Miracles · Supernatural

Signs and Mighty Works of Jesus #7 – Jesus Cleanses a Man With Leprosy

After my series on the parables, I found I was drawn to look into the miracles of Jesus in the Gospels. I have never studies the mighty works of Jesus as a focused effort before and am looking forward to finding nuggets of truth that we can be encouraged by.

I have provided a general introduction, with an opportunity to download two files for your reference in my initial post Signs and Mighty Works of Jesus – Introduction. I found that the format I used for the parable posts were useful to keep me on track, and will continue to use them for this series, with some minor tweaks. With that said, let’s take a look at

Jesus Cleanses a Man With Leprosy

Matthew 8:1-4

When he came down from the mountain, great crowds followed him.  And behold, a leper came to him and knelt before him, saying, “Lord, if you will, you can make me clean.”  And Jesus stretched out his hand and touched him, saying, “I will; be clean.” And immediately his leprosy was cleansed.  And Jesus said to him, “See that you say nothing to anyone, but go, show yourself to the priest and offer the gift that Moses commanded, for a proof to them.”

Mark 1:40-45

And a leper came to him, imploring him, and kneeling said to him, “If you will, you can make me clean.” Moved with pity, he stretched out his hand and touched him and said to him, “I will; be clean.” And immediately the leprosy left him, and he was made clean. And Jesus sternly charged him and sent him away at once, and said to him, “See that you say nothing to anyone, but go, show yourself to the priest and offer for your cleansing what Moses commanded, for a proof to them.” But he went out and began to talk freely about it, and to spread the news, so that Jesus could no longer openly enter a town, but was out in desolate places, and people were coming to him from every quarter.

Luke 5:12-14

While he was in one of the cities, there came a man full of leprosy. And when he saw Jesus, he fell on his face and begged him, “Lord, if you will, you can make me clean.” And Jesus stretched out his hand and touched him, saying, “I will; be clean.” And immediately the leprosy left him. And he charged him to tell no one, but “go and show yourself to the priest, and make an offering for your cleansing, as Moses commanded, for a proof to them.”

General Observations

This miracle speaks to a medical condition that plagued the nation of Israel for it’s entire existence. Leprosy was an incurable sickness throughout the world until very recently. The curse of leprosy produces nerve damage, resulting in blindness, kidney failure, muscle weakness and disfigurement. Beyond the medical suffering, the leper became a social outcast, condemned to being “outside the camp”.

To this day, to call someone a leper, is to imply a status of an outcast!

Questions to Consider

Who were the audience?

Rockies

Matthew speaks of the miracle occurring as great crowds followed Him down the mountain. If we understand Matthew to be chronological here, this occurred after the Lord gave the nation of Israel the Beatitudes, the laws for Kingdom living. Luke mentions this miracle as happening in one of the cities. As an aside, this does not force a contradiction in the gospels, since it was not uncommon for a city to be at the base of a mountain.

Mount of Beatitudes

Also, it is good to understand that in Israel, a mountain is not the equivalent of the Rocky Mountains on the west coast of Canada. The Mount upon which the Lord gave the Beatitudes is commonly believed to be near Capernaum and is actually 25 meters below sea level. (Yes the top of the mountain is actually 25 meters (~80 feet) below seal level!)

When did the Lord perform this mighty work?

See https://www.bibletimelines.net/timelines/jesus-ministry

Where did the Lord perform this mighty work?

See Signs and Mighty Works of Jesus – Introduction for downloadable reference file.

Why did the Lord perform this mighty work?

On first review, it seems the miracle was provided to alleviate this lepers suffering. This is the nature of our Lord, in providing deliverance for those who are suffering, looking to Him for salvation.

Alleviating the leper was not the primary reason for the miracle, for this miracle was a challenge to the nation. A challenge to the priests of Israel to research the miracle and make some decisions.

Let me explain.

The Old Testament book of Leviticus addresses leprosy in chapters 13 & 14. Chapter 13 provides detailed instructions on diagnosing the disease. Chapter 14 gives instructions to the priest on what to do if a leper was cleansed.

Throughout the nations history, no leper had been cured. Moses and Miriam were miraculous occurrences of leprosy, both in there acquiring the disease and healing of the disease. No priest’s had ever needed to refer to Leviticus 14 for directions on how to proceed. Leprosy was a death sentence for it’s victims.

Because of this non-occurrence of healing for a leper in Israel, and the Scriptures providing detailed instructions for a priest, the Pharisees reasoned that any healing of leprosy would be a Messianic miracle. This would initiate an investigation phase by the priesthood into the miracle, in order to validate the miracle. If this investigation determined the leprosy was cleansed, and the miracle was a bona fide healing, a second investigation would begin. The Pharisees would then launch an investigation of the One who performed the miracle, asking questions to the miracle worker to determine is the Messiah had truly arrived.

With this miracle, Jesus told the Pharisees to investigate. As my wife mentioned this morning, the Lord was telling the Pharisees to “get to work”! As expected, after this miracle, the gospels record instances of groups of Pharisees attending His ministry, watching His movements, questioning (and condemning) Him.

Jesus did not shy away from challenges to His ministry. He is the truth and provided the proof to those of an open mind and heart. He also understood this investigation would lead to His crucifixion, due to the hardness of the Pharisees position, and dependence on their religion.

He is the truth, and there is no denying it! For Him, to declare the truth will result in His death. For us, to deny the truth is to result in our death.

He is the One who is great! We certainly are not, and need His love and grace.

What was the message for the original audience?

The original audience, that is the great crowd, saw a miracle no other Israelite had ever seen. Multiple witnesses could be called upon for verification. The message they received, if they were literate in the Word, was one of a miracle worker being introduced formally to the nation, of One who claimed to provide proofs of His position as Messiah, and was openly declaring His claims as Messiah.

Oh, and also, they saw a leper get healed before their very eyes! How cool was that? Consider the rarity of this action of touching the leper. The passage in Matthew states that “And Jesus stretched out his hand and touched him“. This is not to be discounted, since the nation had instructed every little boy and girl that to touch a leper was to become unclean, acquire the disease itself, and be rejected socially and religiously.

Jesus touched the leper and Jesus cleansed him. He did not simply declare the leper clean.

He had declared miracles before without touch, and was fully capable of standing far off and healing this leper, yet He made a point of touching the leper, the unclean, the rejected. This is backwards to the logic provided in the Old Testament. Haggai instructs us that uncleanness is transferred to the clean, and that cleanliness is not transferred to the the unclean.

Then Haggai said, “If someone who is unclean by contact with a dead body touches any of these, does it become unclean?” The priests answered and said, “It does become unclean.” – Haggai 2:13

Jesus was no typical rabbi!

What is the message for us today?

Two messages seem obvious to me.

First, Jesus is the Messiah. His claims are verifiable and He wants you to investigate. He has provided multiple evidences of His Messiahship, and our ignoring of the proofs falls back on us if we ignore or reject. His greatest proof of who He is, is the resurrection. He is risen and is by very nature and work, King of Kings and Lord of Lord.

Secondly, He is a God who is not far off. He is a God who touches, who reaches out to us.

This truth came home to me during a class I taught years back. I began to hug my class mates as they entered our home, and although I was not faithful in maintaining this practice, I found that this simple act of touching opened people up to discussing issues and concerns in their lives, providing assistance (if wise) and ultimately directing them to the Lord for solutions.

The act of touching, physically touching one who is hurting, is powerful. Amongst sinners and saints, the act of touching is a catalyst for the formation of trust. How much more, when the God of the universe reaches out and touches one who is in need?

Who have you touched today? Be like Jesus, and reach out to one who is in need.


Thanks again for coming to visit. I hope you found something of interest in this post and would appreciate a comment, to begin a discussion.

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Miracles · Supernatural

Signs and Mighty Works of Jesus #6 – Jesus Provides a Catch of Fish

After my series on the parables, I found I was drawn to look into the miracles of Jesus in the Gospels. I have never studies the mighty works of Jesus as a focused effort before and am looking forward to finding nuggets of truth that we can be encouraged by.

I have provided a general introduction, with an opportunity to download two files for your reference in my initial post Signs and Mighty Works of Jesus – Introduction. I found that the format I used for the parable posts were useful to keep me on track, and will continue to use them for this series, with some minor tweaks. With that said, let’s take a look at

Jesus Provides a Catch of Fish

Luke 5:1-11

On one occasion, while the crowd was pressing in on him to hear the word of God, he was standing by the lake of Gennesaret, and he saw two boats by the lake, but the fishermen had gone out of them and were washing their nets. Getting into one of the boats, which was Simon’s, he asked him to put out a little from the land. And he sat down and taught the people from the boat. And when he had finished speaking, he said to Simon, “Put out into the deep and let down your nets for a catch.” And Simon answered, “Master, we toiled all night and took nothing! But at your word I will let down the nets.” And when they had done this, they enclosed a large number of fish, and their nets were breaking. They signaled to their partners in the other boat to come and help them. And they came and filled both the boats, so that they began to sink. But when Simon Peter saw it, he fell down at Jesus’ knees, saying, “Depart from me, for I am a sinful man, O Lord.” For he and all who were with him were astonished at the catch of fish that they had taken, and so also were James and John, sons of Zebedee, who were partners with Simon. And Jesus said to Simon, “Do not be afraid; from now on you will be catching men.” And when they had brought their boats to land, they left everything and followed him.

General Observations

This is the first time Jesus provides a catch of fish for His disciples. It is the only time He provides a catch of fish prior to His resurrection, and only Luke records this miracle. The fact that this is the only gospel that records a catch of fish was somewhat surprising to myself. I expected multiple gospel accounts.

The miracle was intended for the disciples, for the Lord told His disciples to put out into the deep, implying the miracle occurred away from the crowds on the shore He had been teaching earlier.

Questions to Consider

Who were the audience?

As I mentioned above, the principal audience was the disciples, and all others on the two boats that were to push out to the deep. Whether the crowds could see or understand what was going on is not clear, and is not disclosed as to it’s impact other than the disciples that were initially dumbfounded by the mighty work.

When did the Lord perform this mighty work?

See https://www.bibletimelines.net/timelines/jesus-ministry

Where did the Lord perform this mighty work?

See Signs and Mighty Works of Jesus – Introduction for downloadable reference file.

Why did the Lord perform this mighty work?

I understand Jesus to perform His miracles for specific purposes, some of which are clearly identified within the text, and some of which are somewhat veiled. By that I mean, each of the miracles are intended to exhibit the identity of this Rabbi that was speaking new words, that He was the One that the nation waited for, longed for and hoped for.

Yet, this one miracle has a specific purpose. The purpose was not to supply food to the disciples family, for as the test states…

And when they had brought their boats to land, they left everything and followed him.

The mighty catch of fish may have simply rotted in the sun, which I highly doubt, but the point is that the focus of the disciples lives took a major turn here. They no longer identified themselves as fishermen, for they left everything behind them. It is interesting that though the text states they left it all, this is not to be understood as they gave it away, sold it or in some way gave up ownership. No, we need to remember that later in the gospels (John to be specific), Peter is out fishing again, presumably on his boat with his equipment.

What was the message for the original audience?

What was the message. Let’s read it once more.

“Do not be afraid; from now on you will be catching men.”

The message was directed to Peter, yet I am confident the other disciples heard the message. Can you imagine the Lord looking you in the eye and telling you “Do not be afraid”? Afraid of what though? They had just experienced a gold rush of profits!

When I first read this passage years ago, I thought Peter’s initial reaction was ludicrous. Pull those fish in, bank the profits and buy your wife a Maserati. How wrong was I in seeing earthly gain as the intent of the message. Peter’s ears were of a different ilk. Peter reacted properly.

…when Simon Peter saw it, he fell down at Jesus’ knees, saying, “Depart from me, for I am a sinful man, O Lord.”

The fish were simply a vehicle to stir Peter’s conscience and soul. He ignored the fish, and confessed Jesus as Lord. The text does not state that Peter simply was astonished, but that he recognized the source of this miracle, understood the authority of the One who stood beside him and confessed Jesus as Lord.

And Peter told the Lord to depart. To go away, for he was sinful. He had the natural reaction that anything (anyone) holy could not be with the unholy. He surely did not understand, as we most likely do not understand, the great desire of the Holy One to be with His creation, to find a way to be with His people. He has sought us out since the garden, and continues to seek us as we wander away. Seeking us to the point of death, even death on the cross.

Peter also confessed his sinfulness. What specifically was Peter confessing to at this time? Was it that he argued with the Lord about His initial command to set out into the deep? Maybe. At least that would be the immediate thing in my mind. Yet he didn’t confess an act of sin, but that he was a sinful man. This is instructive in my mind, since his confession spoke of his condition, and not just a single act of omission or commission.

I am of the understanding that when we recognize who Jesus is and His character, power and grace, the natural reaction is to see ourselves in the light of that understanding, to see our weakness, rebellion, and general disregard for God and His ways.

What is the message for us today?

The message for us today is “Do not be afraid”. From a stance of boldness, of a proper fearlessness, the result will be that we will “catch men”. You see, I don’t understand the phrase “You will be catching men” as a command so much as a result of understanding Who Jesus is.

So was Jesus telling Peter (and the other disciples) to not fear Him? Would that be consistent with the Biblical narrative of God’s desire to be with His people, to be in relation with Him? Peter obviously reacted in fear, as I know I would have, seeing this miracle occur in front of my very eyes. The fact that Jesus could produce an overabundance after Peter and the gang had failed, must have caused a multitude of emotions, but the overarching one was of fear.

How often the disciples must have asked each other – “Who is this that can…..”

For us today, the message seems clear. Understand who this One is, who God is, and the unbounded power and love He has expressed in the cross.

Peter began to understand because of the experience of the miraculous fish. He experienced many miraculous events. Yet Peter would admit that the greater proof of Jesus’ deity and our relation to Him must be based in the prophetic Word. Peter truly was an eye witness of His power. He actually heard the voice from the heavens, declaring the identity of Jesus. And what does Peter tell us to do? Should we seek our own miracles, dreams, or visions, finding a basis to believe in Jesus through miracles?

For we did not follow cleverly devised myths when we made known to you the power and coming of our Lord Jesus Christ, but we were eyewitnesses of his majesty.
For when he received honor and glory from God the Father, and the voice was borne to him by the Majestic Glory, “This is my beloved Son, with whom I am well pleased,”
we ourselves heard this very voice borne from heaven, for we were with him on the holy mountain.
And we have the prophetic word more fully confirmed, to which you will do well to pay attention as to a lamp shining in a dark place, until the day dawns and the morning star rises in your hearts, – 2 Peter 1:16-19

With his witness of all the miracles, Peter directs believers to the prophetic word. This “knowledge” needs to find it’s roots in the Word of God, and to be understood through prayer, meditation and obedience to the known will of God.

Don’t seek miracles. Give the Lord freedom to grant at His pleasure. Crack open a Bible and find a foundation safe and secure for your faith. Gain a boldness through understanding the strength and power of the Lord Jesus, of His desire to be with you. Reject the attitude of telling Jesus to depart. Admit your sinfulness to the Lord Himself, and admit to yourself that Jesus is seeking you.

He is good, all the time!

Thanks again for coming to visit. I hope you found something of interest in this post and would appreciate a comment, to begin a discussion.

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Miracles · Supernatural

Signs and Mighty Works of Jesus #5 – Jesus Heals Many Sick at Evening

After my series on the parables, I found I was drawn to look into the miracles of Jesus in the Gospels. I have never studies the mighty works of Jesus as a focused effort before and am looking forward to finding nuggets of truth that we can be encouraged by.

I have provided a general introduction, with an opportunity to download two files for your reference in my initial post Signs and Mighty Works of Jesus – Introduction. I found that the format I used for the parable posts were useful to keep me on track, and will continue to use them for this series, with some minor tweaks. With that said, let’s take a look at

Jesus Heals Many Sick at Evening

Matthew 8:16-17

That evening they brought to him many who were oppressed by demons, and he cast out the spirits with a word and healed all who were sick.  This was to fulfill what was spoken by the prophet Isaiah: “He took our illnesses and bore our diseases.”

Mark 1:32-34

That evening at sundown they brought to him all who were sick or oppressed by demons. And the whole city was gathered together at the door. And he healed many who were sick with various diseases, and cast out many demons. And he would not permit the demons to speak, because they knew him.

Luke 4:40-41

Now when the sun was setting, all those who had any who were sick with various diseases brought them to him, and he laid his hands on every one of them and healed them. And demons also came out of many, crying, “You are the Son of God!” But he rebuked them and would not allow them to speak, because they knew that he was the Christ.

General Observations

Now, in the previous post, we spoke of Jesus performing the miracle of Peter’s mother-in-law being healed, and how the audience was small, and of the closest friends to the Messiah. We made comment that God is God no matter who is watching, and that His purpose in displaying power over sickness is not always for the masses. He sometimes works in quiet.

If the intent of the previous mighty work was to simply heal his disciples mother, the effect seems to be that attention was drawn to Him no matter!

Questions to Consider

Who were the audience?

Two categories of people were brought to Jesus at sundown. The sick and the oppressed/possessed of demons. Although this is not be the first time we have come across in the gospels the existence of demons, this particular instance speaks of “many who were oppressed of demons”.

This audience was massive in relation to previous instances of Jesus’ mighty works. Mark 1:33 speaks of the whole city of Capernaum gathered at the door. Obviously not everyone was sick or demon possessed, but the spectacle of a miracle working Rabbi brought everyone out!

And the whole city was gathered together at the door. Mark 1:33

It is estimated that Capernaum had about 1,500 people residing in the city. The wedding at Cana may have had numerous guests (but few witnesses – see Signs and Mighty Works of Jesus #1 – Jesus Turns Water into Wine), but with this mighty work, many in the audience were intimately affected by the Messiah through His healing ministry.

When did the Lord perform this mighty work?

See https://www.bibletimelines.net/timelines/jesus-ministry

Where did the Lord perform this mighty work?

Check out the download file provided in the introduction to this series. Signs and Mighty Works of Jesus – Introduction

Why did the Lord provide this mighty work?

Matthew provides a reason. The healing ministry of the Lord, during the night of mighty works, was to fulfill prophecy.

This was to fulfill what was spoken by the prophet Isaiah: “He took our illnesses and bore our diseases.” Matthew 8:17

What prophecy? What prophecy is the apostle directing us to, that Jesus fulfilled on this night of mighty works?

Surely he has borne our griefs and carried our sorrows – Isaiah 53:4a

For Matthew to assign the night of mighty works performed by the Messiah as to fulfilling this prophecy is totally unexpected. When I read the 53rd chapter of Isaiah, I think crucifixion, not a single night in Capernaum. And yet Matthew associates Isaiah 53:4 with physical healing and casting out demons.

Of course, this Old Testament passage is also applied to the crucifixion by Peter in his second epistle

He himself bore our sins in his body on the tree, that we might die to sin and live to righteousness. By his wounds you have been healed. 2 Peter 2:24

So, if this prophecy is fulfilled during the night of miracles, how is Matthew wanting us to understand this? May I suggest one intent of Matthew was to inform of how the miracles were performed. The passage Matthew quotes here speaks of Jesus taking our illness and baring our diseases.

Notice that both verbs have the general sense of accepting something from someone, of receiving something from someone, of carrying a burden for someone. It is not my understanding that during this night of miracles, the Lord simply deleted demons and illness. In relation to the demons, the passages speak of them being cast out. The healing of the sick is another matter, if only in my understanding.

At this point I am simply riffing, that is, supposing a thought. Was it that the goodness of God, the life resident in the Messiah, would simply overpower the physical sickness of the “patient”? Or was it that the Lord Himself “exchanged” the sickness with His health? Questions of the curious I suppose. No matter, for in the grand scheme of things, Jesus declared His identification with the Messiah found in Isaiah 53, through this night of mighty works in a little city on the northern shores of the Sea of Galilee.

Jesus, healed and casted our demons, from residents of a city that would end up faithless towards Him.

And you, Capernaum, will you be exalted to heaven? You will be brought down to Hades. For if the mighty works done in you had been done in Sodom, it would have remained until this day. – Mathew 11:23

Why did Jesus chose to heal so many in a city that ultimately would reject Him?

What was the message for the original audience?

For the one receiving the miracle

The message was that Jesus was a miracle working rabbi, that healing and casting out of demons was not beyond this One who travelled the area. Each of the recipients of a healing, would have an experience, face to face with the Messiah, an experience that should have drawn them to the Messiah, caused them to have a desire to know His message, to know Him. And yet, I can’t get away from the fact that this city ended up in greater danger of judgement than Sodom and Gomorrah.

For the Jewish leadership

None of the passages speak of the Jewish leadership, but as we will find out as we venture through these mighty works, Jesus’ displays of power over nature were not welcomed by the rulers.

For the disciples

The message for the disciples is not explicitly referred to in the passages, yet I can’t help to assume that this extended concentrated healing ministry of the Lord would have caused more questions than answers.

When will He stop? Why is He taking in so many? How can He do this? Will this healing ministry eventually heal everyone? Is Jesus going to reign over a nation of completely healthy people? (Will doctors be put out of work?)

What is the message for us today?

Hind sight is 20/20. As we watch the Messiah walk His ministry, we find that the miracles were intended to reveal His person, the God-man. Physical healing and the casting out of demons during the Master’s time of earth primarily were works that revealed His arrival, of the Kingdom of God arriving, and that the Greater King David was on the scene.

Can we as believers, by faith, demand healings of multitudes? Will not mass healings exhibit His personhood even today? Of course , this is not the history of the body of Christ. Healings may occur, (through the mercy of God), yet it is often in sickness and grief we sense God’s loving care, and realize that no matter how God deals with us, He is good, He is able and He is wise.

Some may teach that healings of this nature are the natural outcome of being a believer, that is, we also have authority over sickness. This seems to be emphasized in the “ministries” of faith healers, touting their message to the weak and infirmed. Personally, I believe many of the current “healing ministries” I have looked into reek of greed and avarice, and bring much disgrace to the body of Christ

Have you a ministry of healing? Have you, through prayer and fasting, brought health to the sick, or casted out a demon? I would appreciate if you tell your story in the comments below. Although I struggle with healing ministries, I am open to being corrected, through your personal story and the witness of the Word of God.

Thanks again for joining me as we venture through Jesus Mighty Works!

Thanks again for coming to visit. I hope you found something of interest in this post and would appreciate a comment, to begin a discussion.

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Miracles · Supernatural

Signs and Mighty Works of Jesus #4 – Jesus Heals Peter’s Mother-in-Law

After my series on the parables, I found I was drawn to look into the miracles of Jesus in the Gospels. I have never studies the mighty works of Jesus as a focused effort before and am looking forward to finding nuggets of truth that we can be encouraged by.

I have provided a general introduction, with an opportunity to download two files for your reference in my initial post Signs and Mighty Works of Jesus – Introduction. I found that the format I used for the parable posts were useful to keep me on track, and will continue to use them for this series, with some minor tweaks. With that said, let’s take a look at

Jesus Heals Peter’s Mother-in-Law

Matthew 8:14-15

And when Jesus entered Peter’s house, he saw his mother-in-law lying sick with a fever.  He touched her hand, and the fever left her, and she rose and began to serve him.

Mark 1:29-31

And immediately he left the synagogue and entered the house of Simon and Andrew, with James and John. Now Simon’s mother-in-law lay ill with a fever, and immediately they told him about her. And he came and took her by the hand and lifted her up, and the fever left her, and she began to serve them.

Luke 4:38-39

And he arose and left the synagogue and entered Simon’s house. Now Simon’s mother-in-law was ill with a high fever, and they appealed to him on her behalf. And he stood over her and rebuked the fever, and it left her, and immediately she rose and began to serve them.

General Observations

Peter’s mother-in-law was sick, and I find it interesting that, as is commonly accepted, Mark is the gospel that Peter influenced. With that knowledge, although each of the passages above are of equal value and supplies much of the same information, I would like to dwell on Mark’s passage since it has a “personal” connection with Peter’s mother-in-law.

Questions to Consider

Who were the audience?

The audience was a restricted group for what I can tell. Simon of course, possibly his wife, his brother Andrew, along with James and John. Oh, and the mother-in-law of course!

When did the Lord perform this miracle?

See https://www.bibletimelines.net/timelines/jesus-ministry

Where did the Lord perform this miracle?

See Signs and Mighty Works of Jesus – Introduction for downloadable reference file.

Why did the Lord perform this miracle?

The passage speaks of the disciples telling Jesus of the sickness. Luke does mention that the disciples appealed to the Lord for a healing, but it is interesting that “Peter’s” gospel doesn’t mention this. Mark states they simply told Him.

No matter the inflection of the statement, the Lord thought nothing of going to the sick lady, taking her of the hand, and lifting her up. No concern of an infectious disease. No concern for His own welfare. We will see this general attitude as we venture through the gospels, that He did not refrain from reaching out to the hurting, the diseased, the poor and destitute. This concept of “no fear” speaks of His power and authority, but I will not venture down that road yet.

Let us simply take away from this passage that He did not fear those we sometimes look away from.

What was the message for the original audience?

The passage does not directly speak of the reason for the healing, or of a message that the audience was to receive, so my imagination may run amuck here!

When a tree falls in the forest, does it make a sound? Jesus is God no matter who sees it, who the audience is or who is paying attention. Moments before, the Lord was in the synagogue, healing the demoniac, and the result was that His fame spread everywhere. Everywhere!

With this miracle, it was limited to the house of Peter. A very small number of witnesses. They had already begun to see miracles by now, and this one would be overshadowed by many others in the future. Lazarus, for instance!

Now I am not trying to say this miracle did not exhibit the glory of our Leader, or the might of the Sovereign One. No – not at all. But there is something about Jesus performing a miracle, in a small itty bitty house, with few people around. It is an exhibition of His humility in a sense, how He is One who does not seek fanfare for the sake of fanfare.

He is reaching for hearts, not seeking clapping hands!

What is the message for us today?

In the book of Matthew, the Lord spoke of a city on a hill, of a lamp not being put under a basket, and so often my mind wanders to the concept of many people seeing the city, of multitudes receiving the light from the lamp. This may be the intended effect the Lord tried to communicate, and yet this does not restrict the quiet deeds of a heart that seeks to please God.

The lamp sheds light no matter the recipients, whether few or many.

Many believers may feel inadequate to be a central figure, one who is on display. There may come a time for the shy and withdrawn to take a public stand, or to rise publicly to their convictions. This is a great challenge and may be a specific calling at some time in their lives.

Yet I would like to draw your attention to a passage in Matthew that may somewhat shed some light on my muddled thoughts I am pursuing.

“Thus, when you give to the needy, sound no trumpet before you, as the hypocrites do in the synagogues and in the streets, that they may be praised by others. Truly, I say to you, they have received their reward.
But when you give to the needy, do not let your left hand know what your right hand is doing,
so that your giving may be in secret. And your Father who sees in secret will reward you. Matthew 6:2-4

Jesus did this mighty work in relative obscurity. Very few people witnessed this healing. The passage in Matthew above speaks of alms, that I understand. Yet there is a place in the believers life, that he (or she) are to go about quietly doing good to others, without fanfare or acknowledgement. Not as a showy, attention grabbing televangelist, seeking honor and glory for his own ministry, but quietly doing good to others, because it is their nature to do good to others.

Jesus did (does) good all the time. In front of friends and enemies, many and few, rich and poor, healthy and sick. He is good, it is His very nature! Out of His nature, His holy and loving character, flows acts of mercy and kindness that we are recipients of.

Do you recognize this in our Savior? Is He One who turns up in quiet areas of your life, performing good deeds quietly, seeking to minister in ways that few may not see or notice?

Be like Him. He is good.


Thanks again for coming to visit. I hope you found something of interest in this post and would appreciate a comment, to begin a discussion.

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Miracles · Supernatural

Signs and Mighty Works of Jesus #3 – Jesus Drives Out an Evil Spirit

After my series on the parables, I found I was drawn to look into the miracles of Jesus in the Gospels. I have never studies the mighty works of Jesus as a focused effort before and am looking forward to finding nuggets of truth that we can be encouraged by.

I have provided a general introduction, with an opportunity to download two files for your reference in my initial post Signs and Mighty Works of Jesus – Introduction. I found that the format I used for the parable posts were useful to keep me on track, and will continue to use them for this series, with some minor tweaks.

With that said, let’s take a look at our third mighty work of Jesus

Jesus Drives Out an Evil Spirit

Mark 1:21-27

And they went into Capernaum, and immediately on the Sabbath he entered the synagogue and was teaching. And they were astonished at his teaching, for he taught them as one who had authority, and not as the scribes. And immediately there was in their synagogue a man with an unclean spirit. And he cried out, “What have you to do with us, Jesus of Nazareth? Have you come to destroy us? I know who you are–the Holy One of God.” But Jesus rebuked him, saying, “Be silent, and come out of him!” And the unclean spirit, convulsing him and crying out with a loud voice, came out of him. And they were all amazed, so that they questioned among themselves, saying, “What is this? A new teaching with authority! He commands even the unclean spirits, and they obey him.”

Luke also provides a record of this mighty work.

Luke 4:31-36

And he went down to Capernaum, a city of Galilee. And he was teaching them on the Sabbath, and they were astonished at his teaching, for his word possessed authority. And in the synagogue there was a man who had the spirit of an unclean demon, and he cried out with a loud voice, “Ha! What have you to do with us, Jesus of Nazareth? Have you come to destroy us? I know who you are–the Holy One of God.” But Jesus rebuked him, saying, “Be silent and come out of him!” And when the demon had thrown him down in their midst, he came out of him, having done him no harm. And they were all amazed and said to one another, “What is this word? For with authority and power he commands the unclean spirits, and they come out!”

General Observations

Two items in this passage jump out to me.

First, this passage is about authority. The authority of Jesus in His words and works. Both the words of Jesus, in His teaching, and the actions He takes in His healing of this demoniac demonstrate that this humble rabbi is much more than a humble rabbi.

Secondly, as a young believer, this passage caused me a bit of confusion. If the possessed man is speaking the truth, why would the Lord of truth rebuke him and tell him to be silent?

Questions to Consider

Who were the audience?

Of course, the disciples were present. Additional witnesses this this mighty work would include those who were in the audience, observant Jews, in synagogue for the sabbath, seeking to obey God’s call on their life.

Little did they know that God was going to show up that day!

When did the Lord perform this miracle?

See https://www.bibletimelines.net/timelines/jesus-ministry

Where did the Lord perform this miracle?

See Signs and Mighty Works of Jesus – Introduction for downloadable reference file.

Why did the Lord perform this miracle?

A difficult question, for He may have simply sought to rescue this demon possessed man, or at the least remove the this disturbance in the synagogue. After all, the synagogue was a sanctified building!

I think the last phrase gives us a hint as to the reason this mighty work was performed, for the miracle supported the authority of His words, giving those who heard Him an encouragement to follow Him, or conversely, a reason to persecute Him. How often it is that it is either the one or the other.

Notice the first reference of authority in this passage, where the audience speaks of the Lord teaching “as One who had authority”, that He was not referring to other men’s teaching as the scribes would. It was common practice for the average scribe to depend on past authorities, men who had also depended on past authorities.

We know that Jesus depended on the Word of God for His foundation of teaching, and His interpretation of the Old Testament Scriptures continually shocked His audience. The issue of Him not depending on past teachers, and being in sync (fully) with the Old Testament, must have been shocking to His audience.

When He performed His mighty work, this dependence on the singular Word of God, this “teaching as one who had authority”, was reinforced, and the opinion of the audience changed. This teaching was with authority! He didn’t simply appear to be “One who had authority”, but this rabbi possessed authority!

As my momma used to say, He walked the talk!

What was the message for the original audience?

The message for the original audience was that the One who was present had authority, not like the scribes, not like the teachers of the day, not like anyone else.

Thinking about this might work, it provided a number of messages to the original audience. As mentioned , those in attendance changed their opinion of the Masters teaching and ministry. They saw proof of His authority, and were not simply surprised. Mark 1:22 & Luke 4:32 both speak of His audience being “astonished” at His teaching. This word speaks of being struck with amazement. Of being shocked, even to a point of panic.

After the mighty work was performed, both writers used a different term, a term that describes the effect of the miracle to include fear. The audience were amazed at this miracle, and that amazement included the element of fear. The audience was frightened.

Of course, having a demoniac enter the sanctified area of a synagogue would be frightening to the average attendant. One who had greater authority than the demon would also incur greater fear. Who was this Rabbi?

What is the message for us today?

Who do you consider authoritative? I have spent much of my life referring to commentaries for understanding the words of Scripture, and I am thankful for the teaching they have provided. The teaching of the saints are a treasure trove of learning.

The issue is that I need to consider the teaching of past and present saints for what it is, and that the only real authority is the Lord Jesus. We are not to fall into the same trap that the scribes fell into, and that is they “depended” on past teachers, that “depended” on past teachers, that “depended” on past teachers. The source of the “teaching” was lost in dilution and the teaching being provided to the masses became a monster on it’s own.

To simply read, study, memorize and seek to understand the Living Word is one of the greatest challenges a present saint can venture into. To be sure, to seek to depend only on the Word is full of pitfalls and will induce periods of uncertainty, since we may find truths in the Word that go against our current denominational stance.

Fear not, study and search the Scripture and stand on the Word, gracefully speaking the truth in love. Finding truth from the Word and bellowing it out to all in an attitude of pride and arrogance is one of the pitfalls I can attest to. I need to constantly remind myself to walk humbly with the Lord, and exercise mercy and love towards those I am privileged to rub shoulders with.

One other truth is important, and I referred to earlier as an issue of confusion for myself as a young believer. Why would the Lord stop the declaration of the demoniac’s message.

Is not Jesus the Holy One of God? Did He not come to destroy the power of the devil? Of course these statements are true. So why did the Master command this man to be silent?

Was it too early for this truth to come out? Jesus had earlier visited Samaria, and had openly identified Himself to the woman at the well. The truth of Jesus identity had been given out to the Samaritans by this time.

Ok, so was it the audience, faithful Jews, that were not be be informed of this fact at this time? Was it too early for the religious Jew to hear the truth? Again, I am not convinced this was the reason, for at the baptism of Jesus, a voice from heaven revealed that this humble rabbi was God’s beloved Son.

So why did the Master tell this demoniac to shut up? A wonderful message needs a clean vessel to come from.

Therefore, if anyone cleanses himself from what is dishonorable, he will be a vessel for honorable use, set apart as holy, useful to the master of the house, ready for every good work. – 2 Timothy 2:21

Although the truth came out of this demoniac, it actually damaged the message, in that all knew the demoniac was of the dark side, associated with violence, fear, lies and hatred. The message of the Lord Jesus is not to be associated with these characteristics. This is a great challenge for us who seek to represent our Lord Jesus properly.

A corollary truth also comes out of this for myself, in that I have fallen in my walk with the Lord far to often. But it is important to realize that a clean vessel does not equal a perfect vessel, or a vessel that does not need cleaning occasionally.

To be a clean vessel includes the concept of continual cleansing, as our passage in 2 Timothy informs us. Spend some time today alone with Him, and as the Lord speaks to you of areas in your life that are in opposition to His will, confess this sin, and if necessary, go to the one who you may have a strained relationship with, ask forgiveness, and seek to restore your peace with them, (if possible). Exercise humility, and a spirit of meekness, which is required for the believer to imitate, since the Master Himself is gentle and lowly in heart.

Take my yoke upon you, and learn from me, for I am gentle and lowly in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. – Matthew 11:29 ESV

A doctrinally pure message out of a defiled (proud) vessel may actually be an affront to our Master. Consider!

Thanks again for coming to visit. I hope you found something of interest in this post and would appreciate a comment, to begin a discussion.

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Miracles · Supernatural

Signs and Mighty Works of Jesus #2 – Jesus Heals an Official’s Son

After my series on the parables, I found I was drawn to look into the miracles of Jesus in the Gospels. I have never studies the mighty works of Jesus as a focused effort before and am looking forward to finding nuggets of truth that we can be encouraged by.

I have provided a general introduction, with an opportunity to download two files for your reference in my initial post Signs and Mighty Works of Jesus – Introduction. I found that the format I used for the parable posts were useful to keep me on track, and will continue to use them for this series, with some minor tweaks. With that said, let’s take a look at

Jesus Heals an Official’s Son

John 4:43-54

After the two days he departed for Galilee. (For Jesus himself had testified that a prophet has no honor in his own hometown.) So when he came to Galilee, the Galileans welcomed him, having seen all that he had done in Jerusalem at the feast. For they too had gone to the feast. So he came again to Cana in Galilee, where he had made the water wine. And at Capernaum there was an official whose son was ill. When this man heard that Jesus had come from Judea to Galilee, he went to him and asked him to come down and heal his son, for he was at the point of death. So Jesus said to him, “Unless you see signs and wonders you will not believe.” The official said to him, “Sir, come down before my child dies.” Jesus said to him, “Go; your son will live.” The man believed the word that Jesus spoke to him and went on his way. As he was going down, his servants met him and told him that his son was recovering. So he asked them the hour when he began to get better, and they said to him, “Yesterday at the seventh hour the fever left him.” The father knew that was the hour when Jesus had said to him, “Your son will live.” And he himself believed, and all his household. This was now the second sign that Jesus did when he had come from Judea to Galilee.

General Observations

I have not included the earlier portion of John 4, since it does not directly relate to this second miracle, but the context of the chapter is relevant in relation the Jesus’ remarks to the official. He had just come out of Samaria, where no miracles were performed. No mighty works. No eye popping actions that would excite the surrounding people. None of that. He had revealed Himself to a poor adulterous Samaritan woman, (A Samaritan woman!) and the town eventually came to trust Him as the Savior of the World. This is truly an amazing story, and I will not spend our time rehashing my thoughts. If interested, please see Simple Thoughts – Savior of the World

Questions to Consider

Who were the audience?

Jesus spoke to the official in response to his request, but in verse 47, Jesus said to him (and the surrounding crowd – the “you” in verse 47 is plural!) that the only way to get faith out of these people appears to be miracles.

What a contrast with the dirty Samaritans Jesus had just departed from!

Jesus had performed one miracle in Cana, and that was not a highly publicized one, since it was only known to a select few. Yet the requests began. We have a miracle worker in our midst! What do I need? What can I get?

When did the Lord perform this miracle?

See https://www.bibletimelines.net/timelines/jesus-ministry

Where did the Lord perform this miracle?

See Signs and Mighty Works of Jesus – Introduction for downloadable reference file.

Why did the Lord perform this miracle?

This is a hard question for me since the Lord may granted this miracle for the man, but He also understood His audience, that they were looking for eye candy. This, as we shall see throughout the miracles is a recurring theme.

Those who had the greatest revelation of God in the history of mankind, were the ones who needed the signs and miracle to initiate faith. Paul actually summarizes this condition in 1 Corinthians 1:22

For Jews demand signs and Greeks seek wisdom, – 1 Corinthians 1:22

The purpose of signs and miracles were discussed in the introduction to this series, and it may be profitable to review occasionally the reasons the miracles were given.

One of the reasons Jesus performed miracles was to extract faith in His words from those who were present. It seems to me He provided miracles throughout His ministry to either fulfill prophecy, directing attention to the person of prophecy hopefully, or to give supporting authority to His words.

The miracles were not an end to themselves. For this particular miracle, no one in the audience “saw” anything. His words were to be believed (which the official claimed) or they were to be ignored. The servants back home saw the fever break, but had no knowledge of the interaction between the official and the Lord.

This statement from the Lord Go; your son will live was all that Jesus provided the official. What did the man do? Did he demand the Master come down, beg for a visual proof, seek some type of validation? It seems the man accepted the words of Jesus.

The man believed the word that Jesus spoke to him and went on his way

The official turned on his heels, and headed home, believing the words of Jesus. He left the crowd, all alone with his faith in the words of Jesus, walking back to his home. The next day, the servants and the official met and the miracle became evident to all. In between his departure from Jesus, and meeting his servants, this official only had the words of Jesus to cling to.

What was the message for the original audience?

The message for the original audience?

Unless you see signs and wonders you will not believe.

In Texas, where we have lived for the last couple decades, they have a way of defining the size of a group. If I am speaking to one person, I refer to “you”. If I am speaking to more than one person, I would refer to “y’all”. But if I am wanting to include everyone that is listening to my thoughts, I would refer to “all y’all”.

The term “you” in the above passage is the plural, and in the Texas vernacular, would be something like

Unless y’all see signs and wonders y’all will not believe.

Remember that this is spoken amongst the inhabitants of Capernaum, a city that will not fare well in the gospels. Later on in the gospels, Capernaum comes under the Lord’s judgement, even being compared against Sodom and Gomorrah!

And you, Capernaum, will you be exalted to heaven? You will be brought down to Hades. For if the mighty works done in you had been done in Sodom, it would have remained until this day.
But I tell you that it will be more tolerable on the day of judgment for the land of Sodom than for you.” – Mat 11:23-24

This is incredible!

The message to the original audience in Capernaum was one of judgement, of warning. The Messiah had been revealed to the Samaritans though a message only, and immediately after, the Master faced a request for a miracle. Did the Capernaum inhabitants know of the harvest in Samaria? Highly unlikely in my thinking, but that is irrelevant to the response of the Capernaumites. (Is that a word?)

Jesus, in His human understanding, was seeing a pattern emerge (I speak as a fool here!) The Samaritans and Capernaum inhabitants were both in the promised land, and had connections with Moses and the covenant. Both referred to at least portions of the Old Testament for their religious foundation. (The Samaritans seemed to depend only on the first five books of the Law.)

The religious leadership of Israel depended on the whole of the Old Testament, and generally looked down on those Samaritans. The general attitude of the religious leadership in Israel was that the Samaritans were an adulterated bunch of impure, mixed race inhabitants, defiling the land. Only the pure Jew was acceptable to the God of Israel. Only the pure Jew!

How upside down is that?

What is the message for us today?

Are you of a pure faith? Are you doctrinally pure, without error, and exercise a ministry of “debate” on all who do not agree with you. Do you demand proofs before you believe? Do you seek to “help” those who cannot see the truth, claiming you understand the revelation of God.

In other words, do you live in pride? Would you identify with the dirty Samaritans or the pure Jew?

Simple faith is dependent on His words. As mentioned above, as this man walked home, he may have experienced doubt and fears, recalled whispers or mockings as he left the crowd. It was surely a long walk home with his thoughts, and the words of Jesus were all he could depend on. Definitely a good place to be!

Only Jesus’ words!


Thanks again for coming to visit. I hope you found something of interest in this post and would appreciate a comment, to begin a discussion.

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Miracles · Supernatural

Signs and Mighty Works of Jesus – Introduction

After my series on the parables, I found I was drawn back to the gospels to look into the miracles of Jesus. As our introductory post into this topic, I would like to offer some definitions, two downloadable files, and a quick review of why the miracles of Jesus were provided.

Definitions

I found two words that refer to the “miracles” recorded in the New Testament by the Lord Jesus. If you would like to check out the lexicons, get verse lists etc., please use the links provided below.

Our first Greek term is sēmeion, usually translated as miracle or sign. John really likes this term!

A second Greek word dynamis is commonly translated as works, or mighty works and is the default term used to describe what we call a miracle.

Why Miracles were provided?

Why did Jesus perform such signs and mighty works? Well, there are a number of answers to this question, some familiar and some not so much. Consider the following.

To Fulfill Prophecy

This was to fulfill what was spoken by the prophet Isaiah: “He took our illnesses and bore our diseases.” Matthew 8:17

To Give Authority to His Words

And when Jesus finished these sayings, the crowds were astonished at his teaching, for he was teaching them as one who had authority, and not as their scribes. Matthew 7:28-29

But that you may know that the Son of Man has authority on earth to forgive sins”–he then said to the paralytic–“Rise, pick up your bed and go home.” Matthew 9:6

To Exhibit His Compassion

When he went ashore he saw a great crowd, and he had compassion on them and healed their sick. Matthew 14:14

When he came down from the mountain, great crowds followed him. And behold, a leper came to him and knelt before him, saying, “Lord, if you will, you can make me clean.” And Jesus stretched out his hand and touched him, saying, “I will; be clean.” And immediately his leprosy was cleansed. And Jesus said to him, “See that you say nothing to anyone, but go, show yourself to the priest and offer the gift that Moses commanded, for a proof to them.” Matthew 8:1-4,

To Believe His Words

If I am not doing the works of my Father, then do not believe me; but if I do them, even though you do not believe me, believe the works, that you may know and understand that the Father is in me and I am in the Father.” John 10:37-38  

Why Miracles were not Provided

To satisfy a fleshly desire

But he answered them, “An evil and adulterous generation seeks for a sign, but no sign will be given to it except the sign of the prophet Jonah. Matthew 12:39

So Jesus said to him, “Unless you see signs and wonders you will not believe.” John 4:48

File Download

In the following downloadable files, you will find gospel narratives of all the miracles for your records and reference. Also, for your convenience, a pdf is available that supplies the miracles in a table format, following the order of our study.

I have also found a timeline that is helpful in relation to when the miracles were performed in His ministry. The file may be found at https://www.bibletimelines.net/timelines/jesus-ministry


Thanks again for coming to visit. I hope you found something of interest in this post and would appreciate a comment, to begin a discussion. If you would like to receive daily posts from Considering the Bible, click on the “Follow” link below

Thanks again for coming to visit. I hope you found something of interest in this post and would appreciate a comment, to begin a discussion.

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Miracles · Supernatural

Signs and Mighty Works of Jesus #1 – Jesus Turns Water into Wine

After my series on the parables, I found I was drawn to look into the miracles of Jesus in the Gospels. I have never studies the mighty works of Jesus as a focused effort before and am looking forward to finding nuggets of truth that we can be encouraged by.

I have provided a general introduction, with an opportunity to download two files for your reference in my initial post Signs and Mighty Works of Jesus – Introduction. I found that the format I used for the parable posts were useful to keep me on track, and will continue to use them for this series, with some minor tweaks.

With that said, let’s take a look at the miracle…

Jesus Turns Water into Wine

John 2:1-11

On the third day there was a wedding at Cana in Galilee, and the mother of Jesus was there. Jesus also was invited to the wedding with his disciples. When the wine ran out, the mother of Jesus said to him, “They have no wine.” And Jesus said to her, “Woman, what does this have to do with me? My hour has not yet come.” His mother said to the servants, “Do whatever he tells you.” Now there were six stone water jars there for the Jewish rites of purification, each holding twenty or thirty gallons. Jesus said to the servants, “Fill the jars with water.” And they filled them up to the brim. And he said to them, “Now draw some out and take it to the master of the feast.” So they took it. When the master of the feast tasted the water now become wine, and did not know where it came from (though the servants who had drawn the water knew), the master of the feast called the bridegroom and said to him, “Everyone serves the good wine first, and when people have drunk freely, then the poor wine. But you have kept the good wine until now.” This, the first of his signs, Jesus did at Cana in Galilee, and manifested his glory. And his disciples believed in him.

Questions to Consider

Who were the audience?

All the wedding guests, along with the mother of Jesus and the disciples. And some forgotten people we may chat about later on in the post. Can you guess who I am intentionally forgetting?

When did the Lord perform this miracle?

See https://www.bibletimelines.net/timelines/jesus-ministry

Where did the Lord perform this miracle?

See Signs and Mighty Works of Jesus – Introduction for downloadable reference file.

Why did the Lord perform this miracle?

It may appear that this miracle was spurred on by the Lord’s mother, and her concern for the reputation of the wedding hosts. She requests her Son for assistance, but He rebuffs her.

This must have been a very rare (in my opinion) act for the Son to “refuse” His mother, but the very next thing we read is that He speaks to the servants to resolve the lack. This is where being there, seeing facial expressions and hearing tonal inflections, would provide understanding of the situation.

Did the Son tell His mother this with a smile? Was He surprised by her request? Was He refusing and then changed His mind?

A few versions I have perused actually expand this response from the Son in the following ways.

Jesus saith to her, ‘What — to me and to thee, woman? – John 2:4 YLT

“What does that have to do with you and me, woman? ” Jesus asked. – John 2:4 CSB

Jesus replied, “Woman, why are you saying this to me? – John 2:4 NET

The message I am starting to understand is that this response had to do with Jesus and Mary’s relationship. The miracle was not in response to obeying the mother, as was His way as He grew up in her household.

No, I think Jesus was trying to identify His relationship with His Father in Heaven, in that the miracle, as it states in verse 11, revealed His glory.

This, the first of his signs, Jesus did at Cana in Galilee, and manifested his glory. – John 2:11 ESV

He was not simply Mary’s son, but the Father’s Son.

What was the message for the original audience?

It appears the miracle was obvious to the disciples, for they believed in Him, as verse 11 speaks, His mother, and one other group, which I mentioned earlier. Have you identified this group?

Verse 9 & 10 shows that the response to the miracle was between the master of the feast and the bridegroom. The text says nothing of anyone approaching Jesus.

….the master of the feast called the bridegroom and said to him, “Everyone serves the good wine first, and when people have drunk freely, then the poor wine. But you have kept the good wine until now.” – John 2:9c-10 ESV

What is the message for us today?

Have you identified the forgotten people, those that also understood who performed the miracle, actually took part in the miracle, and watched from behind the scenes?

The servants. Those that are considered below us were the ones who were involved in this miracle. This fact has always amazed me in that Jesus uses the lowly, the humble, those who have no standing in the society. This is a recurring theme through the gospels, and Jesus Himself identifies Himself as lowly and meek.

This is the primary message I find in this first miracle. A quiet, humble walk with the Lord will allow us to experience miracles that others cannot see or experience.

A loud boisterous, attention grabbing “ministry of miracles”, that seems so popular in today’s church, does not seem to align with the first of Jesus miracles, and may provide instruction for us in the proper identification of true miracles today.

Nevertheless, He is good, and to walk with Him, as servants, is a privilege that we do not deserve, providing us opportunities to see His works in our lives and the lives of those around us.


Thanks again for coming to visit. I hope you found something of interest in this post and would appreciate a comment, to begin a discussion.

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