Redemption

Redemption – A Story – Part 4

The Bible speaks of redemption in many ways.

This short study looks at four greek words, revealing the redemption provided by the Lord Jesus Christ. A short story has been supplied, in order to help us picture the word studies of redemption.

The four greek words are

  • Agorazo
  • Exagorazo
  • Lytroo
  • Peripoiesis

Each of these words will be addressed in the following posts, along with a story of Amicus, a slave in the first century, with no hope of a future. We will follow Amicus through his experience of redemption and see in his life, the life we have experienced.



Amicus – Part 4

Amicus was stunned. Out of habit he started to follow the One who redeemed him, but this seemed to be unacceptable to the One who redeemed Him. Although at times, the One strode quickly ahead of Amicus, it seemed the One preferred to walk beside Amicus silently, offering occasional gentle questions. It seemed the One wanted to know Amicus, and to be known by Amicus.

Upon His first question, Amicus cowered. It was a natural reaction for Amicus, but this Master sought to dialogue with him. Why would anyone want to know what he thought? No one had ever asked of his thoughts before, let lone consider his thoughts. It took time to allow his thoughts to surface, somewhat surprised by the process of communicating simple ideas to the One.

Travelling the path to the One’s home took time, and the One was in no hurry. Occassionaly He would stop for a day or two, rest and and allow Amicus to absorb his new condition. A new condition that Amicus had much difficulty truly comprehending. Eventually the One and Amicus arrived at His outpost, and Amicus had never seen anything to be compared to. Servants everywhere, and Amicus fell into the role he was comfortable in.

Still, this new Master was completely different than Mahlah, or for that matter, any Master he had ever heard of. It seemed the One sought Amicus’ good, and not simply His own benefit. After all, this Master had unfathomable riches. His home was glorious and He had many in his service. Amicus knew his status, and with a thankful heart and a ready mind, He sought to serve his new Master in every way possible.

But this wasn’t acceptable to the One who redeemed him. Late one afternoon, the One came to Amicus during his serving, took him by the hand and led him into His own residence. Amicus, full of disbelief, thinking he may become a house servant, sought to know what service he might supply to the One.

“No service at this time Amicus, other than simply being with Me. You see, I have multitudes of servants. Servants I do not need. You are my family, and we will work together to accomplish things that my servants have no business with.”

Amicus couldn’t believe his ears. No – he wouldn’t believe his ears! This cannot be true. He ran from the One, back to the familiar, the common, the ordinary, the life of service. The One would occasionally cast his eyes toward Amicus, offering relationship instead of simply servitude, but Amicus fought against it. Too much at stake! How could he risk the bounty of servanthood he experienced at the Master’s outpost and assume to sonship? It is too much.

Years passed, and Amicus revelled in his new life. Service to the Master was beyond anything he had ever considered. Looking back, he had forgotten of Mahlah, and of the fears, hunger and loneliness he experienced. Only one thing nagged on Amicus, as he rested on his bed.

That offer. The eyes. The talks on the way from the auction block. The idea of being, not simply serving. Of creating and not simply building. Of thinking and not simply responding.

The day came when the One was walking through His garden, and Amicus swallowed his pride, walked over to the One who cared, and looked Him in the eye. Nothing changed, but everything changed.

Amicus began to possess, instead of simply serving. To partake instead of simply taking. To share instead of simply giving.

Peripoisis

1 Thessalonians 5:9

For God has not destined us for wrath, but to obtain salvation through our Lord Jesus Christ,

2 Thessalonians 2:14

To this he called you through our gospel, so that you may obtain the glory of our Lord Jesus Christ.

Hebrews 10:39

But we are not of those who shrink back and are destroyed, but of those who have faith and preserve their souls.

Like Amicus, we struggle with the offer of sonship. The implications are amazing. This last word we will consider before the end of this series is translated as obtain or preserve in the verses above. Note, it is important to see that the one who possesses the salvation and glory is the believer.

Believers possess/obtain salvation through our Lord Jesus Christ. Believers possess/obtain the glory of our Lord Jesus Christ. And the final verse to consider…

Hebrews 10:29 may be read

But we are not of those who shrink back and are destroyed, but of those who have faith and keep their souls (RSV)

Believers possess thier souls.

This is a concept that is beyond me. I freely admit it. To possess when redeemed by another?

How does that compute? The One is full of grace and truth. Look Him in the eye. It may be the scariest thing you ever do.


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Redemption

Redemption – A Story – Part 3

The Bible speaks of redemption in many ways.

This short study looks at four greek words, revealing the redemption provided by the Lord Jesus Christ. A short story has been supplied, in order to help us picture the word studies of redemption.

The four greek words are

  • Agorazo
  • Exagorazo
  • Lytroo
  • Peripoiesis

Each of these words will be addressed in the following posts, along with a story of Amicus, a slave in the first century, with no hope of a future. We will follow Amicus through his experience of redemption and see in his life, the life we have experienced.


Amicus – Part 3

As Amicus was being led off and out of the market place, he sensed a difference. No eyes of greed or deciet, no leering of possession or evil intents. He was led to a place out of the agora, into a field of open pasture. One who had purchased him and led him out of the agora, bent down to his ear and gently whispered – “You are free”

Lytroo

Matthew 20:28

even as the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many.”


Mark 10:45

For even the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many.”

Lytroo is the term that kicks my butt. (Am I allowed to say that in a Bible study?) As Amicus heard, the payment for his body and life was supplied, but without any strings attached. One who had purchased him had supplied him freedom.

This concept, for some believers, is threatening. Believers have an obligation to serve the Master after such a sacrifice.

I heartily agree, and yet this service is one of willing love to the One who paid it all. The requirement is one of the heart not of the contract, and the Master knows that only by giving the freedom to choose whom the former slave will serve, does He recieve the loving obedience He died for. He is truly One of grace. But He is also One of truth. He speaks of the dangers of complete freedom many times in His Word, warning that freedom can become it’s own slave master.

As Bob Dylan once sang – Ya gotta serve somebody. Service is non-negotiable – It is a fact of life. Who we gonna serve.

Well that is up to you.



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Redemption

Redemption – A Story – Part 2

The Bible speaks of redemption in many ways.

This short study looks at four greek words, revealing the redemption provided by the Lord Jesus Christ. A short story has been supplied, in order to help us picture the word studies of redemption.

The four greek words are

  • Agorazo
  • Exagorazo
  • Lytroo
  • Peripoiesis

Each of these words will be addressed in the following posts, along with a story of Amicus, a slave in the first century, with no hope of a future. We will follow Amicus through his experience of redemption and see in his life, the life we have experienced.



Amicus – Part 2

Amicus resigned himself to the uncertainty, realizing that the little he had experienced under Mahlah was now in his past. As they crested the last hill prior to the entrance into the city, Amicus realized his agrarian life would now seem simple compared to the confusion and conflict of the city.

Mahlah handed Amicus off to the slave barter, and stood back, thinking of the ca-ching soon to be his. Amicus, on the other hand feared the worst.

The auction started and Amicus was near the last of the slaves to be sold off that day. Under the searing heat, Amicus watched how the other slaves had been sold off, and hauled off by thier new owners. Somehow, it was worse than he had feared. Maybe Mahlah had been a kind master after all.

Eventually, it was Amicus’s time to be auctioned off. Standing on the wooden box, with eyes of greed learing at him, he listened to the barker call off his worth. 400 denarii? 450 denarii? Finaly Amicus heard of his worth. 850 denarii. Much much more than he was worth Much more than any other of the other slaves. Who paid such a high valus for such a lowly slave?

One came up to Amicus, led him off the box, paid for his body and took him out of the market place.

One had exagorazo‘d Amicus.

Exagorazo

Paul again uses the term agorazo, but modifies it. We all recognize the “ex” attached to the front of our word. We see it on numerous english words like extinguish (put the fire out), or execute (take the life away). Most obvious is the term “exit”, simply meaning a way out. To exagorazo is to take out of the market place, to no longer reside in the market place.

Galatians 3:13
Christ redeemed us from the curse of the law by becoming a curse for us–for it is written, “Cursed is everyone who is hanged on a tree”–

Christ’s work on the cross bought us, redeemed us, taking us out of the market place where the curse of the law ruled. We are free from the curse of the law

Galatians 4:5
to redeem those who were under the law, so that we might receive adoption as sons.

Again Paul speaks of those redeemed as being removed from being under the law, for the purpose of a greater blessing. But I am getting ahead of myself

Ephesians 5:16
making the best use of the time, because the days are evil.

Colossians 4:5
Walk in wisdom toward outsiders, making the best use of the time.

Making the best use of the time, to exagorazo time. Consider this concept. Why would Paul modify the term in relation to time?



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Redemption

Redemption – A Story – Part 1

The Bible speaks of redemption in many ways.

This short study looks at four greek words, revealing the redemption provided by the Lord Jesus Christ. A short story has been supplied, in order to help us picture the word studies of redemption.

The four greek words are

  • Agorazo
  • Exagorazo
  • Lytroo
  • Peripoiesis

Each of these words will be addressed in the following posts, along with a story of Amicus, a slave in the first century, with no hope of a future. We will follow Amicus through his experience of redemption and see in his life, the life we have experienced.


Amicus – Part 1

Amicus was a frail young man, born in a world of pain and suffering, under the brutal Roman Empire. He came into the world as his mother left it, never knowing her tender love. His father, Dalek struggled to care for the child, but eventually lost him to a Syrian trader by the time he was six.

The next twelve years, slavery and poverty became Amicus only reality, serving his master and spending long days of toil for no reward. A slaves life of obedience to his master meant a complete loss of his own will, living only to perform the dictates of another. His master, Mahlah, sought to dominate everything in his world. He was an evil man, full of deciet and threatenings.

Amicus spent every waking moment in subjection to Mahlah, knowing that a small meal and a corner in the back room waited for him every night. Continual servitude wore on Amicus, sapping all hope from his life. All expectations, other than another day and night of struggle, were slowly erased from his heart. Amicus resigned himself to a life of service, in service to Mahlah.

As Amicus became a young man, it was obvious to Mahlah of a financial opportunity. Amicus had become a strapping young man, complacent to his master and a prime purchase for a Roman senator. Mahlah sent out word that Amicus may be for sale and he realized multiple interests in his servant. This opportunity can not be wasted!

Mahlah woke Amicus up early one morning, instructed him to wash, supplied him oil and gave him a new tunic and pant. By the time the sun was breaking the horizon, Mahlah and Amicus were off to the city agora, the market place where everything from fruit to flesh was sold. This was going to be Amicus’s last day under the ownership of Mahlah. And it brought about a terror in Amicus’s heart he hadn’t experienced before.

Amicus realized he was going on the auction block. He was going to the agoraza, the market place. The one certainty that Amicus held onto, that of a small meal and rough bed, was lost to him

Agorazo

1 Corinthians 6:20

for you were bought with a price. So glorify God in your body.


1 Corinthians 7:23

You were bought with a price; do not become bondservants of men.

The apostle Paul uses the generic term agorazo to describe the condition the Corinthians were in at thier salvation. They were in the marketplace, on the auction block and were purchased. Paul emphasizes the action of purchase, the purchase of the sinner in both of these verse, and the resultant actions that were to be the proper response.




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Redemption

Redemption – A Story – Introduction

The Bible speaks of redemption in many ways.

It must be over three decades since I tripped, in the providence of God, over the multiple concepts God directed His apostles to describe the accomplishment of the Lord in His work on the cross. This reminder of redemtion was a blessing to my heart.

This short study, I hope, will open up our understanding of how the apostles saw our condition in our lost state, and the many facets of deliverance we have been given.

But first, we must refer to the source information, since my telling you of my thoughts without a basis in the Word, is only a fallen man’s wanderings down his dusty imagination. Hopefully, my friend, you will consider that to be of little use.

The following table supplies the greek words the apostles used to describe the Lord’s accomplishments. As you can see under the transliteration column, four basic words are used by the apostles, and we will consider each

The four basic words are

  • Agorazo
  • Exagorazo
  • Lytroo
  • Peripoiesis

Each of these words will be addressed in the following posts, along with a story of Amicus, a slave in the first century, with no hope of a future. We will follow Amicus through his experience of redemption and see in his life, the life we have experienced.

I hope you can join me in this study, and maybe, just maybe see the goodness of God.


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