Psalms for Psome – 7

My wife and I are reading through the Psalms in our evening reading and occasionally a nugget of the Psalms jumps out of the page. Don’t you love it when, after years of reading the “Old Book”, passages come alive, reinforcing old teachings or simply warming your heart.

This is the book of Psalms, and it is rich.

I pray I can communicate a portion of the blessing we receive from this wonderful book.

Its been years since we dealt with Miles. He was a big ol’ fella, our neighbor for about 5 years, and at the start, was pleasant, friendly, aw shucks he was even neighborly.

But something “broke” in Miles, or more likely, his true colors came out, and he started to attack our family. Specifically my sweet wife. My sweet little wife.

Miles eventually poisoned the neighborhood against us, dragged my wife into court, had the police and the RCMP (federal Canadian police – similar to the FBI) come to our door, and berated us on the local radio station.

Meanwhile, in the Simpson home, we were reading through the Old Testament, connecting with David when he was being chased by that King Saul. David never retaliated, threatened or caused Saul any harm. He had opportunity to seek revenge – that is for sure, but he trusted the Lord, which meant no revenge.

Me and that sweeet wife of mine decided to pray and seek no revenge. To be fair, most of this burden fell on my wife since she was a stay at home mom, home schooling our children, and Miles was on disability, at his home all day long. She sought a peaceful life and after close to three years, the Lord delivered us from Miles.

Psalm 7

14 Behold, the wicked man conceives evil and is pregnant with mischief and gives birth to lies.
15 He makes a pit, digging it out, and falls into the hole that he has made.
16 His mischief returns upon his own head, and on his own skull his violence descends.
17 I will give to the LORD the thanks due to his righteousness, and I will sing praise to the name of the LORD, the Most High.

You see, Miles dug a pit for us to fall in, to trap us and to cause us pain. Please do not think that we were without temptations, anger, frustrations and fears. Much frustration!

But the Lord worked it out for Miles to give up, sell his home and move to a new community, which eventually filled up with young families. By the way, did I tell you one of his major complaints were the number of children we had? No? Well, lets just say he didn’t love our youngins, which always shocks me, since they are the bestest youngins!!!

When we look back at that time, I think the Lord also added wee bit of humor to the situation, in that I received a job offer in another city and sold our home just months after he moved. Poor Miles. He loved that home and wanted us to leave so he could have “peace”. Eventually his anger and hatred forced him to give up and move away.

He fell into the hole he dug for us.

Sometimes the Lord just adds a bit extra “justice” to the way He takes care of His people.


Follow Considering the Bible on WordPress.com

Thanks again for coming to visit. I hope you found something of interest in this post and would appreciate a comment, to begin a discussion.

Psalms for Psome – 6

My wife and I are reading through the Psalms in our evening reading and occasionally a nugget of the Psalms jumps out of the page. Don’t you love it when, after years of reading the “Old Book” passages become alive, reinforcing old teachings or simply warming your heart.

This is the book of Psalms, and it is rich.

I pray I can communicate a portion of the blessing we receive from this wonderful book.

In our prayers as believers, we have been given many wonderful promises, promises such as

Hebrews 4:16

Let us then with confidence draw near to the throne of grace, that we may receive mercy and find grace to help in time of need.

The throne of grace, where mercy flows, and help is available. What a fantastic promise to depend on, to believe. This privilege of the believer is a precious truth, one that, I can safely safe many of us do not appreciate fully.

This is a truth that we have constantly, and that as we reach out to the Father is humility and with confession, we can believe we have brought our petitions before Him and that we will receive mercy and help.

This psalm is the first of seven penitential psalms David authored. David was in deep despair and trouble in Psalm 6. He is physically sick and spiritually troubled. He is pleading with God to turn, yet this is a displeasure he has brought upon himself. His sin before God brought this distance and the pain and fear he is experiencing is a grace that God provides to get his attention.

Brother/sister, are you struggling with doubt or despair?

Two thoughts come to mind. The first is the simple decision of the Lord to simply allow us to have a barrenness in our lives, a time of dryness and quietness from the Lord that seems unexplainable. I will confess this has been my experience in the past, and has caused me to search the Word and my relation with Him.

The second, which sadly is the more common for myself at least, is the experience of bring the doubt and despair upon myself. My hardness of heart in listening to the voice of God has caused me to commit sin again Him, either in attitude or actions. I fear we all fall at times in our walk with Him. Have you knowledge of sin against God in your life? This doubt and despair may be a gracious act of God, seeking to get your attention.

David committed sin against the Lord and was in the depths of despair and anguish. He speaks of his end being in Sheol, of his death. His experience is that of life and death. He weeps and wails, seeking relief. In the midst of his grief, David writes the following

Psalm 6:8-9

Depart from me, all you workers of evil, for the LORD has heard the sound of my weeping. The LORD has heard my plea; the LORD accepts my prayer.

Did the weeping and wailing “pay” for his sins, satisfy the Lord and force the Father’s hand in forgiving His child? Some may think this way, but I speculate those who think thus may not have experienced a child’s tears of sorrow.

When one of my children approached me in humble contrition for a wrong they committed against my self, their mother, or worse yet, against themselves, all I could think of are ways to find resolution and to restore what was lost.

Granted, I am a sinner with little wisdom, but I recognize that Jesus often used our experiences to compare and demonstrate the Fathers love for His children. (Take a few moments to consider how often He used our parental experiences as a basis to explain the Father’s greater love for His children.)

David prayed to the Lord, he approached the throne of grace in humility and contrition. He boldly states “The Lord has heard my plea; the Lord accepts my prayer” This is the experience of Hebrews 4.

May we experience that confidence as we seek His pleasure.


Follow Considering the Bible on WordPress.com

Thanks again for coming to visit. I hope you found something of interest in this post and would appreciate a comment, to begin a discussion.

Let Me Tell You a Story – The Blizzard of ’21

let-me-tell-you-a-story.jpg

It was a quiet Saturday, but little did we know what lay ahead for us for the next few days. 

Yes, I am referring to the blizzard of ’21, where we received up to 2″ of snow, temperatures that plummeted to 16 degrees Fahrenheit, and a complete shutdown of the power grid, along with the resultant darkness, loss of heat and breaking water pipes.

As a Canadian who has lived through minus 40 degree weather,  experienced 2 or more feet of snow (in one “dump”), and experienced 6 months of winter, year in and year out, it became apparent once again the blessing of living in Houston.

But Carl – you were without power for over 52 hours, a water pipe in your attic burst, with water gushing out, tearing up both the second and first floor ceilings, and you woke with the house temperature barely above 40 degrees.  Two days of 8 blankets on the bed, reading during the day, and finding ways to charge your phone for communication .  Two days where we had no distractions, where my wife and I were confined to our bed to stay warm.  Two days of considering our situation.  Two days of being still.

You see, we are a blessed people, and I will readily admit we had what amounts to a minor inconvenience.  We heard reports of horrendous experiences of folks during this blizzard.  Some folk died during this trial, and we are so sorry to hear of this tragedy.

When trials come into your life, many distractions can accompany the struggle.  At one point in our two day trouble, I began to consider this as an opportunity.  What could I do, other than to be with my wife, to be quiet, and (eventually) to be thankful for the mercies we experience every day.

I do hope those who may be reading this have not suffered from the cold snap we experienced, or from other trials recently.  If so, and you would allow us to pray for you, please do not hesitate to share via the comment box below.

Thanks muchly and have a blessed day walking with the Savior.

Follow Considering the Bible on WordPress.com

Psalms for Psome – 5

My wife and I are reading through the Psalms in our evening reading and occasionally a nugget of the Psalms jumps out of the page. Don’t you love it when, after years of reading the “Old Book” passages become alive, reinforcing old teachings or simply warming your heart.

This is the book of Psalms, and it is rich.

I pray I can communicate a portion of the blessing we receive from this wonderful book.

Psalm 5:1

To the choirmaster: for the flutes. A Psalm of David.

Give ear to my words, O LORD; consider my groaning.

In the old KJV, the last word is translated as meditation, and having spent a considerable time in the authorized version, it is how I have understood this verse. I considered it to have a positive connotation about it, that is, to meditate meant to think on the things of God in a methodical, unhurried praiseworthy manner.

Reading the ESV version above makes me reconsider. The word has a number of definitions, including “musings”, “meditation”, even “complaint”. Gesenius’ Hebrew-Chaldee Lexicon speaks of this term as from a Hebrew root word meaning “heat, fervor of mind”

This sheds a bit different light on the passage for me. Is David bringing his complaints to the Lord? Is this an acceptable way to approach the Creator and Savior?

Let me share a verse that has always shocked me when I read it. Of course, I am not in the same situation as Jeremiah, seeing his beloved country being run over by the enemy, and his countrymen becoming hardened to the call of repentance toward God. But this verse has always intrigued me.

Jeremiah 12:1

Righteous are you, O LORD, when I complain to you; yet I would plead my case before you. Why does the way of the wicked prosper? Why do all who are treacherous thrive?

It appears that coming to the Lord includes the freedom to express our concerns and complaints. It is good to remember that Jeremiah approached the Lord as such, but did not remain in this attitude.

Such was the fate of David by the time he concluded his musings of the fifth Psalm.

My wife an I have noticed that in the Psalms, as the author may start out with a concern, a complaint or a question, by the time he gets to the end of the psalm, it is resolved, or at least the author is at peace, with praise flowing from his pen to the Lord.

Psalm 5:11 – 12

But let all who take refuge in you rejoice; let them ever sing for joy, and spread your protection over them, that those who love your name may exult in you.
For you bless the righteous, O LORD; you cover him with favor as with a shield.

Questions, complaints, concerns, problems, setbacks, dilemmas, hassles and predicaments are decision points in our lives. We can sit in the problem, suffering the impact of the negative, or go to the Lord, express our concern or trials to Him who has suffered all trials, and humbly receive the correct perspective on life, renewing our mind to think properly, soberly and righteously, that is, of a servant.

Thanks for dropping by Considering the Bible and spending a few moments with me. Please leave a comment if you have a moment. Have a blessed day.


Follow Considering the Bible on WordPress.com

Thanks again for coming to visit. I hope you found something of interest in this post and would appreciate a comment, to begin a discussion.

Psalms for Psome – 4

My wife and I are reading through the Psalms in our evening reading and occasionally a nugget of the Psalms jumps out of the page. Don’t you love it when, after years of reading the “Old Book” passages become alive, reinforcing old teachings or simply warming your heart.

This is the book of Psalms, and it is rich.

I pray I can communicate a portion of the blessing we receive from this wonderful book.

I had a teacher who once told me that I should never identify as the hero as I read a Bible passage. Look for the bad guy and identify with him.

It made sense since we all have a streak of evil in us, and that is the corrupting influence we fight against each day. One of the strengths of this evil in us, is the power it receives by going unnoticed, ignored or downplayed. It loves to hide behind a self righteous attitude of judgement and high estimation of self. Of course, I love it when I feel like I am righteous, feel the glory of my self, and not of the goodness of God.

It is truly a fine line to walk, understanding my own weakness, and the strength of the Lord, my own corruption and the life of a resurrected Savior, my own sin and the righteousness of God, my own ignorance and the wisdom He can provide.

When we read the following verse, I automatically did not associate with the author. I immediately considered Jesus, reading this passage, and identifying with the author, only in His situation, it was an absolute reflection of His condition.

Psalm 4:2

O men, how long shall my honor be turned into shame?
How long will you love vain words and seek after lies? Selah

His honor was turned to shame on that fateful day. Every day up to that day, He suffered indignities and slights, doubting and mocking, shame heaped on Him out of jealousy and hatred.

But alas, I may have mis-spoke.

On the cross, His glory shone out, in radiance, for us that have seen the truth.

Who would give like He did? Who would accept the shame in order to lift a weak, dirty soul out of the pit? Who would bear under the vain words of liars and cheats, in order to give them truth and grace?

No – He was most glorious on the cross, for those who would ponder the extremes He suffered under, and to the purposes He sought to achieve. He satisfied His Father, loved His people and turned everything upside down.

Praise Him for His most wonderful life!


Follow Considering the Bible on WordPress.com

Thanks again for coming to visit. I hope you found something of interest in this post and would appreciate a comment, to begin a discussion.

Let Me Tell You a Story – Division

let-me-tell-you-a-story.jpg

Let me settle your fears right away. The division I speak of is not the mathy kind, but of division amongst Christians. But I am getting ahead of myself.

A few days ago,  I entered into a discussion with a superior at my office, and we eventually chatted about church, and spoke of the Lord Jesus.  I was mildly surprised by this since I wasn’t sure of where he stood in relation to the Lord.  To be honest, I am still not sure, but that is something I don’t have to worry about since I am not his judge.  I do hope I can speak of Him more often with my superior.

The story I want to share has a sadness about it, that I’m afraid many, if not all that read have had some experience with. 

During our chat, he mentioned that the church he attends was allowing musical instruments during one of the main services, and that this was causing much concern among some of the parishioners.  I expressed my shock that this would become a sticking point within the congregation, and he continued sharing of another church from his youth.  

The body of believers at the time decided to consider allowing instruments into the worship service, and the fallout was a complete church split.  Hundreds of believers torn away from brothers and sisters. How sad to hear of a passion to “be biblical”, and yet not exercise love for their brother and sister.  

John 13:34-35

A new commandment I give unto you, That ye love one another; as I have loved you, that ye also love one another. By this shall all men know that ye are my disciples, if ye have love one to another.

Somewhat shortsighted, possibly even a bit blind may I suggest?

2 Peter 1:5 – 19

For this very reason, make every effort to supplement your faith with virtue, and virtue with knowledge, and knowledge with self-control, and self-control with steadfastness, and steadfastness with godliness, and godliness with brotherly affection, and brotherly affection with love.
For if these qualities are yours and are increasing, they keep you from being ineffective or unfruitful in the knowledge of our Lord Jesus Christ. For whoever lacks these qualities is so nearsighted that he is blind, having forgotten that he was cleansed from his former sins.

It is easy to point fingers at believers decades ago that suffered through a church split due to a divisive spirit, but what of us? Do we seek to find differences between our brothers and sisters, or do we seek to find the one similarity, the one unifying truth that we all need to focus on.

He is the One we are to seek after. Can you love a brother or sister that has a different perspective than yourself? Can you find fellowship with a believer of another teaching?

Remember, the commandment was to love one another, not necessarily agree with one another. His disciples came from extremely different occupations, from fishermen to tax collectors to zealots. These are surely strange “bedfellows” and yet they were specifically chosen by the Father to exhibit a microcosm of the church.

Try to understand your brother and sister in the Lord, and look beyond the noise to love the person for whom Christ died. The alternate isn’t good news!

Galatians 5:15

But if you bite and devour one another, watch out that you are not consumed by one another.

Thanks for dropping by Considering the Bible. Hope you found encouragement and a bit of a challenge. Please leave a comment if you have a few moments to share.


Follow Considering the Bible on WordPress.com

Psalms for Psome – 3

My wife and I are reading through the Psalms in our evening reading and occasionally a nugget of the Psalms jumps out of the page. Don’t you love it when, after years of reading the “Old Book” passages become alive, reinforcing old teachings or simply warming your heart.

This is the book of Psalms, and it is rich.

I pray I can communicate a portion of the blessing we receive from this wonderful book.


Psalm 3:5-6

I lay down and slept; I woke again, for the LORD sustained me.
I will not be afraid of many thousands of people who have set themselves against me all around.

We had five chillun, and I remember using this verse occasionally to speak of sleeping with one of my chillun. It was an effort to help this youngin find some peace.

The actual recounting of this story is much more than settling a child’s fear of the dark.

King David was on the run. His subjects were turncoats, or at least every one of them suspect. Shimei cursed him as he fled from his city, the city of David. His trusted advisor, Ahithophel, an anti-type of Judas, turned traitor. His son, Absalom was leading the revolt against David.

Yet David states

I lay down and slept; I woke again, for the Lord sustained me

In the tsunami of upheaval that David was experiencing, he slept. He slept.

David went to sleep that night, thinking he may not wake up. He could be the target for assassination, the final blow that could cement Absolam as King of Israel. But David slept.

Another saint fell asleep prior to “certain” death.

Acts 12:7

And behold, an angel of the Lord stood next to him, and a light shone in the cell. He struck Peter on the side and woke him, saying, “Get up quickly.” And the chains fell off his hands.

Peter, in the 12 chapter of Acts, had been arrested. Herod, seeing that the death of James pleased the Jews, was on a potential killing streak, and had scheduled Peter’s execution for the next day. But God had different plans for His man. He sent an angle, that had to kick the apostle awake.

David slept when being chased by his own son. Peter slept when a murderous king had plans on him.

There may be a time when a crisis hits our lives brothers. Peaceful sleep is possible, since it is the Lord that sustains us.

May God be pleased to strengthen our hearts and minds.


Follow Considering the Bible on WordPress.com

Thanks again for coming to visit. I hope you found something of interest in this post and would appreciate a comment, to begin a discussion.

Psalms for Psome – Psalm 2

My wife and I are reading through the Psalms in our evening reading and occasionally a nugget of the Psalms jumps out of the page. Don’t you love it when, after years of reading the “Old Book” passages become alive, reinforcing old teachings or simply warming your heart.

This is the book of Psalms, and it is rich.

I pray I can communicate a portion of the blessing we received from this wonderful book.

Knowing we were going to be reading Psalm 2 this evening, I figgered I was ready to discuss, given that I had read this psalm as much as any.

Little did I know that one more time would give me more to be thankful for, and also add a question or two to consider.

Psalm 2

1 Why do the nations rage
and the peoples plot in vain?
2 The kings of the earth set themselves,
and the rulers take counsel together,
against the LORD and against his Anointed, saying,
3 “Let us burst their bonds apart
and cast away their cords from us.”

It seems so obvious to me that the passage here speaks of the rejection and crucifixion of the Lord Jesus.

Verse 2 speaks of the rulers and the kings counselling together. I take that as the joining of the Jewish leadership and the Gentile lords coming together to reject God. This is a common theme through the Word, where sworn enemies join forces when it comes to fighting against the Creator and Redeemer of all. (Consider Herod and Pilate)

Luke 23:12

And Herod and Pilate became friends with each other that very day, for before this they had been at enmity with each other.

It is sobering to realize that those who are against the Lord will team up with absolutely anyone to fight against God.

 
4 He who sits in the heavens laughs;
the Lord holds them in derision.
5 Then he will speak to them in his wrath,
and terrify them in his fury, saying,
6 “As for me, I have set my King
on Zion, my holy hill.”

The enemy has a united front. The motivation for confrontation is high. The forces against God seem insurmountable. (At least from our perspective.)

But God has set His King on His holy hill.

But when did this happen? When did God set His King on His holy hill? I used to think that He will be enthroned during the millennial Kingdom in the future. Not so sure anymore. There is much debate over this, but as my wife and I chatted, we considered Hebrews 12:22, where the author refers to believers coming (or having come) to Mount Zion.

Heb 12:22

But you have come to Mount Zion and to the city of the living God, the heavenly Jerusalem, and to innumerable angels in festal gathering,

Jesus is the King now. Let us not forget that He is on the throne.

Mat 28:18

And Jesus came and said to them, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me.

Sinful actions, evil men and corrupt systems do not frustrate the sovereignty of the Lord Jesus.


7 I will tell of the decree:
The LORD said to me, “You are my Son;
today I have begotten you.
8 Ask of me, and I will make the nations your heritage,
and the ends of the earth your possession.
9 You shall break them with a rod of iron
and dash them in pieces like a potter’s vessel.”

This next set of verses are the ones that I intended to discuss with this post, but the earlier ones were too tempting to let go without a bit of comment.

Nevertheless, it is good to remember that the apostles gave us much to consider when they supplied the Spirit’s interpretation of verse 7 in Acts 13:32 – 34

Acts 13:32-34

And we bring you the good news that what God promised to the fathers,
this he has fulfilled to us their children by raising Jesus, as also it is written in the second Psalm, “‘You are my Son, today I have begotten you.’
And as for the fact that he raised him from the dead, no more to return to corruption, he has spoken in this way, “‘I will give you the holy and sure blessings of David.’

So often I consider the term “begotten” to refer to being born, as in my son was begotten of my wife and I. The apostle corrects this thinking by informing us that the Psalm refers to the resurrection of the Lord.

This psalm speaks of the resurrections of the Lord Jesus and His triumph over the forces arrayed against His Father

10 Now therefore, O kings, be wise;
be warned, O rulers of the earth.
11 Serve the LORD with fear,
and rejoice with trembling.
12 Kiss the Son,
lest he be angry, and you perish in the way,
for his wrath is quickly kindled.
Blessed are all who take refuge in him.

Consider the mercy of God, in that after the resurrection, and by that I mean after the crucifixion and torture inflicted by the kings and rulers, they are entreated to serve the Lord with fear, and to rejoice with trembling

He is not a God I can imagine! He is much more!


Follow Considering the Bible on WordPress.com

Thanks again for coming to visit. I hope you found something of interest in this post and would appreciate a comment, to begin a discussion.

Psalms for Psome – Psalm 1

My wife and I are reading through the Psalms in our evening reading and occasionally a nugget of the Psalms jumps out of the page. Don’t you love it when, after years of reading the “Old Book” passages become alive, reinforcing old teachings or simply warming your heart.

This is the book of Psalms, and it is rich.

I pray I can communicate a portion of the blessing we receive from this wonderful book.

Psams 1:3


He is like a tree
planted by streams of water
that yields its fruit in its season,
and its leaf does not wither.
In all that he does, he prospers.

Often in our Christian lives, we stumble through life with little fruit. At least in the day to day fruit bearing of patience, faithfulness and love, the base level of the Christian life is exercised. It is the “normal” Christian life.

Yet this passage speaks of the believers life as having seasons of fruit bearing. The leaf never withers, but the fruit comes in it’s season.

The Psalm speaks of the leaf/life as always vibrant, not withering. The joy peace and self control are evidence of life, and yet the tree yields it’s fruit in its season.

This is encouraging, very encouraging in that our day to day fellowship with Him will be punctuated with seasons of fruit bearing.

The opposite is true though, and we need to continue to be near the streams of living water when the fruit isn’t in it’s season. Sometimes, as the dust that we are, this can be discouraging.

Are you in a “dry” spell with the Lord? Is there a quietness from Him, or maybe you are not experiencing a fruitfulness that you long for?

Get back to the water, the living water and be patient. Let Him who controls the seasons, produce the fruit and the timing of the fruit.


Follow Considering the Bible on WordPress.com

Thanks again for coming to visit. I hope you found something of interest in this post and would appreciate a comment, to begin a discussion.

Let Me Tell You a Story – Pleasing God

let-me-tell-you-a-story.jpg

Jim attended a church we visited years back, and his infectious hospitality drew us in. We stayed in the church for years and developed a great friendship with Jim and his family.

Eventually, our family moved to the US, and he continued in Canada. We lost contact for years, and recently another brother from Canada let me know that Jim had passed away.

The memory of Jim, along with his happy demeanor and engaging smile, brought back a number of times we spent together.

Jim loved to golf. I had recently purchased a computer game called “Links 360”, and being in Canada, the golfing season was severely restricted (unless you used orange golf balls!) We invited Jim and his family over for supper one Sunday night, and I showed him the game. He was captivated. We spent hours playing the game, and Jim eventually bought the computer the game was on. I tell you he loved to play computer golf!

Another time we got together was to study the Bible. A number of times, we would be reading and the Lord seemed to impress on our minds and hearts certain truths that one of us needed to hear. One specific time, we were reading through the book of 1 Thessalonians, beginning in the 4th chapter.

1 Thessalonians 4:1

Furthermore then we beseech you, brethren, and exhort you by the Lord Jesus, that as ye have received of us how ye ought to walk and to please God, so ye would abound more and more.

I can’t remember which one of us hung on the phrase “to please God”, but as we considered the phrase, we experienced a renewed hope that we weren’t simply trying to appease an angry God, but that God was willing (and able) to be pleased.

To please God.

Who would have thought that the gospel would provide a possibility of such magnitude to the saint. Of course, we understood the Son was fully pleasing to the Father at all times until the crucifixion, where the Father turned away from His Son.

This is an unfathomable truth for me.

As a matter of fact, the truth of the Father turning away from the Son is far and away a greater truth than the resultant hope of the saint being pleasing unto God. Yes – that is true – the hope of the saint being pleasing to the Father is based on the Only Begotten being abandoned, left to die alone and under the weight of our sin.

He is worthy of all honor and glory, for Who is like unto Thee O Lord?

I am looking forward to visiting with you Jim. It has been decades since we had that study, and I remember the table we were at, the room we were in, and the fellowship we experienced together.

Thanks for being a friend.

Follow Considering the Bible on WordPress.com

Let Me Tell You a Story – Barnabas and his Field

let-me-tell-you-a-story.jpg

I have been a believer for nearly 40 years and it amazes me how little I know of the Word.

Many times the Lord reminds me of my pride and arrogance, and the most recent experience was a few nights ago when my favorite wife and I were reading Acts chapter 4 together. During our reading, as we came to the end of the chapter, Luke writes that Joseph – otherwise known as Barnabas, “sells a field.”

For some reason, I was under the impression he sold everything he owned.  He simply sold a field.  Now I am not denigrating his act of love for the Lord and His followers, I am simply expressing my assumptions that were wrong.

No comment on the percentage of Barnabas’s assets that were sold off, or that Barnabas had a ceremony upon giving the cash to the family.  None of that!  Which makes me look forward to tonight when my wife and I consider the story in Acts 5 – You know – when Ananias, together with his wife Sapphira try to duplicate the gift but die trying.

The differences will be instructive!


Follow Considering the Bible on WordPress.com

Let Me Tell You a Story – A Racing Prius

let-me-tell-you-a-story.jpg

I was out one fine Saturday with my youngest daughter, getting some chores done and enjoying being with my little girl.  As we were driving about, we came to a red light and pulled up beside a fella on a ten speed bike.

I looked over to Sarah and told her that my little Prius would easily beat this bike at the green, and we laughed a bit.  I told her that all I need for the little car is two bright blue racing stripes down the middle of the car – that way no one would challenge me at the gate!

We laughed and went on our way, little realizing what the future held for my famous little car.  By the way, have I told you that I own a Prius?  What a great little car.  I have always been a Toyota fella, but a few years back, I started researching the benefits of a Prius and found I wanted to try one.  Bought myself a 2012, and been very happy.  I use it for commuting primarily, but on the weekend, have found it to be a great little truck for hauling payloads of 500 lb or less.  Anyway, this isn’t intended to be a commercial for Toyota, but a story bout my little girls love for an old fool.

Months passed after our little excursion and race with the ten speed.  (By the way,  I did beat the bike off the line!)  I had forgotten about our little discussion, but my daughter hadn’t.  As I came out of church one Sunday, I saw three folks hanging around my little beast, and automatically thought of trouble.  Putting on my eye crutches, I realized it was my daughters along with one of their friends, applying stripes to my beast.  She hadn’t forgot our day out and my silly comment on the stripes.

prius - small.jpgYou know, as I drive the beast around town, I get some great reactions.  One fella, at a bus stop, walked to the edge of the curb and gave me a thumbs up.  I am known as the fella with the racing Prius at work.

Some folks make fun, and mock it.  Their problem not mine.  When I look at the car, I see my daughter’s love for me.

It all depends on the story!


Follow Considering the Bible on WordPress.com

Let Me Tell You a Story – Coincidence?

let-me-tell-you-a-story.jpg

One more story for those out there reading my thoughts.

It was a long time ago, well nigh 40 years now, when I met my future wife, and began to experience things that completely changed my life.

As you may know from previous blog posts, I had been haunted by the Great White Throne judgement since I was about 7, constantly looking for distractions in my life. When that pretty little girl entered my vision, I thought – Awesome distraction!

But a soon as we started chatting, she spoke of Jesus and how He had saved her from death in an auto accident. But she had something that was different and I wanted to know more.

Can I take you on a date? She said yes! (Obviously)

And so our love began. And so I traveled to her home 40 minutes north of my work, every night to be with her.

I was converted, saved from a life of waste and sin a mere week after I met her. On February 19th, 1981, I bent the knee to Christ. All my fears and worries evaporated. Coming out of a drug culture, we had an expression for a permanent smile.

A coat hanger.

Well I definitely had a coat hanger that night.

I was so excited about knowing the Savior, I couldn’t sit still. I immediately went to visit my girl, (I got right at her brothers house, but that is a different story!) but she just went to bed, so I took off to my apartment in Orillia.

French fries

As I entered my neighborhood, I suddenly felt famished, and decided to get me some grub. Off to the local restaurant, where I found an empty booth and ordered some fries.

Before the fries arrived, temptation sat down beside me.

She said she knew me, but it must have been from a previous night in a bar, when I had had just one drink too many. I couldn’t remember her name, or even her face. But she sure wanted to know me. Wink nod.

Golly – a brand new believer, without a whit of Bible knowledge, but surely this was wrong. No matter, since I was so high on Jesus, I started sharing what I knew of Jesus. She looked shocked and left to find some other victim. But this type of activity was not the last I would notice as a young believer.

As I hinted around earlier, my favorite and I got hitched eight months after meeting. Just prior to the wedding, we met a fella that showed an interest in the Lord and he eventually made a confession of faith the day before the wedding (if I recall correctly).

He went away so happy and I told him that we should get together again the next day – before I got hitched! But he didn’t show up. I eventually was able to chat with him and he told me a story that was very eerily reminiscent of my own.

The night he got right with God, he ran into an old friend who offered herself to him. He said he was shocked, since previously she had shown no interest in him other than as a friend.

I suppose it is clear as to why I didn’t see him the next day. Falling into a sinful act upon the very day of salvation must be heartbreaking, and I wanted to encourage him of the long haul. But alas, I don’t think I saw him after that.

My favorite and I got hitched, we moved south and started our lives together.

But I think of him occasionally and hope for the best.

Those experiences taught me that we have an intelligent enemy, and that his methods are “coincidental”.

Roaring Lion

Our defense?

  • Be sober-minded
  • Be watchful

1 Peter 5:8

Be sober-minded; be watchful. Your adversary the devil prowls around like a roaring lion, seeking someone to devour.

Drop me a comment if you have experienced a similar attack, and of how the Lord rescued you from the one who is our enemy.


Follow Considering the Bible on WordPress.com

Let Me Tell You a Story – Plowing

 

let-me-tell-you-a-story.jpgIts been a decade or two since I used to go trapping.  Trapping with an elder in a church in the north half of Quebec, Canada.

Let me tell you a wee story, bout a time I was trying to relate to a believer in a church.  He was a trapper in a small northern town in Quebec, where the snow fell deep and the temperature dropped deeper.  He was a big man, and his wife would buy loaves of bread to make him lunches everyday.  She would put all the sandwiches back into the sandwich bag for his lunch the next day!

Much of that info was unnecessary, but he was an interesting fella, and I felt I needed to connect with him.

Did I tell you he was a hobby trapper?  This hobby of his offered me an opportunity to connect with him.  So, I swallowed my fear of blood and eyeballs, and asked if I could help him the next time he goes out.

The day came and we headed north to a trap line, crossing a frozen lake covered with freshly fallen snow.  It was a glorious day, and it was obvious that I was a newby on the trip.  I would be chatting and asking questions, pointing over there and checking that thing out – O wow, hey did you see that over there?

beaver pelt
Beaver Pelts

But not Reynald.

He was focused on the beaver house that was ’bout a half mile out yet.  Oh, he was polite, and super friendly, but he was focused.  Did I tell you I was a bit of a scatterbrain?  If not, I’m telling you now.  And to think of it at the time, it wasn’t obvious.

Until…

Until we got to the beaver house, and I looked back.  Big ol’ Reynalds path through the fresh fallen snow was like a surveyors line.  Straight, linear, without curvature or bend.

Ol dummy over here, my path looked like an ol drunk had stumbled through the snow.

What was the difference between ol Reynald and myself?

A goal, a point of focus, a destination.  Yup – that was all it was.

ploughing with a muleI have never been a farm boy, needing to plow straight furrows.  So, this story is a Canadian’s way of relating to plowing a straight furrow in a field.  To plow a straight furrow, a goal or destination needs to be focused on.  Short sighted goals to the left or right will produce a crooked furrow.

Looking back during the plowing of a field is of course foolish.

Luke 9:62

Jesus said to him, “No one who puts his hand to the plow and looks back is fit for the kingdom of God.”

What is your focus?  Are you easily distracted?  How is your plowing going?

By the way, I ended up skinning some of the trapped animals, and found that my dread of blood and eyeballs could be controlled if I was trying to love a fellow believer.  But don’t ask me to touch your eyeball today – That is just too gross!!!

Oh, and by the way, if you are of the opinion that trapping is immoral, or constitutes a cruelty to animals, let it be known that I no longer trap.

But I still eat the occasional hamburger!


Follow Considering the Bible on WordPress.com

Patience – Mimics God’s Character

Patience – No one asks for it. To do so, brings catastrophe. At least in the here and now.Patience 2

Yet, as painful as trials are, exercising patience in the trials of our lives, produces plenty of fruit.

Hebrews 12:9-11

9 Besides this, we have had earthly fathers who disciplined us and we respected them. Shall we not much more be subject to the Father of spirits and live?

10 For they disciplined us for a short time as it seemed best to them, but he disciplines us for our good, that we may share his holiness.

11 For the moment all discipline seems painful rather than pleasant, but later it yields the peaceful fruit of righteousness to those who have been trained by it.

Patience 3

Patience Mimics God’s Character

Romans 2:4

4 Or do you presume on the riches of his kindness and forbearance and patience, not knowing that God’s kindness is meant to lead you to repentance?

How often I have considered that the best way to bring one into the kingdom is through threats of hell, punishment, and judgment.

No Carl that is so wrong!

We are called to exercise love, patience, goodness and forbearance (self-restraint/tolerance) to those who oppose us.  This is the Christian life and part of the cross we are to carry.

Romans 9:22

22 What if God, desiring to show his wrath and to make known his power, has endured with much patience vessels of wrath prepared for destruction,

This verse starts out with God willing to shew wrath, and ends with a display of God’s patience to those who  deserve the wrath.  What an amazing God we serve!

Galations 5:22
22 But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness,

Although we have the privilege to walk in the Spirit, we have to remember that this is not our fruit, but the fruit of the Spirit that is being displayed in our lives as we yield to the truth.

Patience 1


Follow Considering the Bible on WordPress.com

Thanks again for coming to visit. I hope you found something of interest in this post and would appreciate a comment, to begin a discussion.


End Notes
1  The following information is found in The Complete Word Study Dictionary, AMG Publishers. (emphasis mine)
G2347 – θλίψις – thlípsis; gen. thlípseōs, fem. noun from thlíbō (G2346), to crush, press, compress, squeeze, which is from thláō (n.f.), to break. Tribulation, trouble, affliction.
(I) In a figurative manner, pressure from evils, affliction, distress (2Co_2:4; Php_1:16); of a woman in travail (Joh_16:21). Often as a metonym for evils by which one is pressed, i.e., affliction, distress, calamity (Mat_13:21; Act_7:10-11; Rom_5:3; 2Co_1:4; Heb_10:33). In apposition in Mar_13:19. With the syn. stenochōría (G4730), literally narrowness of room, anguish, distress (Rom_2:9); with anágkē (G318), constraint, necessity (2Co_6:4; 1Th_3:7). See Sept.: 1Sa_10:19; Psa_119:143; Isa_8:22.
(II) Related to stenochōría (G4730), distress, narrowness, occurring only four times with the connotation of narrowness, from stenós (G4728), narrow of room, confined space. In three of the four occurrences in the NT, stenochōría is associated with thlípsis (Rom_2:9; Rom_8:35; 2Co_6:4). Thlípsis refers more to being crushed while stenōchoría refers more to narrowness of room or discomfort. Tribulation may affect either body or mind or both.
2  The following information is found in The Complete Word Study Dictionary, AMG Publishers. (emphasis mine)
Patience – G5281 ὑπομονή hupomone
to persevere, remain under. A bearing up under, patience, endurance as to things or circumstances
Hupomonḗ is associated with hope (1Th_1:3) and refers to that quality of character which does not allow one to surrender to circumstances or succumb under trial.
Generally meaning endurance, patience, perseverance or constancy under suffering in faith and duty.
Specifically patience as a quality of mind, the bearing of evils and suffering with tranquil mind.
Longsuffering – G3115 μακροθυμία makrothumía;
To be long-suffering. Forbearance, long-suffering, self-restraint before proceeding to action. The quality of a person who is able to avenge himself yet refrains from doing so
In Heb_6:15, makrothuméō (G3114) is used of Abraham’s patient faith in God under the pressure of trying circumstances (Jas_5:7-8).
Makrothumía is patience in respect to persons while hupomonḗ (G5281), endurance, is putting up with things or circumstances. Both words are often found together (2Co_6:4, 2Co_6:6; 2Ti_3:10).
Makrothumía is associated with mercy (éleos [G1656]) and is used of God.

Patience – Christian Service Demands it

Patience – No one asks for it. To do so, brings catastrophe. At least in the here and now.Patience 2

Yet, as painful as trials are, exercising patience in the trials of our lives, produces plenty of fruit.

Hebrews 12:9-11

9 Besides this, we have had earthly fathers who disciplined us and we respected them. Shall we not much more be subject to the Father of spirits and live?

10 For they disciplined us for a short time as it seemed best to them, but he disciplines us for our good, that we may share his holiness.

11 For the moment all discipline seems painful rather than pleasant, but later it yields the peaceful fruit of righteousness to those who have been trained by it.

Patience 3

Christian Service Demands Patience

2 Corinthians 6:4

4 but as servants of God we commend ourselves in every way: by great endurance, in afflictions, hardships, calamities,

How do men judge themselves as minister of God?  Sometimes, when a man states he is called to the ministry, he sometimes supports the claims with worldly criteria.

Flamboyant, articulate, verbose, charismatic, personable, handsome, grave, organized….

Paul states that his approval as a minister of God came through exercising much patience.

Patience takes time.

Character is different from personality.

1 Timothy 6:11

11 But as for you, O man of God, flee these things. Pursue righteousness, godliness, faith, love, steadfastness, gentleness

2 Timothy 3:10

10 You, however, have followed my teaching, my conduct, my aim in life, my faith, my patience, my love, my steadfastness,

Both of these verses describe the importance of patience in the minister’s life.

I sometimes consider the attributes described above (both prescriptive and descriptive) of the minister to be like a coat of fur on an animal.

A porcupine does not grow fur like a mink. The fur comes from within.  No matter how hard a porcupine tries, they can not grow fur like a mink!

The inner life is what produces a minister.  How is your inner life?

Patience 1


Follow Considering the Bible on WordPress.com

Thanks again for coming to visit. I hope you found something of interest in this post and would appreciate a comment, to begin a discussion.


End Notes
1  The following information is found in The Complete Word Study Dictionary, AMG Publishers. (emphasis mine)
G2347 – θλίψις – thlípsis; gen. thlípseōs, fem. noun from thlíbō (G2346), to crush, press, compress, squeeze, which is from thláō (n.f.), to break. Tribulation, trouble, affliction.
(I) In a figurative manner, pressure from evils, affliction, distress (2Co_2:4; Php_1:16); of a woman in travail (Joh_16:21). Often as a metonym for evils by which one is pressed, i.e., affliction, distress, calamity (Mat_13:21; Act_7:10-11; Rom_5:3; 2Co_1:4; Heb_10:33). In apposition in Mar_13:19. With the syn. stenochōría (G4730), literally narrowness of room, anguish, distress (Rom_2:9); with anágkē (G318), constraint, necessity (2Co_6:4; 1Th_3:7). See Sept.: 1Sa_10:19; Psa_119:143; Isa_8:22.
(II) Related to stenochōría (G4730), distress, narrowness, occurring only four times with the connotation of narrowness, from stenós (G4728), narrow of room, confined space. In three of the four occurrences in the NT, stenochōría is associated with thlípsis (Rom_2:9; Rom_8:35; 2Co_6:4). Thlípsis refers more to being crushed while stenōchoría refers more to narrowness of room or discomfort. Tribulation may affect either body or mind or both.
2  The following information is found in The Complete Word Study Dictionary, AMG Publishers. (emphasis mine)
Patience – G5281 ὑπομονή hupomone
to persevere, remain under. A bearing up under, patience, endurance as to things or circumstances
Hupomonḗ is associated with hope (1Th_1:3) and refers to that quality of character which does not allow one to surrender to circumstances or succumb under trial.
Generally meaning endurance, patience, perseverance or constancy under suffering in faith and duty.
Specifically patience as a quality of mind, the bearing of evils and suffering with tranquil mind.
Longsuffering – G3115 μακροθυμία makrothumía;
To be long-suffering. Forbearance, long-suffering, self-restraint before proceeding to action. The quality of a person who is able to avenge himself yet refrains from doing so
In Heb_6:15, makrothuméō (G3114) is used of Abraham’s patient faith in God under the pressure of trying circumstances (Jas_5:7-8).
Makrothumía is patience in respect to persons while hupomonḗ (G5281), endurance, is putting up with things or circumstances. Both words are often found together (2Co_6:4, 2Co_6:6; 2Ti_3:10).
Makrothumía is associated with mercy (éleos [G1656]) and is used of God.

Patience – Required to Inherit the Promises

Patience – No one asks for it. To do so, brings catastrophe. At least in the here and now.Patience 2

Yet, as painful as trials are, exercising patience in the trials of our lives, produces plenty of fruit.

Hebrews 12:9-11

9 Besides this, we have had earthly fathers who disciplined us and we respected them. Shall we not much more be subject to the Father of spirits and live?

10 For they disciplined us for a short time as it seemed best to them, but he disciplines us for our good, that we may share his holiness.

11 For the moment all discipline seems painful rather than pleasant, but later it yields the peaceful fruit of righteousness to those who have been trained by it.

Patience 3

Patience is Required to Inherit the Promises

Romans 2:5-8 (note verse 7)

5 But because of your hard and impenitent heart you are storing up wrath for yourself on the day of wrath when God’s righteous judgment will be revealed.

6 He will render to each one according to his works:

7 to those who by patience in well-doing seek for glory and honor and immortality, he will give eternal life;

8 but for those who are self-seeking and do not obey the truth, but obey unrighteousness, there will be wrath and fury.

Paul is speaking something hard here.

Verse 6 speaks of judgment according to deeds.  (A fairly consistent teaching in the Word It fairly surprised me coming from the evangelical background of my past.)

The hard thing is that Paul links immortality / eternal life somehow with patient continuance in good works.  How you work that out in your mind is up to you, but no matter how you do it, it is obvious that patience is necessary.

Hebrews 6:12, 15

12 so that you may not be sluggish, but imitators of those who through faith and patience inherit the promises. …

15 And thus Abraham, having patiently waited, obtained the promise.

Inheriting the promises and obtaining the promise.  For the sake of staying on focus concerning patience, I won’t venture into why “promises” in verse 12 morphs into a singular promise in verse 15.  It may be immaterial.  The point is, Abraham had a promise and it wasn’t realized until all his time was “wasted.”

Sometimes patience is hardest to exercise due to our lack of understanding God’s promise.  But Abraham eventually understood.  Through patience, he obtained the promise.

Hebrews 10:36

36 For you have need of endurance, so that when you have done the will of God you may receive what is promised.

Whoever wrote Hebrews was beating the same drum again.  Christians need to exercise patience.  We are on this earth to perform the will of God.  After that, the promise will be received.  Consider what Abraham had to do, between first hearing the promise and actually realizing the promise.  He was told to…

  • Leave his family behind.
  • Leave his country behind.
  • Leave his gods behind.
  • Leave his security behind.
  • Leave his reputation behind.

I think you get the point.  Abraham had to exercise incredible patience with the demands put upon him.  We often think of him as the father of our faith, and rightly so, but the patience he exercised while his promise of an heir seemed to vaporize was incredible.

Not perfect, but incredible.

We have to exercise patience as we see some of our hopes and dreams seemingly vaporize in our lives.  Patience isn’t patience if everything is going the way we want it to go!

Consider.

Patience 1


Follow Considering the Bible on WordPress.com

Thanks again for coming to visit. I hope you found something of interest in this post and would appreciate a comment, to begin a discussion.


End Notes
1  The following information is found in The Complete Word Study Dictionary, AMG Publishers. (emphasis mine)
G2347 – θλίψις – thlípsis; gen. thlípseōs, fem. noun from thlíbō (G2346), to crush, press, compress, squeeze, which is from thláō (n.f.), to break. Tribulation, trouble, affliction.
(I) In a figurative manner, pressure from evils, affliction, distress (2Co_2:4; Php_1:16); of a woman in travail (Joh_16:21). Often as a metonym for evils by which one is pressed, i.e., affliction, distress, calamity (Mat_13:21; Act_7:10-11; Rom_5:3; 2Co_1:4; Heb_10:33). In apposition in Mar_13:19. With the syn. stenochōría (G4730), literally narrowness of room, anguish, distress (Rom_2:9); with anágkē (G318), constraint, necessity (2Co_6:4; 1Th_3:7). See Sept.: 1Sa_10:19; Psa_119:143; Isa_8:22.
(II) Related to stenochōría (G4730), distress, narrowness, occurring only four times with the connotation of narrowness, from stenós (G4728), narrow of room, confined space. In three of the four occurrences in the NT, stenochōría is associated with thlípsis (Rom_2:9; Rom_8:35; 2Co_6:4). Thlípsis refers more to being crushed while stenōchoría refers more to narrowness of room or discomfort. Tribulation may affect either body or mind or both.
2  The following information is found in The Complete Word Study Dictionary, AMG Publishers. (emphasis mine)
Patience – G5281 ὑπομονή hupomone
to persevere, remain under. A bearing up under, patience, endurance as to things or circumstances
Hupomonḗ is associated with hope (1Th_1:3) and refers to that quality of character which does not allow one to surrender to circumstances or succumb under trial.
Generally meaning endurance, patience, perseverance or constancy under suffering in faith and duty.
Specifically patience as a quality of mind, the bearing of evils and suffering with tranquil mind.
Longsuffering – G3115 μακροθυμία makrothumía;
To be long-suffering. Forbearance, long-suffering, self-restraint before proceeding to action. The quality of a person who is able to avenge himself yet refrains from doing so
In Heb_6:15, makrothuméō (G3114) is used of Abraham’s patient faith in God under the pressure of trying circumstances (Jas_5:7-8).
Makrothumía is patience in respect to persons while hupomonḗ (G5281), endurance, is putting up with things or circumstances. Both words are often found together (2Co_6:4, 2Co_6:6; 2Ti_3:10).
Makrothumía is associated with mercy (éleos [G1656]) and is used of God.

Patience – A Goal in the Christian Life

Patience – No one asks for it. To do so, brings catastrophe. At least in the here and now.Patience 2

Yet, as painful as trials are, exercising patience in the trials of our lives, produces plenty of fruit.

Hebrews 12:9-11

9 Besides this, we have had earthly fathers who disciplined us and we respected them. Shall we not much more be subject to the Father of spirits and live?

10 For they disciplined us for a short time as it seemed best to them, but he disciplines us for our good, that we may share his holiness.

11 For the moment all discipline seems painful rather than pleasant, but later it yields the peaceful fruit of righteousness to those who have been trained by it.

Patience 3

Patience is a Goal in the Christian Life

Colossians 1:9-11

9 And so, from the day we heard, we have not ceased to pray for you, asking that you may be filled with the knowledge of his will in all spiritual wisdom and understanding,

10 so as to walk in a manner worthy of the Lord, fully pleasing to him: bearing fruit in every good work and increasing in the knowledge of God;

11 being strengthened with all power, according to his glorious might, for all endurance and patience with joy,

I have often considered this set of verses my favorite text in the Bible.  So much in the prayer of Paul for the Colossians, and it all ends with patience and longsuffering.

But isn’t patience the same thing as longsuffering?

There are many similarities between these two terms.

I really like the explanation given by the The Complete Word Study Dictionary, AMG Publishers.

Longsuffering (makrothumía) is patience in respect to persons while patience (hupomone) endurance, is putting up with things or circumstances. Both words are often found together (2Co_6:4, 2Co_6:6; 2Ti_3:10).

Paul doesn’t leave much room for a believer to be impatient.

Patience 1


Follow Considering the Bible on WordPress.com

Thanks again for coming to visit. I hope you found something of interest in this post and would appreciate a comment, to begin a discussion.


End Notes
1  The following information is found in The Complete Word Study Dictionary, AMG Publishers. (emphasis mine)
G2347 – θλίψις – thlípsis; gen. thlípseōs, fem. noun from thlíbō (G2346), to crush, press, compress, squeeze, which is from thláō (n.f.), to break. Tribulation, trouble, affliction.
(I) In a figurative manner, pressure from evils, affliction, distress (2Co_2:4; Php_1:16); of a woman in travail (Joh_16:21). Often as a metonym for evils by which one is pressed, i.e., affliction, distress, calamity (Mat_13:21; Act_7:10-11; Rom_5:3; 2Co_1:4; Heb_10:33). In apposition in Mar_13:19. With the syn. stenochōría (G4730), literally narrowness of room, anguish, distress (Rom_2:9); with anágkē (G318), constraint, necessity (2Co_6:4; 1Th_3:7). See Sept.: 1Sa_10:19; Psa_119:143; Isa_8:22.
(II) Related to stenochōría (G4730), distress, narrowness, occurring only four times with the connotation of narrowness, from stenós (G4728), narrow of room, confined space. In three of the four occurrences in the NT, stenochōría is associated with thlípsis (Rom_2:9; Rom_8:35; 2Co_6:4). Thlípsis refers more to being crushed while stenōchoría refers more to narrowness of room or discomfort. Tribulation may affect either body or mind or both.
2  The following information is found in The Complete Word Study Dictionary, AMG Publishers. (emphasis mine)
Patience – G5281 ὑπομονή hupomone
to persevere, remain under. A bearing up under, patience, endurance as to things or circumstances
Hupomonḗ is associated with hope (1Th_1:3) and refers to that quality of character which does not allow one to surrender to circumstances or succumb under trial.
Generally meaning endurance, patience, perseverance or constancy under suffering in faith and duty.
Specifically patience as a quality of mind, the bearing of evils and suffering with tranquil mind.
Longsuffering – G3115 μακροθυμία makrothumía;
To be long-suffering. Forbearance, long-suffering, self-restraint before proceeding to action. The quality of a person who is able to avenge himself yet refrains from doing so
In Heb_6:15, makrothuméō (G3114) is used of Abraham’s patient faith in God under the pressure of trying circumstances (Jas_5:7-8).
Makrothumía is patience in respect to persons while hupomonḗ (G5281), endurance, is putting up with things or circumstances. Both words are often found together (2Co_6:4, 2Co_6:6; 2Ti_3:10).
Makrothumía is associated with mercy (éleos [G1656]) and is used of God.

Patience – Brings Two Fruits

Patience – No one asks for it. To do so, brings catastrophe. At least in the here and now.

Patience 2

 

Hebrews 12:9-11

9 Besides this, we have had earthly fathers who disciplined us and we respected them. Shall we not much more be subject to the Father of spirits and live?

10 For they disciplined us for a short time as it seemed best to them, but he disciplines us for our good, that we may share his holiness.

11 For the moment all discipline seems painful rather than pleasant, but later it yields the peaceful fruit of righteousness to those who have been trained by it.

Patience Brings Two Fruits

Yet, as painful as trials are, exercising patience in the trials of our lives, produces mucho fruito.  The patience exercised during a time of discipline allows us to share in His love.

Nope – that is not what it says Carl – Read the Word!!!

The patience we exercise during painful trials gives two fruits.

Fruit one is sharing His holiness.  Whaaaa?  Share His holiness – that is a bit beyond me right now.  I’m gonna have to ponder on that for a spell.  Reckon I will need some porch time.

Fruit two is the peaceful fruit of righteousness.  This is awesome. So often when I think of righteousness, I think of conflict, striving to do right, fighting the good fight.

This fruit of righteousness is peaceful.  Consider the ramifications of that statement.  How different than my expectations of what the Word should say.

Patience 3

 


Follow Considering the Bible on WordPress.com

Thanks again for coming to visit. I hope you found something of interest in this post and would appreciate a comment, to begin a discussion.


End Notes
1 The following information is found in The Complete Word Study Dictionary, AMG Publishers. (emphasis mine)
G2347 – θλίψις – thlípsis; gen. thlípseōs, fem. noun from thlíbō (G2346), to crush, press, compress, squeeze, which is from thláō (n.f.), to break. Tribulation, trouble, affliction.
(I) In a figurative manner, pressure from evils, affliction, distress (2Co_2:4; Php_1:16); of a woman in travail (Joh_16:21). Often as a metonym for evils by which one is pressed, i.e., affliction, distress, calamity (Mat_13:21; Act_7:10-11; Rom_5:3; 2Co_1:4; Heb_10:33). In apposition in Mar_13:19. With the syn. stenochōría (G4730), literally narrowness of room, anguish, distress (Rom_2:9); with anágkē (G318), constraint, necessity (2Co_6:4; 1Th_3:7). See Sept.: 1Sa_10:19; Psa_119:143; Isa_8:22.
(II) Related to stenochōría (G4730), distress, narrowness, occurring only four times with the connotation of narrowness, from stenós (G4728), narrow of room, confined space. In three of the four occurrences in the NT, stenochōría is associated with thlípsis (Rom_2:9; Rom_8:35; 2Co_6:4). Thlípsis refers more to being crushed while stenōchoría refers more to narrowness of room or discomfort. Tribulation may affect either body or mind or both.
2 The following information is found in The Complete Word Study Dictionary, AMG Publishers. (emphasis mine)
Patience – G5281 ὑπομονή hupomone
to persevere, remain under. A bearing up under, patience, endurance as to things or circumstances
Hupomonḗ is associated with hope (1Th_1:3) and refers to that quality of character which does not allow one to surrender to circumstances or succumb under trial.
Generally meaning endurance, patience, perseverance or constancy under suffering in faith and duty.
Specifically patience as a quality of mind, the bearing of evils and suffering with tranquil mind.
Longsuffering – G3115 μακροθυμία makrothumía;
To be long-suffering. Forbearance, long-suffering, self-restraint before proceeding to action. The quality of a person who is able to avenge himself yet refrains from doing so
In Heb_6:15, makrothuméō (G3114) is used of Abraham’s patient faith in God under the pressure of trying circumstances (Jas_5:7-8).
Makrothumía is patience in respect to persons while hupomonḗ (G5281), endurance, is putting up with things or circumstances. Both words are often found together (2Co_6:4, 2Co_6:6; 2Ti_3:10).
Makrothumía is associated with mercy (éleos [G1656]) and is used of God.

Patience – Brings Experience

Patience – No one asks for it. To do so, brings catastrophe. At least in the here and now.Patience 2

 

 

Patience Brings Experience

Romans 5:3, 4

3 Not only that, but we rejoice in our sufferings, knowing that suffering produces endurance,

4 and endurance produces character, and character produces hope,

This is the famous text, that when mentioned in a study, invariably invokes a statement like – “Oh Carl – don’t ask for patience – all you are gonna get is problems!”

I suppose asking for tribulation is not prescribed here, but when tribulation (pressure) does come, it is not to be feared, although that seems to be my first reaction. If we understand that pressure works patience in us, and we have our long term goals correctly positioned in our lives, we can glory (boast, exult?) in our tribulations.

I need work in this!

I have seen that in the past 3 decades, as my wifey and I go through tough times, the experience we gain, by properly reacting (occasionally) gives us experience to fall back on in future trials. We have learned experientially that the Lord is merciful, kind, full of goodness and tender hearted to His people.

Have you experienced the kindness of the Lord lately?

Be patient.

Patience 1


Follow Considering the Bible on WordPress.com

Thanks again for coming to visit. I hope you found something of interest in this post and would appreciate a comment, to begin a discussion.


End Notes
1 The following information is found in The Complete Word Study Dictionary, AMG Publishers. (emphasis mine)
G2347 – θλίψις – thlípsis; gen. thlípseōs, fem. noun from thlíbō (G2346), to crush, press, compress, squeeze, which is from thláō (n.f.), to break. Tribulation, trouble, affliction.
(I) In a figurative manner, pressure from evils, affliction, distress (2Co_2:4; Php_1:16); of a woman in travail (Joh_16:21). Often as a metonym for evils by which one is pressed, i.e., affliction, distress, calamity (Mat_13:21; Act_7:10-11; Rom_5:3; 2Co_1:4; Heb_10:33). In apposition in Mar_13:19. With the syn. stenochōría (G4730), literally narrowness of room, anguish, distress (Rom_2:9); with anágkē (G318), constraint, necessity (2Co_6:4; 1Th_3:7). See Sept.: 1Sa_10:19; Psa_119:143; Isa_8:22.
(II) Related to stenochōría (G4730), distress, narrowness, occurring only four times with the connotation of narrowness, from stenós (G4728), narrow of room, confined space. In three of the four occurrences in the NT, stenochōría is associated with thlípsis (Rom_2:9; Rom_8:35; 2Co_6:4). Thlípsis refers more to being crushed while stenōchoría refers more to narrowness of room or discomfort. Tribulation may affect either body or mind or both.
2 The following information is found in The Complete Word Study Dictionary, AMG Publishers. (emphasis mine)
Patience – G5281 ὑπομονή hupomone
to persevere, remain under. A bearing up under, patience, endurance as to things or circumstances
Hupomonḗ is associated with hope (1Th_1:3) and refers to that quality of character which does not allow one to surrender to circumstances or succumb under trial.
Generally meaning endurance, patience, perseverance or constancy under suffering in faith and duty.
Specifically patience as a quality of mind, the bearing of evils and suffering with tranquil mind.
Longsuffering – G3115 μακροθυμία makrothumía;
To be long-suffering. Forbearance, long-suffering, self-restraint before proceeding to action. The quality of a person who is able to avenge himself yet refrains from doing so
In Heb_6:15, makrothuméō (G3114) is used of Abraham’s patient faith in God under the pressure of trying circumstances (Jas_5:7-8).
Makrothumía is patience in respect to persons while hupomonḗ (G5281), endurance, is putting up with things or circumstances. Both words are often found together (2Co_6:4, 2Co_6:6; 2Ti_3:10).
Makrothumía is associated with mercy (éleos [G1656]) and is used of God.