Faith – Peíthō – Yield

Faith 2As mentioned in my introduction to faith post, I was in Sunday School class a while back and had the opportunity to discuss Christian maturity with the teacher, and as you may have guessed, we wandered off into the subject of faith.

Faith

He had told me there are a number of Greek words in the New Testament that are translated “faith” in our English Bible, and I let him know I thought otherwise.

So I came home and did a quick study, using Blue Letter Bible web site.  The following table gives a summary of the New Testament Greek words used when describing our English word “faith”.

Strongs # Greek Transliterated English Equivalent
New Testament (Greek) for “faith”
G571 ἄπιστος apistos that believe not, unbelieving, faithless, unbeliever, infidel, thing incredible, which believe not
G1680 ἐλπίς elpis hope, faith
G3640 ὀλιγόπιστος oligopistos of little faith
G4102 πίστις pistis faith, assurance, believe, belief, them that believe, fidelity
G4103 πιστός pistos faithful, believe, believing, true, faithfully, believer, sure not tr
G6066 ὀλιγοπιστία oligopistia littleness of faith

faith 4I’m glad he challenged me to look it up and I think we were both sort of correct.

The root word found in each of the above greek words is pistos/pistis, and when checked in that web site I like (see above), both are derived from the Greek word “peíthō”.

Strong’s Definitions
πείθω peíthō, pi’-tho; a primary verb; to convince (by argument, true or false); by analogy, to pacify or conciliate (by other fair means); reflexively or passively, to assent (to evidence or authority), to rely (by inward certainty):—agree, assure, believe, have confidence, be (wax) conflent, make friend, obey, persuade, trust, yield.
For future posts, I would like to explore the concept of faith, and each of the terms found in the table above.  But for now, I would like to consider the root word peíthō.

Peíthō

In the Strongs Concordance definition above I have italicized a number of synonyms that are synonyms for the root word Peíthō.  
Consider the following shade of the Greek word Peíthō.
Yield
yieldThis synonym, in my thoughts, is linked to “obey”
Granted, in terms of the process of obeying, yielding will obviously be a decision made prior to the act of obedience.
And this yielding will also be dependent on having the knowledge of His will, agreeing to it (see above) and then following through with the obeying.
To “Peíthō” is to yield to the One who is the object of faith.
When I starting looking into this short study, after chatting with my brother in Sunday School, I thought I knew the direction I would go with it.  Thankfully, the Word is so full of truth gems that even a dolt like myself can fall into a deeper understanding of faith.  For this I am thankful and would happily consider your thoughts on the subject.
By the way, how is your Peíthō?
Are you agreeable to the One on the throne, believing and growing in confidence is His wisdom and abilities, obeying the known will of the Father and actively yielding?
Our next study will begin with the greek word “Apistos”  Hope to see you then!

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Faith – Peíthō – Obey

Faith 2As mentioned in my introduction to faith post, I was in Sunday School class a while back and had the opportunity to discuss Christian maturity with the teacher, and as you may have guessed, we wandered off into the subject of faith.

Faith

He had told me there are a number of Greek words in the New Testament that are translated “faith” in our English Bible, and I let him know I thought otherwise.

So I came home and did a quick study, using Blue Letter Bible web site.  The following table gives a summary of the New Testament Greek words used when describing our English word “faith”.

Strongs # Greek Transliterated English Equivalent
New Testament (Greek) for “faith”
G571 ἄπιστος apistos that believe not, unbelieving, faithless, unbeliever, infidel, thing incredible, which believe not
G1680 ἐλπίς elpis hope, faith
G3640 ὀλιγόπιστος oligopistos of little faith
G4102 πίστις pistis faith, assurance, believe, belief, them that believe, fidelity
G4103 πιστός pistos faithful, believe, believing, true, faithfully, believer, sure not tr
G6066 ὀλιγοπιστία oligopistia littleness of faith

faith 4I’m glad he challenged me to look it up and I think we were both sort of correct.

The root word found in each of the above greek words is pistos/pistis, and when checked in that web site I like (see above), both are derived from the Greek word “peíthō”.

Strong’s Definitions
πείθω peíthō, pi’-tho; a primary verb; to convince (by argument, true or false); by analogy, to pacify or conciliate (by other fair means); reflexively or passively, to assent (to evidence or authority), to rely (by inward certainty):—agree, assure, believe, have confidence, be (wax) conflent, make friend, obey, persuade, trust, yield.
For future posts, I would like to explore the concept of faith, and each of the terms found in the table above.  But for now, I would like to consider the root word peíthō.

Peíthō

In the Strongs Concordance definition above I have italicized a number of synonyms that are synonyms for the root word Peíthō.  
Consider the following shade of the Greek word Peíthō.
Obey

This has got to be the hardest synonym to discuss, given the current condition of the modern church and my own weakness and failings.

Many times in the New Testament, Jesus tells His disciples that to love Him is to obey Him. 

John 14:15

If you love me, you will keep my commandments.

John 14:23

Jesus answered him, “If anyone loves me, he will keep my word, and my Father will love him, and we will come to him and make our home with him.

Yes – but I think there is even more to it!.

John 13:35

By this all people will know that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another.”

If we obey Him, we show the world that we love Him.

And as I try to understand the gospel, it is becoming apparent to me that one who realizes I love Jesus due to my obedience to His will is the one who is typing this message.  Yes, although I am in the world, and have been told I am not part of it, I still gain (have) confidence (see above) through my active participation in the known will of God for my life.

Consider.

To “Peíthō” is to obey the One who is the object of faith.

One more post on the word Peíthō, and I will ask you to YIELD to the desire to visit.  Hope to see you then.

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Faith – Peíthō – Have Confidence

Faith 2As mentioned in my introduction to faith post, I was in Sunday School class a while back and had the opportunity to discuss Christian maturity with the teacher, and as you may have guessed, we wandered off into the subject of faith.

Faith

He had told me there are a number of Greek words in the New Testament that are translated “faith” in our English Bible, and I let him know I thought otherwise.

So I came home and did a quick study, using Blue Letter Bible web site.  The following table gives a summary of the New Testament Greek words used when describing our English word “faith”.

Strongs # Greek Transliterated English Equivalent
New Testament (Greek) for “faith”
G571 ἄπιστος apistos that believe not, unbelieving, faithless, unbeliever, infidel, thing incredible, which believe not
G1680 ἐλπίς elpis hope, faith
G3640 ὀλιγόπιστος oligopistos of little faith
G4102 πίστις pistis faith, assurance, believe, belief, them that believe, fidelity
G4103 πιστός pistos faithful, believe, believing, true, faithfully, believer, sure not tr
G6066 ὀλιγοπιστία oligopistia littleness of faith

faith 4I’m glad he challenged me to look it up and I think we were both sort of correct.

The root word found in each of the above greek words is pistos/pistis, and when checked in that web site I like (see above), both are derived from the Greek word “peíthō”.

Strong’s Definitions
πείθω peíthō, pi’-tho; a primary verb; to convince (by argument, true or false); by analogy, to pacify or conciliate (by other fair means); reflexively or passively, to assent (to evidence or authority), to rely (by inward certainty):—agree, assure, believe, have confidence, be (wax) conflent, make friend, obey, persuade, trust, yield.
For future posts, I would like to explore the concept of faith, and each of the terms found in the table above.  But for now, I would like to consider the root word peíthō.

Peíthō

In the Strongs Concordance definition above I have italicized a number of synonyms that are synonyms for the root word Peíthō.  
Consider the following shades of the Greek word Peíthō.
Have Confidence
Confidence As mentioned above, and as further clarification (I hope) of the thought above, having confidence I feel is the continually growing and deepening of the initial belief.
As I have falteringly followed the Master through this journey, I have found His trustworthiness to be beyond my original hopes.  His mercies are new everyday and I have sensed a growing confidence in the Saviors ability (not mine!) to guide and protect, to supply and correct, to help and to encourage.
To “Peíthō” is to have confidence in the One who is the object of faith.
Will you OBEY your curiosity and come visit my next post?  Hope so, since I am really enjoying this study and hope to hear from those who find value in the posts.  Thanks again!

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Faith – Peíthō – Believe

Faith 2As mentioned in my introduction to faith post, I was in Sunday School class a while back and had the opportunity to discuss Christian maturity with the teacher, and as you may have guessed, we wandered off into the subject of faith.

Faith

He had told me there are a number of Greek words in the New Testament that are translated “faith” in our English Bible, and I let him know I thought otherwise.

So I came home and did a quick study, using Blue Letter Bible web site.  The following table gives a summary of the New Testament Greek words used when describing our English word “faith”.

Strongs # Greek Transliterated English Equivalent
New Testament (Greek) for “faith”
G571 ἄπιστος apistos that believe not, unbelieving, faithless, unbeliever, infidel, thing incredible, which believe not
G1680 ἐλπίς elpis hope, faith
G3640 ὀλιγόπιστος oligopistos of little faith
G4102 πίστις pistis faith, assurance, believe, belief, them that believe, fidelity
G4103 πιστός pistos faithful, believe, believing, true, faithfully, believer, sure not tr
G6066 ὀλιγοπιστία oligopistia littleness of faith

faith 4I’m glad he challenged me to look it up and I think we were both sort of correct.

The root word found in each of the above greek words is pistos/pistis, and when checked in that web site I like (see above), both are derived from the Greek word “peíthō”.

Strong’s Definitions
πείθω peíthō, pi’-tho; a primary verb; to convince (by argument, true or false); by analogy, to pacify or conciliate (by other fair means); reflexively or passively, to assent (to evidence or authority), to rely (by inward certainty):—agree, assure, believe, have confidence, be (wax) conflent, make friend, obey, persuade, trust, yield.
For future posts, I would like to explore the concept of faith, and each of the terms found in the table above.  But for now, I would like to consider the root word peíthō.

Peíthō

In the Strongs Concordance definition above I have italicized a number of synonyms that are synonyms for the root word Peíthō.  
Consider the following shade of the Greek word Peíthō.
Believe
Believe 2
I suppose it is obvious that the root word for faith has a synonym of believe, but it may be instructive to consider that the next synonym given, is the term “Have confidence”
Difference?  I don’t know “off the top” what the difference is, but I am willing to consider a difference since both descriptive terms were supplied.  To believe, I sense is to have the mental assent of a fact, to consider a message true.
To believe is to accept an opinion, a statement, a message, a thought or a concept.  It is the seed of faith, out of which all confidence, agreement, obedience and yielding grow.  It is the germ of life out of which grows the fully mature Christian life.
To “Peíthō” is to believe the One who is the object of faith.
Come visit our next post.  I HAVE CONFIDENCE you will gain a bit more appreciation for the full meaning of Peíthō.  See you then!

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Faith – Peíthō – Agree

Faith 2As mentioned in my introduction to faith post, I was in Sunday School class a while back and had the opportunity to discuss Christian maturity with the teacher, and as you may have guessed, we wandered off into the subject of faith.

Faith

He had told me there are a number of Greek words in the New Testament that are translated “faith” in our English Bible, and I let him know I thought otherwise.

So I came home and did a quick study, using Blue Letter Bible web site.  The following table gives a summary of the New Testament Greek words used when describing our English word “faith”.

Strongs # Greek Transliterated English Equivalent
New Testament (Greek) for “faith”
G571 ἄπιστος apistos that believe not, unbelieving, faithless, unbeliever, infidel, thing incredible, which believe not
G1680 ἐλπίς elpis hope, faith
G3640 ὀλιγόπιστος oligopistos of little faith
G4102 πίστις pistis faith, assurance, believe, belief, them that believe, fidelity
G4103 πιστός pistos faithful, believe, believing, true, faithfully, believer, sure not tr
G6066 ὀλιγοπιστία oligopistia littleness of faith

faith 4I’m glad he challenged me to look it up and I think we were both sort of correct.

The root word found in each of the above greek words is pistos/pistis, and when checked in that web site I like (see above), both are derived from the Greek word “peíthō”.

Strong’s Definitions
πείθω peíthō, pi’-tho; a primary verb; to convince (by argument, true or false); by analogy, to pacify or conciliate (by other fair means); reflexively or passively, to assent (to evidence or authority), to rely (by inward certainty):—agree, assure, believe, have confidence, be (wax) conflent, make friend, obey, persuade, trust, yield.
For future posts, I would like to explore the concept of faith, and each of the terms found in the table above.  But for now, I would like to consider the root word peíthō.

Peíthō

In the Strongs Concordance definition above I have italicized a number of words that are synonyms for the root word Peíthō.  
Consider the following shade of the Greek word Peíthō.
AgreeAgree
A long time ago, when I was studying the concept of confession, I tripped over the following verse.

Act 23:8

For the Sadducees say that there is no resurrection, neither angel, nor spirit: but the Pharisees confess both.

I confess that the word “confess” is not based on the root word we are considering, but the idea of agreement is.  The Pharisees confess the resurrection, and of spirits and angels.  Did they believe in the Messiah?  That is not the point in this passage.  The point is that they had mental assent to the teaching, agreed with others, and stood firm on the truthfulness of the resurrection and of spirits.  (The point of the passage is that Paul used the Pharisee’s agreement to the resurrection in order to distract his enemies from his case – What a guy!)
It is easy to see the idea of “agree” within the root word for faith.
How can I trust or believe, obey or yield to One with whom I am not in agreement.
As Christians we seek to understand His will (albeit weakly and without full knowledge at times) and in understanding His will, have to decide to agree or disagree to it.
To “Peíthō” is to agree with the One who is the object of faith.
Will you come visit my next post? I BELIEVE you will find something of value.  Looking forward to your comments.

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Faith – Introduction

Faith 2

I was in Sunday School class early this morning and had the opportunity to discuss Christian maturity with the teacher. As we chatted, we wandered off into the subject of faith.

For the next few posts, I hope to delve a little into the concept of faith, and its real world applications for our lives.

Faith

He had told me there are a number of Greek words in the New Testament that are translated “faith” in our English Bible, and I let him know I thought otherwise.

So I came home and did a quick study, using the Blue Letter Bible web site. The following table gives a summary of the New Testament Greek words used when describing our English word “faith”.

Strongs # Greek Transliterated English Equivalent
New Testament (Greek) for “faith”
G571 ἄπιστος apistos that believe not, unbelieving, faithless, unbeliever, infidel, thing incredible, which believe not
G1680 ἐλπίς elpis hope, faith
G3640 ὀλιγόπιστος oligopistos of little faith
G4102 πίστις pistis faith, assurance, believe, belief, them that believe, fidelity
G4103 πιστός pistos faithful, believe, believing, true, faithfully, believer, sure not tr
G6066 ὀλιγοπιστία oligopistia littleness of faith

faith 4

I’m glad he challenged me to look it up and I think we were both sort of correct.

The root word found in each of the above greek words is pistos/pistis, and when checked in that web site I like (see above), both are derived from the Greek word “peíthō”.

Strong’s Definitions
πείθω peíthō, pi’-tho; a primary verb; to convince (by argument, true or false); by analogy, to pacify or conciliate (by other fair means); reflexively or passively, to assent (to evidence or authority), to rely (by inward certainty):—agree, assure, believe, have confidence, be (wax) conflent, make friend, obey, persuade, trust, yield. (Boldened words will be topics for next few blogs)
As our study progresses into each of the greek terms defined above, I would like to explore the concept of faith.
For the short term, I would like to consider the root word peíthō, as it is the most interesting of the greek words above, primarily since it has been the word I have been recently studying.
Watch for my next post – I hope you will AGREE to come visit.

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Stupid Idiots – A Response

Stupid Idiots

I went to hear a brother speak a while back that advocated that Christians should be “stupid idiots”. (His words, not mine!)

To give this brother the benefit of the doubt, and to find out what the intent of the message was, I set off on a wee bit of study into Acts 4:13, his text for the day.

After my preliminary study, I decided to contact this brother, share with him what I found in my study, discuss his message and ask for any clarification. What follows is the email I received from this brother after sending my study to him.


Carl,

Your very e-mail fully supports the whole point of the message. In fact, I shared the exact terms from your e-mail in my message. The contrast seen in this passage is between Peter and John and the learned and wise religious leaders, the very people who made the comments about them. The key was that they took note that these men had been with Jesus. We need the same today accusations from the same people who are so smart and wise (like the religious of this context) against us today. So yes, the terms are beautiful, especially as people take note that we have been with Jesus, that very necessary observation that will make religious leaders take note to label us as stupid idiots. I made it clear that spending time in the Word is what enables us to be perceived this way by the religious. So the beautiful context shows what happens to followers of Christ when they speak filled with the Holy Spirit. They will be labeled stupid idiots by the religious who don’t see miracles for what they are and haven’t spent time with Jesus. We are willing to face death rather than be “wise’ about our words before people who could kill us. I don’t think you misunderstood my message at all.

Pastor Y

_____________________________________

I appreciate this brothers efforts to clarify the issue, but in my mind, the issue is still very muddy. Should Christians seek the label of “stupid idiots”?

In summary, I think the greek words might be better understood as being untrained (unlettered), and unprofessional (a layman).

These words do not say anything directly as to the intelligence or ability of the apostles, but simply the training and associations the apostles had in relation to those judging them.

(BTW – I think it is ironic that this man is a trained professional!)

What think ye?

Should Christians seek the label of “stupid idiots”?


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Stupid Idiots – A Description

Stupid Idiots

I went to hear a brother speak a while back that advocated that Christians should be “stupid idiots”. (His words, not mine!)

To give this brother the benefit of the doubt, and to find out what the intent of the message was, I set off on a wee bit of study into Acts 4:13, his text for the day.

After my preliminary study, I decided to contact this brother, share with him what I found in my study, discuss his message and ask for any clarification. What follows is the beginning of the correspondence I had with this brother.


Act 4:13 Now when they saw the boldness of Peter and John, and perceived that they were unlearned and ignorant men, they marvelled; and they took knowledge of them, that they had been with Jesus.

A Description or a Command?

With all these technical definitions, it remains that this verse is an estimation of the apostles by the enemies of the gospel, and not an imperative for Christians to obey.

I wonder if telling the congregation to become “stupid idiots” based on Acts 4:13 was wise. In a society that is increasingly being “dumbed down”, I would hope that Christianity would argue against the trend. I surely do not advocate knowledge for the sake of knowledge, for

“knowledge puffeth up, but love edifieth”.

The critical motivating factor and fruit in a believers heart, mind and soul is love to the Master and our neighbor. But the great commandment does include our minds, and that presupposes the intake of (proper) knowledge.

As I was discussing the message with my daughter, I remembered that the apostle Paul described himself (and his entourage) as “fools for Christ” in 1 Cor 4:10. Could Paul have been describing himself from the Corinthians viewpoint (ironically), and not from a point of motivation for him (us) to look to.

I know you believe that the body of Christ is made up of all kinds of folk, some common (like myself) and some professionally trained in the “rabbinical” schools of today. He is big enough to use any person who will spend time with Him and be willing to grow in grace and the knowledge of our Lord Jesus Christ.

I do appreciate the ability to converse with you – I look forward to your reply. I am sure I have misunderstood your intent and appreciate your time in helping me understand.

Thanks for your labors

Carl

What think ye? Should Christians seek the label of “stupid idiots”?

In our next post, we will review his response.


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Stupid Idiots – Unlearned Christians

Stupid IdiotsI went to hear a brother speak a while back that advocated that Christians should be “stupid idiots”.  (His words, not mine!)

To give this brother the benefit of the doubt, and to find out what the intent of the message was, I set off on a wee bit of study into Acts 4:13, his text for the day.

After my preliminary study, I decided to contact this brother, share with him what I found in my study, discuss his message and ask for any clarification.  What follows is the beginning of the correspondence I had with this brother.


Pastor Y

If it isn’t to much, I would like to ask for some clarification. I hope I do not come off as critical or judgmental, but I am concerned about truth and aim to be gracious in my concerns (John 1:18).

During the message today, you were exhorting us to be “stupid idiots”. Surely I am misunderstanding your intent when you say that, and I think others may have also. (At least my daughter was confused.)

I took a look at the verse(s) in Acts that you were referring to and found the following (Forgive the KJV, but I have spent too much time in it to give it up!!)

Act 4:13 Now when they saw the boldness of Peter and John, and perceived that they were unlearned and ignorant men, they marvelled; and they took knowledge of them, that they had been with Jesus.

First off – unlearned (Strongs 62)

Vines states – “Unlearned (ἀγράμματοι) Or, very literally, unlettered. With special reference to Rabbinic culture, the absence of which was conspicuous in Peter’s address.”

Robertson states – “They were unlearned (agrammatoi eisin). Present indicative retained in indirect discourse. Unlettered men without technical training in the professional rabbinical schools of Hillel or Shammai. Jesus himself was so regarded (John 7:15, “not having learned letters”). ”

Clarke states – “Αγραμματοι, Persons without literature, not brought up in nor given to literary pursuits.”

ISBE states – “Unlearned un-lûr´ned: Acts 4:13 for ἀγράμματος, agrámmatos, literally “illiterate.” But nothing more than “lacking technical rabbinical instruction” seems to be meant…”

I am not sure if “stupid” and “lacking training” are synonymous. I have known many men and women, both believers and unbelievers, that are lacking in training but I would never consider stupid. (And some who have much training but….)

What think ye?

Should Christians seek the label of “stupid idiots”?


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