Faith – Oligopistos – Matthew 6

Faith 2

As mentioned in my earlier post, I was in discussion with my Sunday School teacher and we verred into the topic of faith.  This topic addresses the first Greek word in our table below

Faith

He had told me there are a number of Greek words in the New Testament that are translated “faith” in our English Bible, and I let him know I thought otherwise.

So I came home and did a quick study, using Blue Letter Bible web site.  The following table gives a summary of the New Testament Greek words used when describing our English word “faith”.

Strongs #GreekTransliteratedEnglish Equivalent
New Testament (Greek) for “faith”
G571ἄπιστοςapistosthat believe not, unbelieving, faithless, unbeliever, infidel, thing incredible, which believe not
G1680ἐλπίςelpishope, faith
G3640ὀλιγόπιστοςoligopistosof little faith
G4102πίστιςpistisfaith, assurance, believe, belief, them that believe, fidelity
G4103πιστόςpistosfaithful, believe, believing, true, faithfully, believer, sure not tr
G6066ὀλιγοπιστίαoligopistialittleness of faith
 
little faith
 

Strong’s Number G3640 matches the Greek ὀλιγόπιστος (oligopistos), which occurs 5 times in 5 verses in the Greek concordance.

We will look at the first of four instances that Jesus (and only Jesus) used this Greek word in the following post. (Matthew 6:30 is parallel passage in Luke 12:28)

Matthew 6:25-30

“Therefore I tell you, do not be anxious about your life, what you will eat or what you will drink, nor about your body, what you will put on. Is not life more than food, and the body more than clothing?
 

Look at the birds of the air: they neither sow nor reap nor gather into barns, and yet your heavenly Father feeds them. Are you not of more value than they?

 

And which of you by being anxious can add a single hour to his span of life?

And why are you anxious about clothing?

 
Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow: they neither toil nor spin,
 

yet I tell you, even Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these.

But if God so clothes the grass of the field, which today is alive and tomorrow is thrown into the oven, will he not much more clothe you, O you of little faith?

GrubWorry over Grub and Garb

Worry worry worry.

Garb

A concern over food and clothing just doesn’t connect with me, residing in the USA and having much more than I need.  The disciples didn’t have it so good.  They had food for the day, thier daily bread. They may have had one set of apparel, and when it became worn, purchasing new wear would constitute a significant burden on thier resources. An inner garment and an outer garment, a belt and some sandals.  Food and clothing was a justified concern.

Does Jesus simply say not to worry.  No – He elevates our standing before God via  directing our attention to a bird and a little flower.  Amazing.  Let’s consider the lily.

The Lily

Madonna_lilyWe find Jesus talking to His disciples, speaking of the toil (growing exhausted) and spinning of a simple lily compared with the splendor of Solomon, (Israels wealthiest King).

This alone is instructive for us as believers, since we surely estimate King Solomon’s splendor (clothing/appearance) to be greater than that of a humble lily.  But the Master states that thinking to be wrong thinking.

Solomon spent his days toiling to create a splendor he enjoyed.  The lily does not toil, and is simply a splendor. (By the way, in the Lord’s estimation the greater splendor.)

Solomon had splendor that was external.  The lily’s splendor comes from within.

As believers, Jesus tells us the Father will “much more clothe” us.  He has greater concern for us than the lily, yet the lily had great splendor.  He compares the lily of the field (which has a temporary existence) with believers (non-temporary existence) who have so little faith.

Is Jesus simply speaking of the literal clothing on our back?  The Word states He supply’s our every need, so the clothing on my back is provided by the Father.

He is addressing the topic of worry.  Worry over the clothes on our back and the food we eat.  He reminds us numerous times that we are of much more worth than a sparrow or a lily.

MickeyMy greatest downfall in my walk with the Father is worry.  A mind numbing, paralyzing worry.  I have so little faith.

My worry comes from one source.  I have my eyes fixed on the wrong object.  Solomon’s splendor was visual, pride elevating, of this world.  The lily simply exhibited the life God supplied.  The lily didn’t toil for something beyond its reach, or seek to add to its current splendor, or even compare its splendor with a dandelion.

This is against my nature! I continually set goals to gauge my progress, compare myself with others and seek more out of life instead of simply enjoying the life supplied by the Father.

Abstract Watercolor TextureMy perspective is completely upside down.  Oh – I can justify my worry, calling it careful planning, walking in wisdom, careful stewardship.  How shallow and of no impact.

How accurate when Jesus called me out, that one with little faith.  Father forgive me and teach me to keep my eyes on you.

Please leave a comment and come visit next time to continue our look at faith.


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Faith – Elpis – Hope

Faith 2As mentioned in my earlier post, I was in discussion with my Sunday School teacher and we verred into the topic of faith.  This topic addresses the first Greek word in our table below

Faith

He had told me there are a number of Greek words in the New Testament that are translated “faith” in our English Bible, and I let him know I thought otherwise.

So I came home and did a quick study, using Blue Letter Bible web site.  The following table gives a summary of the New Testament Greek words used when describing our English word “faith”.

Strongs # Greek Transliterated English Equivalent
New Testament (Greek) for “faith”
G571 ἄπιστος apistos that believe not, unbelieving, faithless, unbeliever, infidel, thing incredible, which believe not
G1680 ἐλπίς elpis hope, faith
G3640 ὀλιγόπιστος oligopistos of little faith
G4102 πίστις pistis faith, assurance, believe, belief, them that believe, fidelity
G4103 πιστός pistos faithful, believe, believing, true, faithfully, believer, sure not tr
G6066 ὀλιγοπιστία oligopistia littleness of faith

This post will consider the term Elpis, ἐλπίς

Strong’s Definitions
ἐλπίς elpís, el-pece’; from a primary ἔλπω élpō (to anticipate, usually with pleasure); expectation (abstractly or concretely) or confidence:—faith, hope.

Romans 5

One of the most hope laden passages in the New Testament is found in Romans 5.  Based upon the believer finding peace with God, hope is born.  Not some nebulous hope that someday things will turn out.  No – Paul gets specific.  This hope refers to the glory of God.

The first time (verse 2) hope is referred to, I believe is the hope that is received upon your initial salvation experience.  That hope which the believer experiences, which the Lord supplies, immediately upon finding peace with God through the Lord Jesus.  That hope is the eager expectation of seeing God glorified in our lives, to bring Him honor and love, and in the midst of that hope, rejoicing in the middle of it!

Now the second time hope is referred to in this passage (verse 4) is the hope that becomes our hope – that is, the hope that each believer acquires through experience.  My hope, like all believers, is in the Lord Jesus and His resurrection from the dead.

HopeBut my hope, unlike any other believer, is a result of the working of the Lord Jesus personally in my life, bringing endurance and character into my life. My experience with the Master is unlike any other believer, and this is the beauty of the body of Christ.  But that is a topic for later.

We must remember that the goal of the Christian life is to become like the One who died for us.  And that requires suffering.  And I don’t like that at all.  But on a personal note, every time my wife and I have went through a period of suffering, the Lord has been faithful, supporting us through it, helping us to hang on, and providing relief when He considers it best. (Usually much later than I would consider it best – But He knows best!)

Let’s read the passage in review

Romans 5:1-5

Therefore, since we have been justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ.

Through him we have also obtained access by faith into this grace in which we stand, and we rejoice in hope of the glory of God.

Not only that, but we rejoice in our sufferings, knowing that suffering produces endurance,

and endurance produces character, and character produces hope,

and hope does not put us to shame, because God’s love has been poured into our hearts through the Holy Spirit who has been given to us.

all-i-have-left-is-hope

Can we think about hope just a bit more?  Hope in the English language is sometimes used to refer to as a last resort.  Something like you might say when a person is in the hospital, ” We can only hope now.”

I’m not convinced that is the connotation in the Scripture.  This hope is a confident hope, a hope that is a “first” response, not a last resort. I believe the glory of God is not something that may happen, but that we look forward to since He has already won the victory.  The hope of the glory of God is not somewhat possible.  The glory of God is inevitable.  If you are a believer, rejoice in that.

Romans 8

Romans 8:24

For in this hope we were saved. Now hope that is seen is not hope. For who hopes for what he sees?

Isn’t it obvious that hope carries with it an expectation, a confidence, an anticipation of some pleasurable experience.  No one in thier right mind hopes for a tragedy.  Hope is always associated with positive life experiences.

Note that hope is associated with the future. Nothing in the present, physical existence can be regulated to the concept of hope.  It is upon our faith in the risen Messiah that we can have confident hope that great things will occur.

1 Corinthians 13:13

1 Corinthians 13:13

So now faith, hope, and love abide, these three; but the greatest of these is love.

FaithHopeWhat is the difference between faith and hope in this verse?  If I understand it, faith is associated with a person, with the Person of Jesus Christ in the Scriptures.  Hope is built on that faith, but it is associated with future happenings and experiences.

Faith is a present tense thought – Hope is always in the future.  The two concepts are two sides of a single coin.  (Somewhat like faith and repentance)

Faith in the person of Jesus, and the gracious message He brought through His life and death,  gives us an earnest expectation of good and holy things in the future.

2 Corinthians 3:12

2 Corinthians 3:12

Since we have such a hope, we are very bold,

boldnessBoldness is the direct result of hope, of a specific hope that we can find in the resurrection of the Messiah.  Wonder if Paul is going to refer the the resurrection in this passage??

Philippians 1:20

Philippians 1:20

as it is my eager expectation and hope that I will not be at all ashamed, but that with full courage now as always Christ will be honored in my body, whether by life or by death.

I spoke earlier of hope having expectation associated with it and Paul is reiterating the same thought here.  Occasionally, I will express the same thought differently to get a point across. Paul is doing the same here.  Or he may be trying to emphasize the thought of expectation.  Yes – since again hope is connected directly with the resurrection of the Lord Jesus in the next verse

Acts 23:6

Acts 23:6

Now when Paul perceived that one part were Sadducees and the other Pharisees, he cried out in the council, “Brothers, I am a Pharisee, a son of Pharisees. It is with respect to the hope and the resurrection of the dead that I am on trial.”

hope 2Paul – you must stop connecting hope with the resurrection.  It seems to be a habit of yours!
Saint – where is your hope?  A better job?  To become rich?  For things to go my way.   I understand, since I also have these temporal hopes.
As believer’s let us remember our greater hope.  Dwell on the hope we have in His life, for just a few moments.  A hope that is higher, nobler and ultimately secure.  His resurrected life supplies us hope for the future.
Rejoice.
Thanks for visiting.  I look forward to your comments and questions.

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Faith – Apistos – Unbeliever

Faith 2As mentioned in my earlier post, I was in discussion with my Sunday School teacher and we verred into the topic of faith.  This topic addresses the first Greek word in our table below

Faith

He had told me there are a number of Greek words in the New Testament that are translated “faith” in our English Bible, and I let him know I thought otherwise.

So I came home and did a quick study, using Blue Letter Bible web site.  The following table gives a summary of the New Testament Greek words used when describing our English word “faith”.

Strongs # Greek Transliterated English Equivalent
New Testament (Greek) for “faith”
G571 ἄπιστος apistos that believe not, unbelieving, faithless, unbeliever, infidel, thing incredible, which believe not
G1680 ἐλπίς elpis hope, faith
G3640 ὀλιγόπιστος oligopistos of little faith
G4102 πίστις pistis faith, assurance, believe, belief, them that believe, fidelity
G4103 πιστός pistos faithful, believe, believing, true, faithfully, believer, sure not tr
G6066 ὀλιγοπιστία oligopistia littleness of faith

This post will consider Apistos, ἄπιστοςNo Faith

Strong’s Definitions
ἄπιστος ápistos, ap’-is-tos; from G1 (as a negative particle) and G4103; (actively) disbelieving, i.e. without Christian faith (specially, a heathen); (passively) untrustworthy (person), or incredible (thing):—that believeth not, faithless, incredible thing, infidel, unbeliever(-ing).

Apistos

This is the root word discussed earlier, with the prefix of “a” attached.  Having this prefix, negates the word, or in other words, creates the opposite of the term.
Consider a man who calls himself a theist – one who believes in God.  Place an “a” in front of this term and you find Richard Dawkins. (an athiest).
Unbeliever/Infidel

1 Timothy 5:8

But if anyone does not provide for his relatives, and especially for members of his household, he has denied the faith and is worse than an unbeliever.

infidelI used to read the KJV religiously, and in that translation, the term “unbeliever” was translated “infidel”.  This always bothered me since it is such a loaded term.
This verse actually convinced me of the need to provide life insurance for my wife, since it was so closely associated with the description of widows in this passage.
Again, this verse will be dealt with in a Conditional Security post I will provide, so I will leave the reader to that.
In conclusion of these past few posts, it seems obvious (at least to me) that the condition of unbelieving is not irreversible.   If you are in a state of unbelief, change your mind. 
Change your will.
Make a decision to follow the Master.  Consider the gospel of the grace of God and don’t throw away the invitation to enter into belief. 

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Faith – Apistos – Unbelievable

Faith 2As mentioned in my earlier post, I was in discussion with my Sunday School teacher and we verred into the topic of faith.  This topic addresses the first Greek word in our table below

Faith

He had told me there are a number of Greek words in the New Testament that are translated “faith” in our English Bible, and I let him know I thought otherwise.

So I came home and did a quick study, using Blue Letter Bible web site.  The following table gives a summary of the New Testament Greek words used when describing our English word “faith”.

Strongs # Greek Transliterated English Equivalent
New Testament (Greek) for “faith”
G571 ἄπιστος apistos that believe not, unbelieving, faithless, unbeliever, infidel, thing incredible, which believe not
G1680 ἐλπίς elpis hope, faith
G3640 ὀλιγόπιστος oligopistos of little faith
G4102 πίστις pistis faith, assurance, believe, belief, them that believe, fidelity
G4103 πιστός pistos faithful, believe, believing, true, faithfully, believer, sure not tr
G6066 ὀλιγοπιστία oligopistia littleness of faith

This post will consider Apistos, ἄπιστοςNo Faith

Strong’s Definitions
ἄπιστος ápistos, ap’-is-tos; from G1 (as a negative particle) and G4103; (actively) disbelieving, i.e. without Christian faith (specially, a heathen); (passively) untrustworthy (person), or incredible (thing):—that believeth not, faithless, incredible thing, infidel, unbeliever(-ing).

Apistos

This is the root word discussed earlier, with the prefix of “a” attached.  Having this prefix, negates the word, or in other words, creates the opposite of the term.
Consider a man who calls himself a theist – one who believes in God.  Place an “a” in front of this term and you find Richard Dawkins. (an athiest).
Unbelievable/Incredible

Acts 26:8

Why is it thought incredible by any of you that God raises the dead?

unbelievableThis verse states that it takes faith to limit God.  What?
Let me rephrase this verse in a Carlism.
Why is your faith limited to God only working to the point of raising the dead, but not including the raising the the dead?
Is that limiting attitude considered faith?  Why do we limit God the Father?
He has given ample evidence to know the truth.
The gospel is not unbelievable – it is wholly within the realm of believability, based on historical evidence, the Biblical text, the growth of the early church and the death of the apostles, to name a few.
But as I think of it, in a sense, the gospel is unbelievable, that is, in the motive of the Father in sacrificing His Son for a sinner like me.  His love is beyond comprehension!  The Son’s love for me, in dying that cruel death, is beyond my understanding.  Oh the deep love of Jesus.
He has supplied the truth to us.  Do not let the unbelievable love of God escape your grasp.
Be right with God. 
Do not limit Him!

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Faith – Apistos – Disbelieve

Faith 2

As mentioned in my earlier post, I was in discussion with my Sunday School teacher and we verred into the topic of faith. This topic addresses the first Greek word in our table below

Faith

He had told me there are a number of Greek words in the New Testament that are translated “faith” in our English Bible, and I let him know I thought otherwise.

So I came home and did a quick study, using Blue Letter Bible web site. The following table gives a summary of the New Testament Greek words used when describing our English word “faith”.

Strongs # Greek Transliterated English Equivalent
New Testament (Greek) for “faith”
G571 ἄπιστος apistos that believe not, unbelieving, faithless, unbeliever, infidel, thing incredible, which believe not
G1680 ἐλπίς elpis hope, faith
G3640 ὀλιγόπιστος oligopistos of little faith
G4102 πίστις pistis faith, assurance, believe, belief, them that believe, fidelity
G4103 πιστός pistos faithful, believe, believing, true, faithfully, believer, sure not tr
G6066 ὀλιγοπιστία oligopistia littleness of faith

This post will consider Apistos, ἄπιστος

No Faith

Strong’s Definitions
ἄπιστος ápistos, ap’-is-tos; from G1 (as a negative particle) and G4103; (actively) disbelieving, i.e. without Christian faith (specially, a heathen); (passively) untrustworthy (person), or incredible (thing):—that believeth not, faithless, incredible thing, infidel, unbeliever(-ing).

Apistos

This is the root word discussed earlier, with the prefix of “a” attached. Having this prefix, negates the word, or in other words, creates the opposite of the term.

Consider a man who calls himself a theist – one who believes in God. Place an “a” in front of this term and you find Richard Dawkins. (an athiest).

Disbelieve

John 20:27

Then he said to Thomas, “Put your finger here, and see my hands; and put out your hand, and place it in my side. Do not disbelieve, but believe.”

disbelieve

Jesus gave Thomas an opportunity to believe. It is an act of the will, and Thomas had the opportunity to exercise his will, upon the evidence Jesus supplied him, to believe that Jesus rose from the dead.

In other words, to believe the gospel.
God is not reluctant to supply evidence. He is active if we have eyes to see, and ears to hear.
This is your decision.

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Faith – Apistos – Unfaithful

Faith 2As mentioned in my earlier post, I was in discussion with my Sunday School teacher and we verred into the topic of faith.  This topic addresses the first Greek word in our table below

Faith

He had told me there are a number of Greek words in the New Testament that are translated “faith” in our English Bible, and I let him know I thought otherwise.

So I came home and did a quick study, using Blue Letter Bible web site.  The following table gives a summary of the New Testament Greek words used when describing our English word “faith”.

Strongs # Greek Transliterated English Equivalent
New Testament (Greek) for “faith”
G571 ἄπιστος apistos that believe not, unbelieving, faithless, unbeliever, infidel, thing incredible, which believe not
G1680 ἐλπίς elpis hope, faith
G3640 ὀλιγόπιστος oligopistos of little faith
G4102 πίστις pistis faith, assurance, believe, belief, them that believe, fidelity
G4103 πιστός pistos faithful, believe, believing, true, faithfully, believer, sure not tr
G6066 ὀλιγοπιστία oligopistia littleness of faith

This post will consider Apistos, ἄπιστοςNo Faith

Strong’s Definitions
ἄπιστος ápistos, ap’-is-tos; from G1 (as a negative particle) and G4103; (actively) disbelieving, i.e. without Christian faith (specially, a heathen); (passively) untrustworthy (person), or incredible (thing):—that believeth not, faithless, incredible thing, infidel, unbeliever(-ing).

Apistos

This is the root word discussed earlier, with the prefix of “a” attached.  Having this prefix, negates the word, or in other words, creates the opposite of the term.
Consider a man who calls himself a theist – one who believes in God.  Place an “a” in front of this term and you find Richard Dawkins. (an athiest).
Unfaithful

Luke 12:46unfaithful

The master of that servant will come on a day when he does not expect him and at an hour he does not know, and will cut him in pieces and put him with the unfaithful.

This verse really needs to be dealt with in my Conditional Security posts, and I am sure it will come up soon.  The issue is that the servant will be cut up in pieces and placed with the unfaithful.
Does this imply he was not in that category earlier?
Look for that discussion in a related post.  For now, the passage speaks of unfaithfulness related to supplied instructions.  The servant knew the instructions, but decided to do his own will.
Not a good situation – The servant gained the distinction of becoming unfaithful.
Do not be unfaithful – Life hangs in the balance!

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Faith – Apistos – Faithless

Faith 2As mentioned in my introduction to faith post, I was in Sunday School class a while back and had the opportunity to discuss Christian maturity with the teacher, and as you may have guessed, we wandered off into the subject of faith.

Faith

He had told me there are a number of Greek words in the New Testament that are translated “faith” in our English Bible, and I let him know I thought otherwise.

So I came home and did a quick study, using Blue Letter Bible web site.  The following table gives a summary of the New Testament Greek words used when describing our English word “faith”.

Strongs # Greek Transliterated English Equivalent
New Testament (Greek) for “faith”
G571 ἄπιστος apistos that believe not, unbelieving, faithless, unbeliever, infidel, thing incredible, which believe not
G1680 ἐλπίς elpis hope, faith
G3640 ὀλιγόπιστος oligopistos of little faith
G4102 πίστις pistis faith, assurance, believe, belief, them that believe, fidelity
G4103 πιστός pistos faithful, believe, believing, true, faithfully, believer, sure not tr
G6066 ὀλιγοπιστία oligopistia littleness of faith

This post will consider Apistos, ἄπιστοςNo Faith

Strong’s Definitions
ἄπιστος ápistos, ap’-is-tos; from G1 (as a negative particle) and G4103; (actively) disbelieving, i.e. without Christian faith (specially, a heathen); (passively) untrustworthy (person), or incredible (thing):—that believeth not, faithless, incredible thing, infidel, unbeliever(-ing).

Apistos

This is the root word discussed earlier, with the prefix of “a” attached.  Having this prefix, negates the word, or in other words, creates the opposite of the term.
Consider a man who calls himself a theist – one who believes in God.  Place an “a” in front of this term and you find Richard Dawkins. (an athiest).

Faithless

The first time I find this word is in Matthew 17Faithless

Mat 17:17

And Jesus answered, “O faithless and twisted generation, how long am I to be with you? How long am I to bear with you? Bring him here to me.”

Often this term is used of the religious men and women living when the Messiah walked among us.  It isn’t clear, at least for me, whether the faithless generation Jesus is upset about is the multitudes in verse 14 or the disciples in verse 16.  (I’m leaning its the disciples – gulp!)  No matter – the point is that no faith was evident, Jesus was upset and it is the disciples that could not heal the lunatic.
I find it instructive that if Jesus was referring to the disciples, and I think He was, right after the rebuke, the disciples came to Him, asking of thier failure.
They were teachable – He was of the nature that He could rebuke and still find in His disciples a willingness to come to Him.  Maybe the disciples were extremely humble (really Carl?) or maybe, just maybe, the disciples understood the grace He lived that any hurtful truth did not negate His deep love for His followers – They knew He  spoke truth, and that He was full of grace – Who else could they go to?
Do not be faithless!
Exercise the gift of faith that resides in you and trust in the only One who truly deserves your  love and life.  Consider the gospel of the grace of God – the sacrifice of His only Son and that while we were enemies of both the Son and the Father! 
Do not reject love! 

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Faith – Peíthō – Yield

Faith 2As mentioned in my introduction to faith post, I was in Sunday School class a while back and had the opportunity to discuss Christian maturity with the teacher, and as you may have guessed, we wandered off into the subject of faith.

Faith

He had told me there are a number of Greek words in the New Testament that are translated “faith” in our English Bible, and I let him know I thought otherwise.

So I came home and did a quick study, using Blue Letter Bible web site.  The following table gives a summary of the New Testament Greek words used when describing our English word “faith”.

Strongs # Greek Transliterated English Equivalent
New Testament (Greek) for “faith”
G571 ἄπιστος apistos that believe not, unbelieving, faithless, unbeliever, infidel, thing incredible, which believe not
G1680 ἐλπίς elpis hope, faith
G3640 ὀλιγόπιστος oligopistos of little faith
G4102 πίστις pistis faith, assurance, believe, belief, them that believe, fidelity
G4103 πιστός pistos faithful, believe, believing, true, faithfully, believer, sure not tr
G6066 ὀλιγοπιστία oligopistia littleness of faith

faith 4I’m glad he challenged me to look it up and I think we were both sort of correct.

The root word found in each of the above greek words is pistos/pistis, and when checked in that web site I like (see above), both are derived from the Greek word “peíthō”.

Strong’s Definitions
πείθω peíthō, pi’-tho; a primary verb; to convince (by argument, true or false); by analogy, to pacify or conciliate (by other fair means); reflexively or passively, to assent (to evidence or authority), to rely (by inward certainty):—agree, assure, believe, have confidence, be (wax) conflent, make friend, obey, persuade, trust, yield.
For future posts, I would like to explore the concept of faith, and each of the terms found in the table above.  But for now, I would like to consider the root word peíthō.

Peíthō

In the Strongs Concordance definition above I have italicized a number of synonyms that are synonyms for the root word Peíthō.  
Consider the following shade of the Greek word Peíthō.
Yield
yieldThis synonym, in my thoughts, is linked to “obey”
Granted, in terms of the process of obeying, yielding will obviously be a decision made prior to the act of obedience.
And this yielding will also be dependent on having the knowledge of His will, agreeing to it (see above) and then following through with the obeying.
To “Peíthō” is to yield to the One who is the object of faith.
When I starting looking into this short study, after chatting with my brother in Sunday School, I thought I knew the direction I would go with it.  Thankfully, the Word is so full of truth gems that even a dolt like myself can fall into a deeper understanding of faith.  For this I am thankful and would happily consider your thoughts on the subject.
By the way, how is your Peíthō?
Are you agreeable to the One on the throne, believing and growing in confidence is His wisdom and abilities, obeying the known will of the Father and actively yielding?
Our next study will begin with the greek word “Apistos”  Hope to see you then!

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Faith – Peíthō – Obey

Faith 2As mentioned in my introduction to faith post, I was in Sunday School class a while back and had the opportunity to discuss Christian maturity with the teacher, and as you may have guessed, we wandered off into the subject of faith.

Faith

He had told me there are a number of Greek words in the New Testament that are translated “faith” in our English Bible, and I let him know I thought otherwise.

So I came home and did a quick study, using Blue Letter Bible web site.  The following table gives a summary of the New Testament Greek words used when describing our English word “faith”.

Strongs # Greek Transliterated English Equivalent
New Testament (Greek) for “faith”
G571 ἄπιστος apistos that believe not, unbelieving, faithless, unbeliever, infidel, thing incredible, which believe not
G1680 ἐλπίς elpis hope, faith
G3640 ὀλιγόπιστος oligopistos of little faith
G4102 πίστις pistis faith, assurance, believe, belief, them that believe, fidelity
G4103 πιστός pistos faithful, believe, believing, true, faithfully, believer, sure not tr
G6066 ὀλιγοπιστία oligopistia littleness of faith

faith 4I’m glad he challenged me to look it up and I think we were both sort of correct.

The root word found in each of the above greek words is pistos/pistis, and when checked in that web site I like (see above), both are derived from the Greek word “peíthō”.

Strong’s Definitions
πείθω peíthō, pi’-tho; a primary verb; to convince (by argument, true or false); by analogy, to pacify or conciliate (by other fair means); reflexively or passively, to assent (to evidence or authority), to rely (by inward certainty):—agree, assure, believe, have confidence, be (wax) conflent, make friend, obey, persuade, trust, yield.
For future posts, I would like to explore the concept of faith, and each of the terms found in the table above.  But for now, I would like to consider the root word peíthō.

Peíthō

In the Strongs Concordance definition above I have italicized a number of synonyms that are synonyms for the root word Peíthō.  
Consider the following shade of the Greek word Peíthō.
Obey

This has got to be the hardest synonym to discuss, given the current condition of the modern church and my own weakness and failings.

Many times in the New Testament, Jesus tells His disciples that to love Him is to obey Him. 

John 14:15

If you love me, you will keep my commandments.

John 14:23

Jesus answered him, “If anyone loves me, he will keep my word, and my Father will love him, and we will come to him and make our home with him.

Yes – but I think there is even more to it!.

John 13:35

By this all people will know that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another.”

If we obey Him, we show the world that we love Him.

And as I try to understand the gospel, it is becoming apparent to me that one who realizes I love Jesus due to my obedience to His will is the one who is typing this message.  Yes, although I am in the world, and have been told I am not part of it, I still gain (have) confidence (see above) through my active participation in the known will of God for my life.

Consider.

To “Peíthō” is to obey the One who is the object of faith.

One more post on the word Peíthō, and I will ask you to YIELD to the desire to visit.  Hope to see you then.

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Faith – Peíthō – Have Confidence

Faith 2As mentioned in my introduction to faith post, I was in Sunday School class a while back and had the opportunity to discuss Christian maturity with the teacher, and as you may have guessed, we wandered off into the subject of faith.

Faith

He had told me there are a number of Greek words in the New Testament that are translated “faith” in our English Bible, and I let him know I thought otherwise.

So I came home and did a quick study, using Blue Letter Bible web site.  The following table gives a summary of the New Testament Greek words used when describing our English word “faith”.

Strongs # Greek Transliterated English Equivalent
New Testament (Greek) for “faith”
G571 ἄπιστος apistos that believe not, unbelieving, faithless, unbeliever, infidel, thing incredible, which believe not
G1680 ἐλπίς elpis hope, faith
G3640 ὀλιγόπιστος oligopistos of little faith
G4102 πίστις pistis faith, assurance, believe, belief, them that believe, fidelity
G4103 πιστός pistos faithful, believe, believing, true, faithfully, believer, sure not tr
G6066 ὀλιγοπιστία oligopistia littleness of faith

faith 4I’m glad he challenged me to look it up and I think we were both sort of correct.

The root word found in each of the above greek words is pistos/pistis, and when checked in that web site I like (see above), both are derived from the Greek word “peíthō”.

Strong’s Definitions
πείθω peíthō, pi’-tho; a primary verb; to convince (by argument, true or false); by analogy, to pacify or conciliate (by other fair means); reflexively or passively, to assent (to evidence or authority), to rely (by inward certainty):—agree, assure, believe, have confidence, be (wax) conflent, make friend, obey, persuade, trust, yield.
For future posts, I would like to explore the concept of faith, and each of the terms found in the table above.  But for now, I would like to consider the root word peíthō.

Peíthō

In the Strongs Concordance definition above I have italicized a number of synonyms that are synonyms for the root word Peíthō.  
Consider the following shades of the Greek word Peíthō.
Have Confidence
Confidence As mentioned above, and as further clarification (I hope) of the thought above, having confidence I feel is the continually growing and deepening of the initial belief.
As I have falteringly followed the Master through this journey, I have found His trustworthiness to be beyond my original hopes.  His mercies are new everyday and I have sensed a growing confidence in the Saviors ability (not mine!) to guide and protect, to supply and correct, to help and to encourage.
To “Peíthō” is to have confidence in the One who is the object of faith.
Will you OBEY your curiosity and come visit my next post?  Hope so, since I am really enjoying this study and hope to hear from those who find value in the posts.  Thanks again!

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Faith – Peíthō – Believe

Faith 2As mentioned in my introduction to faith post, I was in Sunday School class a while back and had the opportunity to discuss Christian maturity with the teacher, and as you may have guessed, we wandered off into the subject of faith.

Faith

He had told me there are a number of Greek words in the New Testament that are translated “faith” in our English Bible, and I let him know I thought otherwise.

So I came home and did a quick study, using Blue Letter Bible web site.  The following table gives a summary of the New Testament Greek words used when describing our English word “faith”.

Strongs # Greek Transliterated English Equivalent
New Testament (Greek) for “faith”
G571 ἄπιστος apistos that believe not, unbelieving, faithless, unbeliever, infidel, thing incredible, which believe not
G1680 ἐλπίς elpis hope, faith
G3640 ὀλιγόπιστος oligopistos of little faith
G4102 πίστις pistis faith, assurance, believe, belief, them that believe, fidelity
G4103 πιστός pistos faithful, believe, believing, true, faithfully, believer, sure not tr
G6066 ὀλιγοπιστία oligopistia littleness of faith

faith 4I’m glad he challenged me to look it up and I think we were both sort of correct.

The root word found in each of the above greek words is pistos/pistis, and when checked in that web site I like (see above), both are derived from the Greek word “peíthō”.

Strong’s Definitions
πείθω peíthō, pi’-tho; a primary verb; to convince (by argument, true or false); by analogy, to pacify or conciliate (by other fair means); reflexively or passively, to assent (to evidence or authority), to rely (by inward certainty):—agree, assure, believe, have confidence, be (wax) conflent, make friend, obey, persuade, trust, yield.
For future posts, I would like to explore the concept of faith, and each of the terms found in the table above.  But for now, I would like to consider the root word peíthō.

Peíthō

In the Strongs Concordance definition above I have italicized a number of synonyms that are synonyms for the root word Peíthō.  
Consider the following shade of the Greek word Peíthō.
Believe
Believe 2
I suppose it is obvious that the root word for faith has a synonym of believe, but it may be instructive to consider that the next synonym given, is the term “Have confidence”
Difference?  I don’t know “off the top” what the difference is, but I am willing to consider a difference since both descriptive terms were supplied.  To believe, I sense is to have the mental assent of a fact, to consider a message true.
To believe is to accept an opinion, a statement, a message, a thought or a concept.  It is the seed of faith, out of which all confidence, agreement, obedience and yielding grow.  It is the germ of life out of which grows the fully mature Christian life.
To “Peíthō” is to believe the One who is the object of faith.
Come visit our next post.  I HAVE CONFIDENCE you will gain a bit more appreciation for the full meaning of Peíthō.  See you then!

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Faith – Peíthō – Agree

Faith 2As mentioned in my introduction to faith post, I was in Sunday School class a while back and had the opportunity to discuss Christian maturity with the teacher, and as you may have guessed, we wandered off into the subject of faith.

Faith

He had told me there are a number of Greek words in the New Testament that are translated “faith” in our English Bible, and I let him know I thought otherwise.

So I came home and did a quick study, using Blue Letter Bible web site.  The following table gives a summary of the New Testament Greek words used when describing our English word “faith”.

Strongs # Greek Transliterated English Equivalent
New Testament (Greek) for “faith”
G571 ἄπιστος apistos that believe not, unbelieving, faithless, unbeliever, infidel, thing incredible, which believe not
G1680 ἐλπίς elpis hope, faith
G3640 ὀλιγόπιστος oligopistos of little faith
G4102 πίστις pistis faith, assurance, believe, belief, them that believe, fidelity
G4103 πιστός pistos faithful, believe, believing, true, faithfully, believer, sure not tr
G6066 ὀλιγοπιστία oligopistia littleness of faith

faith 4I’m glad he challenged me to look it up and I think we were both sort of correct.

The root word found in each of the above greek words is pistos/pistis, and when checked in that web site I like (see above), both are derived from the Greek word “peíthō”.

Strong’s Definitions
πείθω peíthō, pi’-tho; a primary verb; to convince (by argument, true or false); by analogy, to pacify or conciliate (by other fair means); reflexively or passively, to assent (to evidence or authority), to rely (by inward certainty):—agree, assure, believe, have confidence, be (wax) conflent, make friend, obey, persuade, trust, yield.
For future posts, I would like to explore the concept of faith, and each of the terms found in the table above.  But for now, I would like to consider the root word peíthō.

Peíthō

In the Strongs Concordance definition above I have italicized a number of words that are synonyms for the root word Peíthō.  
Consider the following shade of the Greek word Peíthō.
AgreeAgree
A long time ago, when I was studying the concept of confession, I tripped over the following verse.

Act 23:8

For the Sadducees say that there is no resurrection, neither angel, nor spirit: but the Pharisees confess both.

I confess that the word “confess” is not based on the root word we are considering, but the idea of agreement is.  The Pharisees confess the resurrection, and of spirits and angels.  Did they believe in the Messiah?  That is not the point in this passage.  The point is that they had mental assent to the teaching, agreed with others, and stood firm on the truthfulness of the resurrection and of spirits.  (The point of the passage is that Paul used the Pharisee’s agreement to the resurrection in order to distract his enemies from his case – What a guy!)
It is easy to see the idea of “agree” within the root word for faith.
How can I trust or believe, obey or yield to One with whom I am not in agreement.
As Christians we seek to understand His will (albeit weakly and without full knowledge at times) and in understanding His will, have to decide to agree or disagree to it.
To “Peíthō” is to agree with the One who is the object of faith.
Will you come visit my next post? I BELIEVE you will find something of value.  Looking forward to your comments.

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Faith – Introduction

Faith 2

I was in Sunday School class early this morning and had the opportunity to discuss Christian maturity with the teacher. As we chatted, we wandered off into the subject of faith.

For the next few posts, I hope to delve a little into the concept of faith, and its real world applications for our lives.

Faith

He had told me there are a number of Greek words in the New Testament that are translated “faith” in our English Bible, and I let him know I thought otherwise.

So I came home and did a quick study, using the Blue Letter Bible web site. The following table gives a summary of the New Testament Greek words used when describing our English word “faith”.

Strongs # Greek Transliterated English Equivalent
New Testament (Greek) for “faith”
G571 ἄπιστος apistos that believe not, unbelieving, faithless, unbeliever, infidel, thing incredible, which believe not
G1680 ἐλπίς elpis hope, faith
G3640 ὀλιγόπιστος oligopistos of little faith
G4102 πίστις pistis faith, assurance, believe, belief, them that believe, fidelity
G4103 πιστός pistos faithful, believe, believing, true, faithfully, believer, sure not tr
G6066 ὀλιγοπιστία oligopistia littleness of faith

faith 4

I’m glad he challenged me to look it up and I think we were both sort of correct.

The root word found in each of the above greek words is pistos/pistis, and when checked in that web site I like (see above), both are derived from the Greek word “peíthō”.

Strong’s Definitions
πείθω peíthō, pi’-tho; a primary verb; to convince (by argument, true or false); by analogy, to pacify or conciliate (by other fair means); reflexively or passively, to assent (to evidence or authority), to rely (by inward certainty):—agree, assure, believe, have confidence, be (wax) conflent, make friend, obey, persuade, trust, yield. (Boldened words will be topics for next few blogs)
As our study progresses into each of the greek terms defined above, I would like to explore the concept of faith.
For the short term, I would like to consider the root word peíthō, as it is the most interesting of the greek words above, primarily since it has been the word I have been recently studying.
Watch for my next post – I hope you will AGREE to come visit.

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Stupid Idiots – A Response

Stupid Idiots

I went to hear a brother speak a while back that advocated that Christians should be “stupid idiots”. (His words, not mine!)

To give this brother the benefit of the doubt, and to find out what the intent of the message was, I set off on a wee bit of study into Acts 4:13, his text for the day.

After my preliminary study, I decided to contact this brother, share with him what I found in my study, discuss his message and ask for any clarification. What follows is the email I received from this brother after sending my study to him.


Carl,

Your very e-mail fully supports the whole point of the message. In fact, I shared the exact terms from your e-mail in my message. The contrast seen in this passage is between Peter and John and the learned and wise religious leaders, the very people who made the comments about them. The key was that they took note that these men had been with Jesus. We need the same today accusations from the same people who are so smart and wise (like the religious of this context) against us today. So yes, the terms are beautiful, especially as people take note that we have been with Jesus, that very necessary observation that will make religious leaders take note to label us as stupid idiots. I made it clear that spending time in the Word is what enables us to be perceived this way by the religious. So the beautiful context shows what happens to followers of Christ when they speak filled with the Holy Spirit. They will be labeled stupid idiots by the religious who don’t see miracles for what they are and haven’t spent time with Jesus. We are willing to face death rather than be “wise’ about our words before people who could kill us. I don’t think you misunderstood my message at all.

Pastor Y

_____________________________________

I appreciate this brothers efforts to clarify the issue, but in my mind, the issue is still very muddy. Should Christians seek the label of “stupid idiots”?

In summary, I think the greek words might be better understood as being untrained (unlettered), and unprofessional (a layman).

These words do not say anything directly as to the intelligence or ability of the apostles, but simply the training and associations the apostles had in relation to those judging them.

(BTW – I think it is ironic that this man is a trained professional!)

What think ye?

Should Christians seek the label of “stupid idiots”?


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Stupid Idiots – A Description

Stupid Idiots

I went to hear a brother speak a while back that advocated that Christians should be “stupid idiots”. (His words, not mine!)

To give this brother the benefit of the doubt, and to find out what the intent of the message was, I set off on a wee bit of study into Acts 4:13, his text for the day.

After my preliminary study, I decided to contact this brother, share with him what I found in my study, discuss his message and ask for any clarification. What follows is the beginning of the correspondence I had with this brother.


Act 4:13 Now when they saw the boldness of Peter and John, and perceived that they were unlearned and ignorant men, they marvelled; and they took knowledge of them, that they had been with Jesus.

A Description or a Command?

With all these technical definitions, it remains that this verse is an estimation of the apostles by the enemies of the gospel, and not an imperative for Christians to obey.

I wonder if telling the congregation to become “stupid idiots” based on Acts 4:13 was wise. In a society that is increasingly being “dumbed down”, I would hope that Christianity would argue against the trend. I surely do not advocate knowledge for the sake of knowledge, for

“knowledge puffeth up, but love edifieth”.

The critical motivating factor and fruit in a believers heart, mind and soul is love to the Master and our neighbor. But the great commandment does include our minds, and that presupposes the intake of (proper) knowledge.

As I was discussing the message with my daughter, I remembered that the apostle Paul described himself (and his entourage) as “fools for Christ” in 1 Cor 4:10. Could Paul have been describing himself from the Corinthians viewpoint (ironically), and not from a point of motivation for him (us) to look to.

I know you believe that the body of Christ is made up of all kinds of folk, some common (like myself) and some professionally trained in the “rabbinical” schools of today. He is big enough to use any person who will spend time with Him and be willing to grow in grace and the knowledge of our Lord Jesus Christ.

I do appreciate the ability to converse with you – I look forward to your reply. I am sure I have misunderstood your intent and appreciate your time in helping me understand.

Thanks for your labors

Carl

What think ye? Should Christians seek the label of “stupid idiots”?

In our next post, we will review his response.


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Stupid Idiots – Unlearned Christians

Stupid IdiotsI went to hear a brother speak a while back that advocated that Christians should be “stupid idiots”.  (His words, not mine!)

To give this brother the benefit of the doubt, and to find out what the intent of the message was, I set off on a wee bit of study into Acts 4:13, his text for the day.

After my preliminary study, I decided to contact this brother, share with him what I found in my study, discuss his message and ask for any clarification.  What follows is the beginning of the correspondence I had with this brother.


Pastor Y

If it isn’t to much, I would like to ask for some clarification. I hope I do not come off as critical or judgmental, but I am concerned about truth and aim to be gracious in my concerns (John 1:18).

During the message today, you were exhorting us to be “stupid idiots”. Surely I am misunderstanding your intent when you say that, and I think others may have also. (At least my daughter was confused.)

I took a look at the verse(s) in Acts that you were referring to and found the following (Forgive the KJV, but I have spent too much time in it to give it up!!)

Act 4:13 Now when they saw the boldness of Peter and John, and perceived that they were unlearned and ignorant men, they marvelled; and they took knowledge of them, that they had been with Jesus.

First off – unlearned (Strongs 62)

Vines states – “Unlearned (ἀγράμματοι) Or, very literally, unlettered. With special reference to Rabbinic culture, the absence of which was conspicuous in Peter’s address.”

Robertson states – “They were unlearned (agrammatoi eisin). Present indicative retained in indirect discourse. Unlettered men without technical training in the professional rabbinical schools of Hillel or Shammai. Jesus himself was so regarded (John 7:15, “not having learned letters”). ”

Clarke states – “Αγραμματοι, Persons without literature, not brought up in nor given to literary pursuits.”

ISBE states – “Unlearned un-lûr´ned: Acts 4:13 for ἀγράμματος, agrámmatos, literally “illiterate.” But nothing more than “lacking technical rabbinical instruction” seems to be meant…”

I am not sure if “stupid” and “lacking training” are synonymous. I have known many men and women, both believers and unbelievers, that are lacking in training but I would never consider stupid. (And some who have much training but….)

What think ye?

Should Christians seek the label of “stupid idiots”?


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Stupid Idiots – Introduction

Stupid IdiotsMany times I have heard that Christians are idiots, dumber than a bag of hammers, fools, brain dead… You get my point, right?

Well I went to hear a brother speak a while back that advocated that Christians should be “stupid idiots”.  (His words, not mine!)

During the message, I expected one of two things to happen

  • I would understand his underlying premise and it would finally click, that is, that I would understand the bigger message.
  • The brother would at some point, use the message to rebuke us for our intellectual weakness.

I was wrong on both points, but I clung on to the first point until after the service.  I got home and began to discuss the message with my family, and we were all confused.  It seems we all got the message that Christians should be stupid idiots.

This man is a professional communicator leading one of the larger churches in the area.  The idea that he was misunderstood by my wife, my two daughters and myself was too much for me to swallow!  How could this be?

To give this brother the benefit of the doubt, and to find out what the intent of the message was, I set off on a wee bit of study into Acts 4:13, his text for the day.

After my preliminary study, I decided to contact this brother, share with him what I found in my study, discuss his message and ask for any clarification.  What follows in my next post is the beginning of the correspondence I sent this brother.

What think ye?  Before we go on to our next post, let me know what you think.

Should Christians seek the label of “stupid idiots”?


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