets discuss this issue, and what follows is a record of our discussion.
I really looked forward to his responses and enjoyed considering and responding to his concerns.
Some of my friends comments are a bit lengthy, and as I read them I found echoes of myself, seeking to defend a position simply by supplying a massive quantity of words, knowing inside that he quality of the argument was weak.
If you are a believer in the Lord Jesus, you may find encouragement, and some understanding of an atheist’s worldview.
If you are an atheist, I would encourage you to read and consider my responses.  I seek to understand your position, and if you see a fallacy in my thinking, please comment.  I only ask that you focus your position to one point at a time, in order that I may respond (if I can) without unnecessary confusion.
My comments and responses are in red.

Power of suggestion is related to the social interaction theory…someone is suggested/told something by someone else (crack head) … The bible, army regimes, gangs, cults or any social groups seeking to ban together traditionally high jack these terms meant for survival of close relatives …

This may be true, but the disciples were a small band of fearful men that hid from the authorities. They had no idea what they were experiencing and most, if not all the time, did not understand His message.

On the day of Pentecost, over 5000 people confessed their allegiance to Jesus as Lord. Peter preached and some of those who heard, realized the truth and accepted Him as Lord. Some did not, and immediately sought ways to frustrate the movement.

The Universal Church (I am not speaking of any institutional church that you may be familiar with, or have been in contact with!) is still alive and growing. Israel, as a religion, is gone (no temple!), Rome is gone. The Kingdom of God is flourishing.

There might have been no reported mass hallucinations…

Are you arguing from silence – Not very solid validation of a point.


Hey thanks for dropping by and reading my post, especially if you are an atheist friend.  I hope to hear from you and would appreciate a comment to begin a discussion.

Have a great day.


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Jesus & Paul – Different Messages? Part 13

PaulIn the past few months I have noticed that there are rumblings – at least in my world – of some internet folks trying to make out the message of Paul to be different that that of Jesus.

Never mind the fact that Jesus was dealing with a nation in the last gasps of it’s life and His pleading for their repentance, and Paul’s focus on “making that tent bigger for them dirty Gentiles” (See Isaiah 54:2-3)

Why?  I don’t know, and at this point I am not concerned with their motivation, since I will assume the worst, which may not be fair.

Nevertheless, as I was browsing my computer bible study files, I providentially tripped over the following information.  I must have found this info years back, and will not take credit for the compiling of the verses, but for the life of me, I am not sure where I found this.

This is the thirteenth post addressing different topics from the New Testament that both Jesus and Paul taught on showing similarity in their teachings.  My comments will be sparse, (unless they are not)

13. Both taught (for example) that Sabbath and festival observance and kosher diet were not absolute requirements

Jesus

Matthew 12:2-8 — But when the Pharisees saw it, they said to him, “Look, your disciples are doing what is not lawful to do on the Sabbath.” He said to them, “Have you not read what David did when he was hungry, and those who were with him: how he entered the house of God and ate the bread of the Presence, which it was not lawful for him to eat nor for those who were with him, but only for the priests? Or have you not read in the Law how on the Sabbath the priests in the temple profane the Sabbath and are guiltless? …For the Son of Man is lord of the Sabbath.”

John 5:16 — For this reason the Jews persecuted Jesus, and sought to kill Him,[c] because He had done these things on the Sabbath. 17 But Jesus answered them, “My Father has been working until now, and I have been working.”

Mark 7:15-19 —Do you not see that whatever goes into a person from outside cannot defile him, since it enters not his heart but his stomach, and is expelled?” (Thus he declared all foods clean.)

Paul

Rom.14:1-5 —One person believes he may eat anything, while the weak person eats only vegetables. Let not the one who eats despise the one who abstains, and let not the one who abstains pass judgment on the one who eats, for God has welcomed him…One person esteems one day as better than another, while another esteems all days alike. Each one should be fully convinced in his own mind.

Colossians 2:16-17 — Therefore let no one pass judgment on you in questions of food and drink, or with regard to a festival or a new moon or a Sabbath. These are a shadow of the things to come, but the substance belongs to Christ.

1 Timothy 4:1-5 — [false teachers] require abstinence from foods that God created to be received with thanksgiving by those who believe and know the truth. For everything created by God is good, and nothing is to be rejected if it is received with thanksgiving, for it is made holy by the word of God and prayer.

Galatians 4:10-11 — You observe days and months and seasons and years! I am afraid I may have labored over you in vain.

A short post to encourage you with the consistency of the Word.  May the Lord strengthen you and bless you as you seek His Kingdom.

Leave a comment as you may desire.


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1 John – Testing to Know – Test 5 Part B

that-you-may-know.jpg

Test #5 – Don’t Love the World – Continued

In our last post we considered John’s teaching of loving the world, what it meant and our responsibility to not do it.  In this post, lets consider the second portion of the verse, not loving the things in the world!  Let’s read the passage once more, prior to digging in.

1 John 2:15 – 17
Do not love the world or the things in the world. If anyone loves the world, the love of the Father is not in him.

For all that is in the world–the desires of the flesh and the desires of the eyes and pride of life–is not from the Father but is from the world.

And the world is passing away along with its desires, but whoever does the will of God abides forever.

Things in the World

Initially, when I read this phrase, I automatically think of my Prius. Or my computer.  Or my phancy phone.

You know, material “things” of the world.  But as I read the 16th verse, it doesn’t say … all that is of the world…

John declares that three things are in the world, that is according to verse 15, which believers are not to love.

Those three things are as follows

  • the lust of the flesh
  • the lust of the eyes
  • the pride of life

prius - small.jpg

Now of course I could see that my racing Prius appeals to my lust of the flesh.  (What?)

But buying a Prius doesn’t mean I have loved a thing of the world, unless it was purchased to consume upon my own desires (lusts) and pride.

By the way, the stripes were a gift from my awesome daughter, but that is another story!  You can read of it at the post Let Me Tell You a Story – A Racing Prius

What is my point?

The things of the world are not to be relegated to material things.  The things of the world are those characteristics, attributes, desires and traits that pull us away from the Father and His Messiah.   A Prius, on it’s own, can not pull me away from the Father!  But watch out – if it appeals to the lust of my eyes, then yes I have a problem.

77's pride of lifeThese three “things” of the world make us seek independence from God (pride of life), drives us to satisfy sexual desires outside the confines of a loving marital relationship (lust of the flesh), and propels us to accumulate possessions, power or people (lust of the eyes).

I freely admit my struggle with succumbing to loving my lust and pride, but I can honestly tell you that owning a racing Prius isn’t the result obeying the lust of my eyes!

Where is your struggle?  The desires of the believer are addressed here and the message is that we can decide on what our desires are to be.

Feelings follow faith.  A life of seeking the will of God (even when desire may be weak to non existent) will produce long term desire for the will of God to be realized.

Seek the will of God.  It’s got a brighter future!

I hope you found a truth that was helpful in your life within this post.  Drop me a line, or send this post to a friend that you thought of recently.


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Judge Judge Judge – διάκρισις – Verse List for Study 6

Because of the Cross

Find below the list of verses containing the greek word diakrisis


Romans 14:1

As for the one who is weak in faith, welcome him, but not to quarrel over opinions.
1 Corinthians 12:10
to another the working of miracles, to another prophecy, to another the ability to distinguish between spirits, to another various kinds of tongues, to another the interpretation of tongues.

 

Hebrews 5:14

But solid food is for the mature, for those who have their powers of discernment trained by constant practice to distinguish good from evil.

 


 

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Judge Judge Judge – διάκρισις – Study 6-C

Because of the CrossThanks for returning to this series on “Judge Judge Judge” and my feeble attempt to understand a believers responsibility and right to make judgments.

Another purpose of this series hopefully is to understand the believers restriction on judgement. 

What can a Christian judge?  How is he to judge?  What is prohibited in the Christian life to judge.  So many questions and concerns. 

Our sixth greek word related to judging is…

diakrisis

διάκρισις – diakrisis – discerning, discern, disputation

This word is found only 3x in the New Testament.

Hebrews 5:14
But solid food is for the mature, for those who have their powers of discernment trained by constant practice to distinguish good from evil.

What is the author trying to get at here?  Is he saying that if the believer does not exercise obedience in the early part of their life, their will be an inability to accept solid food?

And what constitutes solid food?

The author addresses an example of solid food earlier – the topic of Melchizedek.  The topic is only found 2 or 3 times in the Old Testament.  Yet he pulls so much teaching out of the short snippets of information available.    The author wants to teach them a truth of Christ, but they can’t receive it.  They just can’t receive it!

Consider this.

All the Word speaks of the Christ.  The Word is Christ centric.  The author exhibits this understanding by expanding an Old Testament personality into teaching that elevates the Christ.  But they can’t receive it!

hobby horseLet me ask my dear readers – Are you a believer in a hobby horse?  That is, have you settled into a teaching, defended it to the death, and refused to consider alternate views?

Are you in, what I call a Christian ghetto, where you only hang with those who think, talk and act like you?  Group think permeates your existence, and if someone comes along with an alternate viewpoint, the term heresy is ever so light on your lips?

I find it to be the height of pride to think that as a believer, the first teaching you received is the only good teaching available.  I lived this type of boastful arrogance for years!

But I think the author also has something more difficult to consider.

Christian maturity is not simply dependent on the knowledge of the Bible, the doctrines that are clearly taught in the Scripture.  Knowledge is the first step.  Don’t make it the last step.  And don’t let it puff you up!

1 Corinthians 8:1

Now concerning food offered to idols: we know that “all of us possess knowledge.” This “knowledge” puffs up, but love builds up.

As I said, the author is seeking for more out of these believers.  He is looking for all of them to be teachers, skilled in the word of righteousness.
Wait – what?
SS ClassroomThat is impossible.  Teachers need classrooms in the church, and each classroom fits 10 -100(?).  How can all believers be teachers, if each teacher requires an audience?
Alas, I have fallen into the modern church concept of Christian service and life.
Waiting for Sunday to teach a group of believers was something I loved and every Sunday was a high for me.   But the author is looking for believers that teach by way of life, not only by voice.

Back to the topic of Discernment

There are some in Christendom that claim to have powers of discernment and yet whose lives are moral ship wrecks, with open sin in their lives (covetousness, adultery, deceit…)  The author cannot be describing what these are claiming, since this discernment is a result of constantly distinguishing good from evil.
Golly – they can’t do it for themselves.  (They need to make their own bed!)
How is your training coming along?  Training is difficult and causes weariness at times.  Weakness and pain are associated with training, along with periods of failure and loss.
The author reminds us that our powers of discernment (judgement) grows as we are trained to identify good and evil.  (If you don’t judge, there will come a day when you can’t).

Thanks for joining me in this study.  Hope to visit with you in our next post as we look at the Greek term δικαιοκρισία.

Be Blessed.


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Song Squawk – Church of Do What You Want To

In the mid nineties, I had a little red Buick and a big ol’ bass box in the trunk, and would listen to “Christian Rock”, cranked to 11.

(What did you say?  Huh?  Can  you say that again, I didn’t hear you….)

I have gotten away from that genre for many reasons, the least of which may be a loss of hearing, but some songs have stuck with me over the decades.

The artist’s I listened to sought to reflect Scriptural teaching for the most part. They ranged from “preaching” pop culture religion to significant theological teaching. As I listened to the lyrics, I found some to be quite challenging.

To be honest, I listened because I could justify the rock beat with “sanctified lyrics”.

Occassionaly I will post a song, supply the lyrics and make a comment or two. If you decide to listen to the tune, turn the speaker down unless you are already deaf. Some of the songs tend to have a certain “volume” about them!


This post will consider the song

Church of Do What You Want To – by Jacob’s Trouble

The verse that seemed prophetic (although the entire song surely is!) is as follows.

Turn in your hymnals to hymn number one,
It ain’t “Holy, Holy, Holy,” it’s “Fun, Fun, Fun”
Don’t need a saviour ’cause we got no flaws,
They ain’t sins no more; they’re more like spiritual faux pas.

I really enjoyed listening to these guys, and thier estimate of the condition of the church, which I certainly didn’t like!

Take a listen!

Church of Do What You Want To – by Jacob’s Trouble

Church of Do What You Want To – by Jacob’s Trouble

Are you tired of religions that only seem to bring you down, cramping your lifestyle like a certain thorny crown?
Are you sick of being told that you can’t make it on your own?
If that’s your case, I’ve got a place that you can call a home.

It’s at the church of do what you want to, the church of do what you please,
The church of do what feels good, baby, and believe what you want to believe,
No absolutes, no wrong or right, just ambiguity.

Well, we don’t believe in Heaven and we won’t believe in Hell,
We threw away the Bible and the sacraments as well,
Jesus is just alright with us, just as long as you don’t try to make him out as more than just an ordinary guy.

At the church of do what you want to, the church of do what you please,
The church of do what feels good, baby, and believe what you want to believe,
No absolute, no wrong or right, just vague philosophy,
At the church of do what you want to, the church of do what you please.

I…I know something’s wrong,
Something once was here, but now it’s gone, oh.

Turn in your hymnals to hymn number one,
It ain’t “Holy, Holy, Holy,” it’s “Fun, Fun, Fun”
Don’t need a saviour ’cause we got no flaws,
They ain’t sins no more; they’re more like spiritual faux pas.

I…I know something’s wrong,
But, frankly, I am having too much fun.

At the church of do what you want to,
Church of do what you want to,
Ch-ch-ch-church of do what you want to,
Church of do what you want to.

Let me know what you think of the lyrics, and of the tunes!


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Thanks again for coming to visit. I hope you found something of interest in this post and would appreciate a comment, to begin a discussion.

Jesus on the Sabbath – Part 11 – An Interrogation

jesus-the-grain-fieldRecently I penned a series of post on the Ten Commandments and as I was writing it, found that the Sabbath day was the only commandment not reapplied  to believers in the New Testament.

In writing that series of posts, I was reminded that the Sabbath day was one of the main irritants between the Lord Jesus and the Pharisees.

Our last post described the seeing mans response to his neighbors.  In this post, things heat up for this man, being brought in from on the religious leadership of the nation of Israel.

Hint – this guy is awesome!!

Interrogation

13 They brought to the Pharisees the man who had formerly been blind.

14 Now it was a Sabbath day when Jesus made the mud and opened his eyes.

It is interesting that John, the author of this gospel, links the Sabbath with the Pharisees.  Up until now, the Sabbath hadn’t been a concern.

Not so now.  Sabbath breaking was the expertise of the Pharisees.  They would get to the bottom of it.

15 So the Pharisees again asked him how he had received his sight. And he said to them, “He put mud on my eyes, and I washed, and I see.”

Same story as to the neighbors.  That is the beauty of telling the truth.  No effort at repeating a story.  Just repeat the facts.

16 Some of the Pharisees said, “This man is not from God, for he does not keep the Sabbath.” But others said, “How can a man who is a sinner do such signs?” And there was a division among them.

How does the keeping of the Sabbath become an issue with this miracle?

mudMud production!

I couldn’t find anything directly related to this specific method of work being declared unlawful prior to this miracle.  You see, I am not well read in the traditions of the elders.

I assume they saw this act of mercy upon the blind man, (but more importantly, a clear sign of Jesus as their Messiah – see previous post!) found some loop hole in the volumes of laws they had, and built an accusation.

Whoa Carl – Are you saying the Jewish leadership knew He was claiming to be the Messiah?

YES

And are you saying they sought to destroy Him because He was fulfilling the Messianic prophecies?

YES

How could they not?

Jesus was becoming more and more popular and divisive every day.  If He succeeded in convincing the nation of His Messianic status, the Pharisees would loose all power prestige and honor.  They ain’t gonna put up with that!

Divisive?

Yes, even amongst the Jewish leadership, there were a minority who considered the claims Jesus was making, and were opening their eyes.

Others within the leadership had to build a case against Him.  This group saw His claims and the strength of His teaching and miracles, and could not allow it.

Seeing, they became blind.  (John 9: 39)

As a side note, it is interesting that after the ministry of Christ, it appears that the Mishnah does forbid the healing of a blind man by this very method.

rules

“To heal a blind man on the Sabbath it is prohibited to inject wine in his eyes. It is also prohibited to make mud with spittle and smear it on his eyes” (Shabbat 108:20)

Gotta make them rules!!!

Our next post will enter into Luke 13:10-17.  Hope to visit with you then.


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Redemption – A Story – Introduction

The Bible speaks of redemption in many ways.

It must be over three decades since I tripped, in the providence of God, over the multiple concepts God directed His apostles to describe the accomplishment of the Lord in His work on the cross. This reminder of redemtion was a blessing to my heart.

This short study, I hope, will open up our understanding of how the apostles saw our condition in our lost state, and the many facets of deliverance we have been given.

But first, we must refer to the source information, since my telling you of my thoughts without a basis in the Word, is only a fallen man’s wanderings down his dusty imagination. Hopefully, my friend, you will consider that to be of little use.

The following table supplies the greek words the apostles used to describe the Lord’s accomplishments. As you can see under the transliteration column, four basic words are used by the apostles, and we will consider each

The four basic words are

  • Agorazo
  • Exagorazo
  • Lytroo
  • Peripoiesis

Each of these words will be addressed in the following posts, along with a story of Amicus, a slave in the first century, with no hope of a future. We will follow Amicus through his experience of redemption and see in his life, the life we have experienced.

I hope you can join me in this study, and maybe, just maybe see the goodness of God.


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Discussions with an Atheist – Part 12

atheist

A long time ago, I was browsing my Facebook page when I came across a post that ridiculed Kirk Cameron’s efforts to sell an “Atheist” Bible.
A friend (who it turns out to be an atheist) seemed to think that Kirk was “uninformed”
Well I thought, lets discuss this issue, and what follows is a record of our discussion.
I really looked forward to his responses and enjoyed considering and responding to his concerns.
Some of my friends comments are a bit lengthy, and as I read them I found echoes of myself, seeking to defend a position simply by supplying a massive quantity of words, knowing inside that he quality of the argument was weak.
If you are a believer in the Lord Jesus, you may find encouragement, and some understanding of an atheist’s worldview.
If you are an atheist, I would encourage you to read and consider my responses.  I seek to understand your position, and if you see a fallacy in my thinking, please comment.  I only ask that you focus your position to one point at a time, in order that I may respond (if I can) without unnecessary confusion.
My comments and responses are in red.

Again for the not recording immediately you even did this experiment in boy scouts did you not? did the story in your case get skewed? … so the likeliness of that is highly unlikely still

Please reread my post earlier, where I tried to explain that it is NOT a multiplicity of oral story tellings prior to the writing of the gospels, but that eye-witnesses recorded the life and death of Jesus.

Probability is not a factor in this. Either have the intellectual integrity to state that these men (the apostles) were bold faced liars who duped entire nations (eventually), and in that lie, suffered poverty, persecution, distress and finally martyrdom (‘cept for John), or consider their record as having validity. These men were eye witnesses of the resurrection!

But then take into account the error of the “creation” …

Creationism is not the issue. You weren’t there – I wasn’t there. All those testing methods sound impressive. Not an issue concerning the Biblical record of Jesus’s life and death!

Jones town massacre….hmmm one person making many believe his story…sounds like religion or any other endeavor with false stories and no hard evidence doesn’t it? Or any other religion that is in practice or ever was practiced…

Religion is a trap! I fell into it, and I fear you may fall into it. I am NOT defending religion! Religion, in my humble opinion, has enslaved as many folk as any “vice” in this world.

I am NOT defending religion!

It is the historical Jesus, and Him only, that I want to focus on. He made claims, that if they are not true, should be considered the worst of lies. If the resurrection is true, and is, as the New Testament states, and is God’s “validation” of His claims, His claims need to be considered .

You have to be honest with facts, Friend. Propaganda, and smear tactics are not worthy of a fella who can think like you.


Hey thanks for dropping by and reading my post, especially if you are an atheist friend.  I hope to hear from you and would appreciate a comment to begin a discussion.

Have a great day.


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Jesus & Paul – Different Messages? Part 12

PaulIn the past few months I have noticed that there are rumblings – at least in my world – of some internet folks trying to make out the message of Paul to be different that that of Jesus.

Never mind the fact that Jesus was dealing with a nation in the last gasps of it’s life and His pleading for their repentance, and Paul’s focus on “making that tent bigger for them dirty Gentiles” (See Isaiah 54:2-3)

Why?  I don’t know, and at this point I am not concerned with their motivation, since I will assume the worst, which may not be fair.

Nevertheless, as I was browsing my computer bible study files, I providentially tripped over the following information.  I must have found this info years back, and will not take credit for the compiling of the verses, but for the life of me, I am not sure where I found this.

This is the twelfth post addressing different topics from the New Testament that both Jesus and Paul taught on showing similarity in their teachings.  My comments will be sparse, (unless they are not)

12. Both taught that ceremonial laws do not rank in the same class as ethical and moral standards in the Law

Jesus

Matthew 12:7 — But if you had known what this means, ‘I desire mercy and not sacrifice,’ you would not have condemned the guiltless.

Matthew 23:23-24 — “Woe to you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! For you tithe mint and dill and cumin, and have neglected the weightier matters of the law: justice and mercy and faithfulness. These you ought to have done, without neglecting the others. You blind guides, straining out a gnat and swallowing a camel.

Paul

Romans 2:25-27 — So, if a man who is uncircumcised keeps the precepts of the law, will not his uncircumcision be regarded as circumcision? Then he who is physically uncircumcised but keeps the law will condemn you who have the written code and circumcision but break the law.

Colossians 2:16-17 — So let no one judge you in food or in drink, or regarding a festival or a new moon or sabbaths, which are a shadow of things to come, but the substance is of Christ.

A short post to encourage you with the consistency of the Word.  May the Lord strengthen you and bless you as you seek His Kingdom.

Leave a comment as you may desire.


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1 John – Testing to Know – Test 5 Part A

that-you-may-know.jpg

Test #5 – Don’t Love the World

1 John 2:15 – 17
Do not love the world or the things in the world. If anyone loves the world, the love of the Father is not in him.

For all that is in the world–the desires of the flesh and the desires of the eyes and pride of life–is not from the Father but is from the world.

And the world is passing away along with its desires, but whoever does the will of God abides forever.

Ok – John brings to our attention two topics that believers are not to love!  This has always been a confusing set of verses for me, especially since a brother once compared John 3:16 with them

John 3:16

“For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life.

Same Greek word used in both sets of verses.  We are told not to love the world, and yet God so loved the world.
This is difficult!
Or is it?
The Greek word is kosmos and has the following definitions (BLB Strongs Dictionary)
  • an apt and harmonious arrangement or constitution, order, government

  • ornament, decoration, adornment, i.e. the arrangement of the stars, ‘the heavenly hosts’, as the ornament of the heavens. 1 Pet. 3:3

  • the world, the universe

  • the circle of the earth, the earth

  • the inhabitants of the earth, men, the human family

  • the ungodly multitude; the whole mass of men alienated from God, and therefore hostile to the cause of Christ

  • world affairs, the aggregate of things earthly, the whole circle of earthly goods, endowments riches, advantages, pleasures, etc, which although hollow and frail and fleeting, stir desire, seduce from God and are obstacles to the cause of Christ

  • any aggregate or general collection of particulars of any sort                                            the Gentiles as contrasted to the Jews (Rom. 11:12 etc)

kosmos.pngThe World
Kosmos is used to describe multiple ideas, ranging from the commonly thought of “world” as in the universe, or the physical earth, all the way to describing an arrangement or order.
Within this varied word usage, as in John 3:16, kosmos describes the totality of lost humanity, those for whom Christ died.
1 John 2:15 depends on an alternate available meaning, that is, the order or system of the world. This is what I call the “ways of the world”.
We all would recognize it when this “system” is used against us.  When a lie is uttered to defame our reputation, we realize someone is using deceit (a “way of the world”) to attain power over us (a goal of those using the ways of the world).
When a boast is made to puff us up, we can (and should) recognize this is a method used to influence us for someone else’s priorities.
When an advertiser uses a scantily clad woman to entice us to buy 12 widgets, we need to recognize this “way of the world” is depending on our fallen nature to lure us into providing funds for their bottom line.
These “ways of the world” are systems that we must not depend on, and need to recognize as being temporary, fleeting and trending to destruction.
And if you love this system, the love of the Father is not in you.

I hope you found a truth that was helpful in your life within this post.  Drop me a line, or send this post to a friend that you thought of recently.


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Judge Judge Judge – διάκρισις – Study 6-B

Because of the CrossThanks for returning to this series on “Judge Judge Judge” and my feeble attempt to understand a believers responsibility and right to make judgments.

Another purpose of this series hopefully is to understand the believers restriction on judgement. 

What can a Christian judge?  How is he to judge?  What is prohibited in the Christian life to judge.  So many questions and concerns. 

Our sixth greek word related to judging is…

diakrisis

διάκρισις – diakrisis – discerning, discern, disputation

This word is found only 3x in the New Testament.

 

1 Corinthians 12:10
to another the working of miracles, to another prophecy, to another the ability to distinguish between spirits, to another various kinds of tongues, to another the interpretation of tongues.

The Corinthian Church

Bema Seat at Corinth
Bema Seat at Corinth

Paul is speaking to believers who have been granted all the gifts of the Spirit (check out the beginning of the book).  Paul informs us that the Corinthian church is fully equipped to minister to both the believers within and the lost without.  The Corinthian church actually had saints in it that could discern / judge / distinguish between spirits.

Is Paul discussing the ability to judge between an unclean spirit and the Holy Spirit?  (I’m thinking so)  Is he speaking of discerning between a haughty spirit and a humble spirit? (This may be also his intent.)  Either way, judging spirits was available for the first century believer in Corinth
How did that work out for the Corinthian church?   I mean practically, in their everyday life.  Golly – not so good, wouldn’t you know.
A man sleeping with his daughter in law, brothers going to court with each other, believers abandoning the apostle (and to their Lord), by listening to those super apostles.
It seems that the church had believers who had the gift of discernment, but a lot of good it was doing them.  The discernment of spirits is given to believers in order to make judgments on the spirits within the church.  This didn’t seem to be happening effectively in this church.

The Modern Church

How about nowadays?
Is it a fair statement to consider the modern church to be weak and without any power?  Regarding the topic at hand, does the modern church have the ability to distinguish between spirits?
Consider a preacher that boasts of his accomplishments.  Is that appealing to you?
When you see a preacher that is dressed to the nines, has multiple skeletons in his closet, is a photo op junkie, or seeks to build his/her ministry at the expense of the poor and weak, do you see one who is honoring God?
When you see a Christian seeking to gain blessing and glory and wisdom and thanksgiving and honor and power and might (check rev 7:12) from his or her underlings, consider your perspective.  I am afraid there are many in the modern church who see this as a valid, even preferred line of “ministry” and we as the laity seem to love it to be so. (2 Corinthians 11:4)

An Aside

As an aside, you may think I have a grudge or some axe to grind over the “professional” christian, but alas I think not.  You see, I am of the judgment that we are all brothers in the Lord and that a “professional” christian is setting him/herself up for a lifetime of loneliness, cutting themselves off from the benefit of the fellowship of the saints.
Oh to actually be open with one another and not have some artificial man made barrier between believers.

Back to Discerning

Golly Carl, you seem to be implying that you are discerning of spirits within the church.  Am I exercising a gift of discernment of spirits?  Not likely.  I make no claim to such a gift.
Is the gift of judging spirits still granted by the Lord in today’s church?
I am sure of it.
Is it active in the modern church.
I’m not too sure of it, and with that I am saddened.
Am I too judgmental?
I have an obligation to judge (or decide) my surroundings, for without sound judgment, I am sure to accept any foolishness.
Judge for yourselves, without a plea to emotion, but on the deeds of those you look up to, and make a fair and honest evaluation of the ones you look to for spiritual guidance and teaching.
If they are not reflecting the gentle and humble heart of the Master (Matthew 11:29), it may be time to reconsider some life choices.
A few years ago, I heard a brother say that a preacher should make less coin than the average parishioner.  Interesting thought.  This one concept may assist in bringing the professional Christian into a more relatable condition with the unwashed.

Both Churches

Paul was writing to the Corinthian church, the church, when I think of them, most closely replicates the modern church.
Today’s modern church seems to be filled with both professional and lay Christians who tout of great ministries, of visions that the apostles would be shaken by, of prophecies that none will not be held accountable of, of a “tolerance” that is weakening the church, allowing sin to fester within.
Where is the sorrow, the repentance, the heartbreak for the lives we live?

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OT in NT – Revelation

old_testament_law-450x300.jpg?format=originalHow did Jesus and the apostles interpret the Old Testament?

This post is simply a data dump of information for your struggle.

Find below a spreadsheet embedded into the post that lists verses from the New Testament book of Revelation and corresponding Old Testament references.

Good luck as you research each of the verses and try to understand John’s justification for using the Old Testament passage the way he did.


27-OT in NT – Revelation


Thanks again for coming to visit. I hope you found something of interest in this post and would appreciate a comment, to begin a discussion.

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