Patience – Required to Inherit the Promises

Patience – No one asks for it. To do so, brings catastrophe. At least in the here and now.Patience 2

Yet, as painful as trials are, exercising patience in the trials of our lives, produces plenty of fruit.

Hebrews 12:9-11

9 Besides this, we have had earthly fathers who disciplined us and we respected them. Shall we not much more be subject to the Father of spirits and live?

10 For they disciplined us for a short time as it seemed best to them, but he disciplines us for our good, that we may share his holiness.

11 For the moment all discipline seems painful rather than pleasant, but later it yields the peaceful fruit of righteousness to those who have been trained by it.

Patience 3

Patience is Required to Inherit the Promises

Romans 2:5-8 (note verse 7)

5 But because of your hard and impenitent heart you are storing up wrath for yourself on the day of wrath when God’s righteous judgment will be revealed.

6 He will render to each one according to his works:

7 to those who by patience in well-doing seek for glory and honor and immortality, he will give eternal life;

8 but for those who are self-seeking and do not obey the truth, but obey unrighteousness, there will be wrath and fury.

Paul is speaking something hard here.

Verse 6 speaks of judgment according to deeds.  (A fairly consistent teaching in the Word It fairly surprised me coming from the evangelical background of my past.)

The hard thing is that Paul links immortality / eternal life somehow with patient continuance in good works.  How you work that out in your mind is up to you, but no matter how you do it, it is obvious that patience is necessary.

Hebrews 6:12, 15

12 so that you may not be sluggish, but imitators of those who through faith and patience inherit the promises. …

15 And thus Abraham, having patiently waited, obtained the promise.

Inheriting the promises and obtaining the promise.  For the sake of staying on focus concerning patience, I won’t venture into why “promises” in verse 12 morphs into a singular promise in verse 15.  It may be immaterial.  The point is, Abraham had a promise and it wasn’t realized until all his time was “wasted.”

Sometimes patience is hardest to exercise due to our lack of understanding God’s promise.  But Abraham eventually understood.  Through patience, he obtained the promise.

Hebrews 10:36

36 For you have need of endurance, so that when you have done the will of God you may receive what is promised.

Whoever wrote Hebrews was beating the same drum again.  Christians need to exercise patience.  We are on this earth to perform the will of God.  After that, the promise will be received.  Consider what Abraham had to do, between first hearing the promise and actually realizing the promise.  He was told to…

  • Leave his family behind.
  • Leave his country behind.
  • Leave his gods behind.
  • Leave his security behind.
  • Leave his reputation behind.

I think you get the point.  Abraham had to exercise incredible patience with the demands put upon him.  We often think of him as the father of our faith, and rightly so, but the patience he exercised while his promise of an heir seemed to vaporize was incredible.

Not perfect, but incredible.

We have to exercise patience as we see some of our hopes and dreams seemingly vaporize in our lives.  Patience isn’t patience if everything is going the way we want it to go!

Consider.

Patience 1


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End Notes
1  The following information is found in The Complete Word Study Dictionary, AMG Publishers. (emphasis mine)
G2347 – θλίψις – thlípsis; gen. thlípseōs, fem. noun from thlíbō (G2346), to crush, press, compress, squeeze, which is from thláō (n.f.), to break. Tribulation, trouble, affliction.
(I) In a figurative manner, pressure from evils, affliction, distress (2Co_2:4; Php_1:16); of a woman in travail (Joh_16:21). Often as a metonym for evils by which one is pressed, i.e., affliction, distress, calamity (Mat_13:21; Act_7:10-11; Rom_5:3; 2Co_1:4; Heb_10:33). In apposition in Mar_13:19. With the syn. stenochōría (G4730), literally narrowness of room, anguish, distress (Rom_2:9); with anágkē (G318), constraint, necessity (2Co_6:4; 1Th_3:7). See Sept.: 1Sa_10:19; Psa_119:143; Isa_8:22.
(II) Related to stenochōría (G4730), distress, narrowness, occurring only four times with the connotation of narrowness, from stenós (G4728), narrow of room, confined space. In three of the four occurrences in the NT, stenochōría is associated with thlípsis (Rom_2:9; Rom_8:35; 2Co_6:4). Thlípsis refers more to being crushed while stenōchoría refers more to narrowness of room or discomfort. Tribulation may affect either body or mind or both.
2  The following information is found in The Complete Word Study Dictionary, AMG Publishers. (emphasis mine)
Patience – G5281 ὑπομονή hupomone
to persevere, remain under. A bearing up under, patience, endurance as to things or circumstances
Hupomonḗ is associated with hope (1Th_1:3) and refers to that quality of character which does not allow one to surrender to circumstances or succumb under trial.
Generally meaning endurance, patience, perseverance or constancy under suffering in faith and duty.
Specifically patience as a quality of mind, the bearing of evils and suffering with tranquil mind.
Longsuffering – G3115 μακροθυμία makrothumía;
To be long-suffering. Forbearance, long-suffering, self-restraint before proceeding to action. The quality of a person who is able to avenge himself yet refrains from doing so
In Heb_6:15, makrothuméō (G3114) is used of Abraham’s patient faith in God under the pressure of trying circumstances (Jas_5:7-8).
Makrothumía is patience in respect to persons while hupomonḗ (G5281), endurance, is putting up with things or circumstances. Both words are often found together (2Co_6:4, 2Co_6:6; 2Ti_3:10).
Makrothumía is associated with mercy (éleos [G1656]) and is used of God.

Patience – A Goal in the Christian Life

Patience – No one asks for it. To do so, brings catastrophe. At least in the here and now.Patience 2

Yet, as painful as trials are, exercising patience in the trials of our lives, produces plenty of fruit.

Hebrews 12:9-11

9 Besides this, we have had earthly fathers who disciplined us and we respected them. Shall we not much more be subject to the Father of spirits and live?

10 For they disciplined us for a short time as it seemed best to them, but he disciplines us for our good, that we may share his holiness.

11 For the moment all discipline seems painful rather than pleasant, but later it yields the peaceful fruit of righteousness to those who have been trained by it.

Patience 3

Patience is a Goal in the Christian Life

Colossians 1:9-11

9 And so, from the day we heard, we have not ceased to pray for you, asking that you may be filled with the knowledge of his will in all spiritual wisdom and understanding,

10 so as to walk in a manner worthy of the Lord, fully pleasing to him: bearing fruit in every good work and increasing in the knowledge of God;

11 being strengthened with all power, according to his glorious might, for all endurance and patience with joy,

I have often considered this set of verses my favorite text in the Bible.  So much in the prayer of Paul for the Colossians, and it all ends with patience and longsuffering.

But isn’t patience the same thing as longsuffering?

There are many similarities between these two terms.

I really like the explanation given by the The Complete Word Study Dictionary, AMG Publishers.

Longsuffering (makrothumía) is patience in respect to persons while patience (hupomone) endurance, is putting up with things or circumstances. Both words are often found together (2Co_6:4, 2Co_6:6; 2Ti_3:10).

Paul doesn’t leave much room for a believer to be impatient.

Patience 1


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End Notes
1  The following information is found in The Complete Word Study Dictionary, AMG Publishers. (emphasis mine)
G2347 – θλίψις – thlípsis; gen. thlípseōs, fem. noun from thlíbō (G2346), to crush, press, compress, squeeze, which is from thláō (n.f.), to break. Tribulation, trouble, affliction.
(I) In a figurative manner, pressure from evils, affliction, distress (2Co_2:4; Php_1:16); of a woman in travail (Joh_16:21). Often as a metonym for evils by which one is pressed, i.e., affliction, distress, calamity (Mat_13:21; Act_7:10-11; Rom_5:3; 2Co_1:4; Heb_10:33). In apposition in Mar_13:19. With the syn. stenochōría (G4730), literally narrowness of room, anguish, distress (Rom_2:9); with anágkē (G318), constraint, necessity (2Co_6:4; 1Th_3:7). See Sept.: 1Sa_10:19; Psa_119:143; Isa_8:22.
(II) Related to stenochōría (G4730), distress, narrowness, occurring only four times with the connotation of narrowness, from stenós (G4728), narrow of room, confined space. In three of the four occurrences in the NT, stenochōría is associated with thlípsis (Rom_2:9; Rom_8:35; 2Co_6:4). Thlípsis refers more to being crushed while stenōchoría refers more to narrowness of room or discomfort. Tribulation may affect either body or mind or both.
2  The following information is found in The Complete Word Study Dictionary, AMG Publishers. (emphasis mine)
Patience – G5281 ὑπομονή hupomone
to persevere, remain under. A bearing up under, patience, endurance as to things or circumstances
Hupomonḗ is associated with hope (1Th_1:3) and refers to that quality of character which does not allow one to surrender to circumstances or succumb under trial.
Generally meaning endurance, patience, perseverance or constancy under suffering in faith and duty.
Specifically patience as a quality of mind, the bearing of evils and suffering with tranquil mind.
Longsuffering – G3115 μακροθυμία makrothumía;
To be long-suffering. Forbearance, long-suffering, self-restraint before proceeding to action. The quality of a person who is able to avenge himself yet refrains from doing so
In Heb_6:15, makrothuméō (G3114) is used of Abraham’s patient faith in God under the pressure of trying circumstances (Jas_5:7-8).
Makrothumía is patience in respect to persons while hupomonḗ (G5281), endurance, is putting up with things or circumstances. Both words are often found together (2Co_6:4, 2Co_6:6; 2Ti_3:10).
Makrothumía is associated with mercy (éleos [G1656]) and is used of God.

Patience – Brings Two Fruits

Patience – No one asks for it. To do so, brings catastrophe. At least in the here and now.

Patience 2

 

Hebrews 12:9-11

9 Besides this, we have had earthly fathers who disciplined us and we respected them. Shall we not much more be subject to the Father of spirits and live?

10 For they disciplined us for a short time as it seemed best to them, but he disciplines us for our good, that we may share his holiness.

11 For the moment all discipline seems painful rather than pleasant, but later it yields the peaceful fruit of righteousness to those who have been trained by it.

Patience Brings Two Fruits

Yet, as painful as trials are, exercising patience in the trials of our lives, produces mucho fruito.  The patience exercised during a time of discipline allows us to share in His love.

Nope – that is not what it says Carl – Read the Word!!!

The patience we exercise during painful trials gives two fruits.

Fruit one is sharing His holiness.  Whaaaa?  Share His holiness – that is a bit beyond me right now.  I’m gonna have to ponder on that for a spell.  Reckon I will need some porch time.

Fruit two is the peaceful fruit of righteousness.  This is awesome. So often when I think of righteousness, I think of conflict, striving to do right, fighting the good fight.

This fruit of righteousness is peaceful.  Consider the ramifications of that statement.  How different than my expectations of what the Word should say.

Patience 3

 


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End Notes
1 The following information is found in The Complete Word Study Dictionary, AMG Publishers. (emphasis mine)
G2347 – θλίψις – thlípsis; gen. thlípseōs, fem. noun from thlíbō (G2346), to crush, press, compress, squeeze, which is from thláō (n.f.), to break. Tribulation, trouble, affliction.
(I) In a figurative manner, pressure from evils, affliction, distress (2Co_2:4; Php_1:16); of a woman in travail (Joh_16:21). Often as a metonym for evils by which one is pressed, i.e., affliction, distress, calamity (Mat_13:21; Act_7:10-11; Rom_5:3; 2Co_1:4; Heb_10:33). In apposition in Mar_13:19. With the syn. stenochōría (G4730), literally narrowness of room, anguish, distress (Rom_2:9); with anágkē (G318), constraint, necessity (2Co_6:4; 1Th_3:7). See Sept.: 1Sa_10:19; Psa_119:143; Isa_8:22.
(II) Related to stenochōría (G4730), distress, narrowness, occurring only four times with the connotation of narrowness, from stenós (G4728), narrow of room, confined space. In three of the four occurrences in the NT, stenochōría is associated with thlípsis (Rom_2:9; Rom_8:35; 2Co_6:4). Thlípsis refers more to being crushed while stenōchoría refers more to narrowness of room or discomfort. Tribulation may affect either body or mind or both.
2 The following information is found in The Complete Word Study Dictionary, AMG Publishers. (emphasis mine)
Patience – G5281 ὑπομονή hupomone
to persevere, remain under. A bearing up under, patience, endurance as to things or circumstances
Hupomonḗ is associated with hope (1Th_1:3) and refers to that quality of character which does not allow one to surrender to circumstances or succumb under trial.
Generally meaning endurance, patience, perseverance or constancy under suffering in faith and duty.
Specifically patience as a quality of mind, the bearing of evils and suffering with tranquil mind.
Longsuffering – G3115 μακροθυμία makrothumía;
To be long-suffering. Forbearance, long-suffering, self-restraint before proceeding to action. The quality of a person who is able to avenge himself yet refrains from doing so
In Heb_6:15, makrothuméō (G3114) is used of Abraham’s patient faith in God under the pressure of trying circumstances (Jas_5:7-8).
Makrothumía is patience in respect to persons while hupomonḗ (G5281), endurance, is putting up with things or circumstances. Both words are often found together (2Co_6:4, 2Co_6:6; 2Ti_3:10).
Makrothumía is associated with mercy (éleos [G1656]) and is used of God.

Patience – Brings Experience

Patience – No one asks for it. To do so, brings catastrophe. At least in the here and now.Patience 2

 

 

Patience Brings Experience

Romans 5:3, 4

3 Not only that, but we rejoice in our sufferings, knowing that suffering produces endurance,

4 and endurance produces character, and character produces hope,

This is the famous text, that when mentioned in a study, invariably invokes a statement like – “Oh Carl – don’t ask for patience – all you are gonna get is problems!”

I suppose asking for tribulation is not prescribed here, but when tribulation (pressure) does come, it is not to be feared, although that seems to be my first reaction. If we understand that pressure works patience in us, and we have our long term goals correctly positioned in our lives, we can glory (boast, exult?) in our tribulations.

I need work in this!

I have seen that in the past 3 decades, as my wifey and I go through tough times, the experience we gain, by properly reacting (occasionally) gives us experience to fall back on in future trials. We have learned experientially that the Lord is merciful, kind, full of goodness and tender hearted to His people.

Have you experienced the kindness of the Lord lately?

Be patient.

Patience 1


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End Notes
1 The following information is found in The Complete Word Study Dictionary, AMG Publishers. (emphasis mine)
G2347 – θλίψις – thlípsis; gen. thlípseōs, fem. noun from thlíbō (G2346), to crush, press, compress, squeeze, which is from thláō (n.f.), to break. Tribulation, trouble, affliction.
(I) In a figurative manner, pressure from evils, affliction, distress (2Co_2:4; Php_1:16); of a woman in travail (Joh_16:21). Often as a metonym for evils by which one is pressed, i.e., affliction, distress, calamity (Mat_13:21; Act_7:10-11; Rom_5:3; 2Co_1:4; Heb_10:33). In apposition in Mar_13:19. With the syn. stenochōría (G4730), literally narrowness of room, anguish, distress (Rom_2:9); with anágkē (G318), constraint, necessity (2Co_6:4; 1Th_3:7). See Sept.: 1Sa_10:19; Psa_119:143; Isa_8:22.
(II) Related to stenochōría (G4730), distress, narrowness, occurring only four times with the connotation of narrowness, from stenós (G4728), narrow of room, confined space. In three of the four occurrences in the NT, stenochōría is associated with thlípsis (Rom_2:9; Rom_8:35; 2Co_6:4). Thlípsis refers more to being crushed while stenōchoría refers more to narrowness of room or discomfort. Tribulation may affect either body or mind or both.
2 The following information is found in The Complete Word Study Dictionary, AMG Publishers. (emphasis mine)
Patience – G5281 ὑπομονή hupomone
to persevere, remain under. A bearing up under, patience, endurance as to things or circumstances
Hupomonḗ is associated with hope (1Th_1:3) and refers to that quality of character which does not allow one to surrender to circumstances or succumb under trial.
Generally meaning endurance, patience, perseverance or constancy under suffering in faith and duty.
Specifically patience as a quality of mind, the bearing of evils and suffering with tranquil mind.
Longsuffering – G3115 μακροθυμία makrothumía;
To be long-suffering. Forbearance, long-suffering, self-restraint before proceeding to action. The quality of a person who is able to avenge himself yet refrains from doing so
In Heb_6:15, makrothuméō (G3114) is used of Abraham’s patient faith in God under the pressure of trying circumstances (Jas_5:7-8).
Makrothumía is patience in respect to persons while hupomonḗ (G5281), endurance, is putting up with things or circumstances. Both words are often found together (2Co_6:4, 2Co_6:6; 2Ti_3:10).
Makrothumía is associated with mercy (éleos [G1656]) and is used of God.

Patience – Associated with Suffering

Patience – No one asks for it. To do so, brings catastrophe. At least in the here and now.Patience 2

Yet, as painful as trials are, exercising patience in the trials of our lives, produces plenty of fruit.

Hebrews 12:9-11

9 Besides this, we have had earthly fathers who disciplined us and we respected them. Shall we not much more be subject to the Father of spirits and live?

10 For they disciplined us for a short time as it seemed best to them, but he disciplines us for our good, that we may share his holiness.

11 For the moment all discipline seems painful rather than pleasant, but later it yields the peaceful fruit of righteousness to those who have been trained by it.

Patience 3

Patience is Associated with Suffering

2 Thessalonians 1:4

4 Therefore we ourselves boast about you in the churches of God for your steadfastness and faith in all your persecutions and in the afflictions that you are enduring.

Paul boasted of the patience of the Thessalonians.

In our fast paced demanding society, patience is considered to be a hindrance.
We want church growth NOW, and sometimes will stop at nothing to see it happen.  We want instant maturity and will chase every Christian fad to try to find it. We want immediate relief from trials, and will consider every option available.  (Check out 2 Thessalonians 1:6 for Paul’s counsel on our response to tribulations)

Patience is a virtue that our society has sought to degrade.  But the patience of the believer, in the midst of trials, is a reflection of the hope we have in the Lord Jesus.  He is the King of Kings right now.

We can live in that truth.

Romans 12:12

12 Rejoice in hope, be patient in tribulation, be constant in prayer.

In the midst of a machine gun spray of quick exhortations, Paul mentions hope and patience in the same breath.  Hope is to be rejoiced in. Tribulation is an opportunity to exercise patience.

Note that tribulation, in this verse, is the translation of the greek word thlipsis.

When I see this term, I automatically think of pressure or crushing.  When I am being “crushed”, I find it critical to remember that the crushing is an opportunity, a test to reorient myself to a correct perspective.

But let’s go a bit further.  The term “patient” is the greek work hupomeno.

To be patient means to remain under, to persevere, endure, sustain, bear up under.

So let’s get this straight.  When something is crushing me, I am to remain under it.  I am not to seek an inappropriate escape or relief.  I am to exercise a willingness to remain under, waiting for the salvation of the Lord in each trial.

Story time

Years ago, my wife and I were in the midst of a trial, and we were reading about David’s response to King Saul at the same time.  Over a year and a half, we sought to bless those who persecuted us, and pray for our enemy.

The Lord’s deliverance was very obvious to us.

We sought to remain under the crushing, though many good hearted believers advised us to escape or even seek revenge.  We are thankful for the Scriptures that comforted us in our attempt to be patient!

Be patient – The Lord is good!

Patience 1


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End Notes
1  The following information is found in The Complete Word Study Dictionary, AMG Publishers. (emphasis mine)
G2347 – θλίψις – thlípsis; gen. thlípseōs, fem. noun from thlíbō (G2346), to crush, press, compress, squeeze, which is from thláō (n.f.), to break. Tribulation, trouble, affliction.
(I) In a figurative manner, pressure from evils, affliction, distress (2Co_2:4; Php_1:16); of a woman in travail (Joh_16:21). Often as a metonym for evils by which one is pressed, i.e., affliction, distress, calamity (Mat_13:21; Act_7:10-11; Rom_5:3; 2Co_1:4; Heb_10:33). In apposition in Mar_13:19. With the syn. stenochōría (G4730), literally narrowness of room, anguish, distress (Rom_2:9); with anágkē (G318), constraint, necessity (2Co_6:4; 1Th_3:7). See Sept.: 1Sa_10:19; Psa_119:143; Isa_8:22.
(II) Related to stenochōría (G4730), distress, narrowness, occurring only four times with the connotation of narrowness, from stenós (G4728), narrow of room, confined space. In three of the four occurrences in the NT, stenochōría is associated with thlípsis (Rom_2:9; Rom_8:35; 2Co_6:4). Thlípsis refers more to being crushed while stenōchoría refers more to narrowness of room or discomfort. Tribulation may affect either body or mind or both.
2  The following information is found in The Complete Word Study Dictionary, AMG Publishers. (emphasis mine)
Patience – G5281 ὑπομονή hupomone
to persevere, remain under. A bearing up under, patience, endurance as to things or circumstances
Hupomonḗ is associated with hope (1Th_1:3) and refers to that quality of character which does not allow one to surrender to circumstances or succumb under trial.
Generally meaning endurance, patience, perseverance or constancy under suffering in faith and duty.
Specifically patience as a quality of mind, the bearing of evils and suffering with tranquil mind.
Longsuffering – G3115 μακροθυμία makrothumía;
To be long-suffering. Forbearance, long-suffering, self-restraint before proceeding to action. The quality of a person who is able to avenge himself yet refrains from doing so
In Heb_6:15, makrothuméō (G3114) is used of Abraham’s patient faith in God under the pressure of trying circumstances (Jas_5:7-8).
Makrothumía is patience in respect to persons while hupomonḗ (G5281), endurance, is putting up with things or circumstances. Both words are often found together (2Co_6:4, 2Co_6:6; 2Ti_3:10).
Makrothumía is associated with mercy (éleos [G1656]) and is used of God.

Patience – A Component of Hope

Patience – No one asks for it. To do so, brings catastrophe. At least in the here and now.Patience 2

Yet, as painful as trials are, exercising patience in the trials of our lives, produces plenty of fruit.

Hebrews 12:9-11

9 Besides this, we have had earthly fathers who disciplined us and we respected them. Shall we not much more be subject to the Father of spirits and live?

10 For they disciplined us for a short time as it seemed best to them, but he disciplines us for our good, that we may share his holiness.

11 For the moment all discipline seems painful rather than pleasant, but later it yields the peaceful fruit of righteousness to those who have been trained by it.

Patience 3

Patience is a Component of Hope

Romans 8:25

25 But if we hope for what we do not see, we wait for it with patience.

Patience is not simply waiting! If so, this verse would be non-sensible. Consider  –….then do we wait for it with waiting?

What?

What is the point? No no no.

It is a quality of waiting, a specific manner in which we wait.  It is not simply waiting.  It is, in the midst of a trial, a particular manner in which we handle the delay, the waiting, the seeming frustration of our circumstances.

Romans 15:4

4 For whatever was written in former days was written for our instruction, that through endurance and through the encouragement of the Scriptures we might have hope.

Patience in our daily circumstances, supported by the comfort found in the Scriptures, gives a believer hope.  Without a Scriptural hope, patience is surely an exercise in futility.  Scripture is the foundation we can build upon for a hopeful life, not simply hoping for the best, but for actual future events, the resurrection, the escape from this sinful world, and the release of the sinful tendencies I live with each day.

Like I said, a Scripturally hopeful life.

I need to focus on the big picture when in the midst of uncertainty and confusion.  Jesus did not come to deliver us from minor discomforts (although in His mercy He often does!), but to create in us a reflection of Himself.

Note that it takes both patience and the Scriptures comfort to produce hope in the believer’s life.  This combination I fear, is a lost concept. Many I speak with tend to have a cursory understanding of the Scriptures at best, usually pulling a verse (sometimes out of context) to support their “hope”. Paul mentions that the Scriptures were written for “our learning”, that after “our learning”, we might have hope.

I have assumed too many things in my life!

1 Thessalonians 1:3

3 remembering before our God and Father your work of faith and labor of love and steadfastness of hope in our Lord Jesus Christ.

Again, patience and hope are intrinsically combined.

In the previous verse, patience (along with understanding the message of the Scriptures) produced a hope filled life.  Patience was a foundation on which true hope could be built.

In this verse, patience is an aspect of the very hope itself.  As a believer has hope in the Lord Jesus, patience will be a characteristic of that hope.  If I consider my “hope” to be biblical, and yet am typically impatient, I need to reconsider what type of “hope” I am living in.

Of course, some may question this, referring to the many times the Word records believers asking why God is taking so long.  Patience allows for questions. As a matter of fact, at times patience requires questions to be asked. As we have considered before, patience is not simply waiting, detached from the trial.

Patience 1


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End Notes
1  The following information is found in The Complete Word Study Dictionary, AMG Publishers. (emphasis mine)
G2347 – θλίψις – thlípsis; gen. thlípseōs, fem. noun from thlíbō (G2346), to crush, press, compress, squeeze, which is from thláō (n.f.), to break. Tribulation, trouble, affliction.
(I) In a figurative manner, pressure from evils, affliction, distress (2Co_2:4; Php_1:16); of a woman in travail (Joh_16:21). Often as a metonym for evils by which one is pressed, i.e., affliction, distress, calamity (Mat_13:21; Act_7:10-11; Rom_5:3; 2Co_1:4; Heb_10:33). In apposition in Mar_13:19. With the syn. stenochōría (G4730), literally narrowness of room, anguish, distress (Rom_2:9); with anágkē (G318), constraint, necessity (2Co_6:4; 1Th_3:7). See Sept.: 1Sa_10:19; Psa_119:143; Isa_8:22.
(II) Related to stenochōría (G4730), distress, narrowness, occurring only four times with the connotation of narrowness, from stenós (G4728), narrow of room, confined space. In three of the four occurrences in the NT, stenochōría is associated with thlípsis (Rom_2:9; Rom_8:35; 2Co_6:4). Thlípsis refers more to being crushed while stenōchoría refers more to narrowness of room or discomfort. Tribulation may affect either body or mind or both.
2  The following information is found in The Complete Word Study Dictionary, AMG Publishers. (emphasis mine)
Patience – G5281 ὑπομονή hupomone
to persevere, remain under. A bearing up under, patience, endurance as to things or circumstances
Hupomonḗ is associated with hope (1Th_1:3) and refers to that quality of character which does not allow one to surrender to circumstances or succumb under trial.
Generally meaning endurance, patience, perseverance or constancy under suffering in faith and duty.
Specifically patience as a quality of mind, the bearing of evils and suffering with tranquil mind.
Longsuffering – G3115 μακροθυμία makrothumía;
To be long-suffering. Forbearance, long-suffering, self-restraint before proceeding to action. The quality of a person who is able to avenge himself yet refrains from doing so
In Heb_6:15, makrothuméō (G3114) is used of Abraham’s patient faith in God under the pressure of trying circumstances (Jas_5:7-8).
Makrothumía is patience in respect to persons while hupomonḗ (G5281), endurance, is putting up with things or circumstances. Both words are often found together (2Co_6:4, 2Co_6:6; 2Ti_3:10).
Makrothumía is associated with mercy (éleos [G1656]) and is used of God.